Real World Gardener Gaura Geyser is Plant of the Week

December 14th, 2015

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 The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Gaura lindheimeri "Geyser"
Whirling Butterflies,
gaura%2Bgeyser.pngToday’s plant of the week originates from Texas and Louisiana so it’s is tolerant of drought, heat and humidity.
As summer gets going and the temperature climbs, you’re garden may take a bit of a beating.

In comes the butterfly plant that adds a tough of lightness to your garden border; a bit like gypsophila used to do, but we don’t grow that so much nowadays.

Listen to the podcast to find out about them.

Talking with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

PLAY: Gaura Geyser_9th December 2015

 Gaura Geyser is a tough little plant the can be pruned almost to the ground to give more flowering during the summer months.

'Geyser Pink' is an upright, bushy, freely-branching perennial with tall, slender stems bearing narrow, lance-shaped, mid-green leaves and wand-like panicles of pink flowers from early summer into autumn.

gaura%2Bgeyser%2Bpruned.JPG
Gaura Geyser pink

Gaura Geyser is a dense but compact plant that  flowers until the first frost.

Strong branching supports large, long-lasting deep pink blooms.

Exceptional in containers and as a cut flower.

Gaura Geyser like all Gauras. tolerates drought, heat and humidity.

 

The name Gaura means Superb, but now that botanists have changed the name to Oenothera or pronounced OWEN-O-THERA, putting it in the same family as evening primrose.
Where does Oenothera come from?
It’s not really certain but perhaps from the Greek words onos theras, meaning "donkey catcher", or oinos theras, meaning "wine seeker".
But also the Latin oenothera means "a plant whose juices may cause sleep" and there’s no record of this plant causing that.
I have heard it called wand flower and butterfly bush because the petals are held on long stalks above the clump of leaves; and it certainly makes a stunning edging plant

If you have any questions about growing Gaura Geyser, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

 

 

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