Real World Gardener Plant of the Week Grevillea rhyolitica

September 28th, 2014

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PLANT OF THE WEEK

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com with Karen Smith editor of Hort Journal

Grevilleas with large showy flowers are full of nectar and attract larger nectar feeding birds like lorikeets and honeyeaters and miner birds.

If you want to attract smaller birds into your garden, you’ll want grevillea flowers the size of this next plant, that cover the bush.

The smaller birds then can come into your garden without being bullied or frightened away by the larger more aggressive nectar feeders.

 

Grevillea rhyolitica is found in moist areas in forest and woodland in a the Deua National Park and surrounding areas in south-eastern New South Wales between 100 and 600 metres elevation.

No surprises then that the two cultivars are named Grevillea Deua Gold and Grevillea Deua Flame.

 

The leaves on some Grevilleas can be a bit prickly or rough to feel, but unless you’re brushing past them as you walk in the garden, it suits smaller birds as a means of shelter.

The other great thing about this Grevillea is that it might appeal to gardeners that aren’t normally attracted to Grevilleas.

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On this plant, the leaves look like a general leaf shape-light green, elliptic and on the smaller side. 

It doesn’t have serrated leaves and its flower are a bit more ornamental, so it’s a little bit different an could even be used in cottage type gardens.

Being a member of the Proteaceae family, grevilleas are phosphorous sensitive.

That means don't use chook poo, or any other manures to fertilise these plants.

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