Real World Gardener Aphids part2 in Plant Doctor

March 13th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website

www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

with Steve Falcioni, GM of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Probably one of the first pests that you’ll learn to identify is aphids.



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aphids come in yellow, green, black and brown



Just by looking at how many there are, you’ll be left in no doubt that aphids are pests and not beneficial or good bugs.

In the warmer months they seem to get around in their hundreds and at this time of year, the good bugs will need a helping hand.

But not with something that will harm them.

 Surprisingly, aphids can travel in on the wind.

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Just in case you weren’t sure what an aphid looks like, Aphids are small, soft-bodied insects with long slender mouthparts that they use to pierce stems, leaves, and other softer plant parts to suck out fluids.

They have soft pear-shaped bodies with long legs and antennae and may be green, yellow, brown, red, or black depending on the species and the plants they feed on.

 

A few types of aphids have a waxy or woolly appearance because of a waxy white or grey secretion over their body surface.

Did you know that almost every plant has one or more types of aphid that occasionally feed on it?

 



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lacewing larvae



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ladybird larvae



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spend a bit of time getting to know the good bugs in your garden. Turn over leaves to check for ladybird and lacewing larvae.

Seems like Neem oil and botanical oils are the safest bet to use in your garden because it does the least harm to beneficial insects.

If you have any questions about aphids or a photo of a sick plant that you want diagnosed, send it in to  2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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