Real World Gardener Plants for Shade Under Trees in Design Elements

June 11th, 2021

SHADY GARDENS PART 2

What to plant under the shade of trees.

Shade trees are great, but what can you plant under them that can cope with the root competition and low levels of sunlight throughout the year.

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You want something attractive of course and not just a bare area.
In one of my shady spots 

 
I've attached a birds nest fern (pictured) to the trunk of a silk oak (Grevillea robusta).

 
In the same space are many cliveas, which is a bit of  a standout with evergreen foliage and available in more colours than just bright orange, pastel colours such as creams, yellows and white.
 
Neomarica gracilis or walking iris, are another perfect suggestion.
 
Shade in gardens that is provided by trees has a much bigger cooling effect that say shade soils or umbrellas.
Other suggestions this time  for cool climate gardens are Huechera species.  

This shady garden series is not so much what makes the best shade trees, but what can grow in various types of shade, whether it’s a shady side passage, a shady balcony, or just a shady part of the garden.

 
Let’s find out more ? I'm talking with Steve McGrane, agriculturalist and horticulturist.

Real World Gardener Shady Gardens part 1 in Design Elements

June 11th, 2021

DESIGN ELEMENTS

SHADY GARDENS PART 1

This shady garden series is not so much what makes the best shade trees, but what can grow in various types of shade, whether it’s a shady side passage, a shady balcony, or just a shady part of the garden.
Do you have some shade in your garden?
Perhaps it’s a really shady garden because of neighbouring trees or buildings, or perhaps your own trees have grown quite big and created a lot of shade.

Over the next four weeks, Steve and I will be discussing what plants do best in a variety of shady gardens, but today, why is shade in a garden so important?

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Shady gardens will provide refuge from the heat in summer. Your garden may be basking in full winter sun right now, but in summer, you and some of your plants will want more shade for cooling.

The leaves take advantage of even the slightest of breezes providing some air movement.
Shade in gardens that is provided by trees has a much bigger cooling effect that say shade sails or umbrellas.
On a hot day, the shade under a mature tree can be up to 10 degrees cooler than the actual temperature but the trick is to find what grows under those shade trees. 
Alternatively, you may be able to lift the canopy so that more light reaches the lower levels or the understorey.

Let’s find out more? I'm talking with Steve McGrane, agriculturalist and horticulturist.

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