Real World Gardener Indoor Plant Pests in Design Elements

September 26th, 2019

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Indoor Plant Pests Under Control

Over the past few weeks, we’ve talked about what plants you can grow indoors wherever you live in Australia.

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Quite a few in fact can cope with all weather conditions for the far north of Australia to Tasmania.

Despite all your loving attention though, some plants can be susceptible to pest attack, or just like plain unhealthy, making you think you did something wrong.

Not necessarily true, so let’s find out about looking after indoor plants

That was Julia Levitt Director of www.sticksandstonesld.com.au

PLAY: Indoor plants-pests_2nd August 2017

Even the best plant owner will come across pests.

The trick is to keep an eye on your plants and act quickly as soon as you see something wrong with your indoor plant.

Why are we having plants indoors again?

Apart from plants reducing carbon dioxide levels in your home, did you know that people with plants in their homes have less stress, and plants have been known to contribute to lower blood pressure?

If you have any questions about indoor plant pests why not email us realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

Real World Gardener Water Gum in Plant of the Week

September 26th, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Tristaniopsis laurina: Water Gum

 

This week we have a native plant that has Tristaniopsis laurina or Water gum is like the native version of Crepe myrtles, with interesting bark, leaves and flowers.

It’s in the Myrtaceae family but it’s not a gum tree.

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Water gum in flower: I'ts not a gum tree.

Let’s find out what’s good about this one.

I'm speaking with Adrian O’Malley, horticulturist and native plant expert.

But are the flowers perfumed? Adrian thought not but apparently they do have a perfume.

There’s an updated version called Tristaniopsis laurina ‘Luscious.”that grows up to 8m in height.

Leaves are dark green, shiny and large with a dense canopy.

New growth starts out a distinctive copper colour and further interest appears over time with the branches developing deep purple coloured bark which peels back to reveal a smooth, cream trunk.

Flowers are yellow and sweetly perfumed, appearing in clusters through summer.

 

If you have any questions for me or for Adrian or would like some seeds of this tree, please write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener Rufous Bristlebird on Wildlife in Focus

September 26th, 2019

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Rufous BristleBird

Did you know that Australia has ground dwelling birds other than emus, brush turkeys, and Cassowary?

Out of all those birds I just mentioned, gardeners might prefer the Rufous Bristlebird digging around in their garden. 

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Rufous Birstlebird

Do you know why it's called a bristlebird?

Let’s find out.

 

The Rufous Bristlebird (Dasyorni Broadbenti) is only found in Australia and mainly along coastal areas in south-western Victoria.

Bristlebirds are generally shy birds that skulk in dense vegetation during the day. They prefer to run away to avoid danger, but are capable of flying short distances. Bit like the brush turkey.

Usually they hang around in pairs 

The common name of the family is derived from the presence of prominent rictal bristles - three stiff, hair-like feathers curving downwards on either side of the gape.

As with fantails and flycatchers, their bristles assist in catching insects.

Bristlebirds have previously been seen in south-western Western Australia and south-eastern South Australia, but unfortunately frequent burning has led to their extinction in W.A.

Have you seen a Rufous Bristlebird?

If you have any questions for me or for Holly, why not write in to Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Real World Gardener Henley Green Community Garden Update

September 22nd, 2019

Henley  Green Community Garden Update

There are many reasons to join a community garden: learn a new skill, teach your kids where food comes from, save money, help the environment, have a reason to get outside regularly and share with others.

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Chickens at Henley Green Community garden

These reasons — and many more keep the people who grow food at a community garden.

Let’s catch up with what’s happening in the local community garden at Henley.

I'm speaking with Nicole Miranda from the Happy Hens Community garden in Henley.

If you are interested in joining the community garden at Henley you need to first register your interest by filling in a form from their website www.happyhens.org.au

If you have any questions for me or for Nicole, please write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener Silver Shield in Plant of The Week

September 22nd, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Plectranthus argentatus: Silver Shield

This week we have a native plant that has velvety leaves, sage green foliage and blue flowers.

It’s in the mint family, so it’s got square stems.

I’m not sure why some people think that only exotics come from the mint family.

Australia has quite a few members that fit into this category.

Let’s find out what’s good about this one.I'm speaking with new contributor, Adrian O’Malley, horticulturist and native plant expert.

  • “Plectranthus” is a combination of 2 Greek words that mean “spur” (plectron) and “flower” (anthos).
  • Argentatus is Latin for silver.

Plectranthus argentatus or Silver Shield prefers partial shade but will grow in full sun as long as the soil’s not too poor.

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Can also grow in full shade and tolerate light frosts, that’s down to -2 C.

Excellent in dry shade.

The best spot for it though is in well drained soil near trees, also a great plant for containers.

If you have any questions for me or for Adrian or would like some seeds of the Snow Wood tree, please write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener Salt in Spice it Up

September 22nd, 2019

SPICE IT UP

Sea%2Bsalt.jpgSalt

Is salt a spice a seasoning or something else?

Is there more than one type of salt?

Why should we use it rather than leave it out?

Did you know that culinary salts come in two basic categories - sea salt and mined salt?

All this and more about salt. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

Let’s find out

Salt is actually a mineral, not a spice which means it doesn’t lose its flavour over time like spices and herbs do.

Salt is used as a seasoning, and is just NaCl or sodium chloride.

Most dishes that would be spiced will contain salt.

There are many types of salts on the market but they fall into two categories.

1) salts with impurities, that give a different flavour.

2) salts with different textures.

An example the first is Murray River pink salt. The colour is pink because of the minerals that the aquifer has flown through.

Rock salt is mined salt.

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Murray River Pink Salt

  • Indian Black salt is also mined salt. Initially  the big chunks that are mined are deep purple to almost black in colour. However, when it is crushed, it becomes a pale pink in colour. Exudes a pungent odour.
  • this salt is a key ingredient in  'chat masala' which also contains cumin, coriander seed and asefetida. 
  • if requestingd the salted version of the drink lassi , it will contain chat masala.

All salt originates in sea water, but sea salt is evaporated from liquid ocean water, while mined salt is taken from ancient deposits left by long-dry seas.

Ian's Secret Tip: salt is cheap and heavy and added to some spice blends to make them cheaper so watch out and just buy the best.

If you have any questions either for me or for Ian, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Real World Gardener Snow Wood in Plant of the Week

September 13th, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Parachidendron pruinosum: Snow Wood Tree.

There are some plants, be it trees, shrubs, perennials or annuals, which don’t make it into the mainstream of plant shops, not even online.

Whether it’s because people aren’t aware of its existence or because it’s hard to propagate in large number, the fact remains, it’s just not out there.

But there are plenty of good reasons why you should grow a Snow Wood.

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Snow Wood fruits after opening.

Let’s find out I'm talking with new contributor, to "plant of the week" segment,  Adrian O’Malley, horticulturist and native plant expert.

The fragrant flowers are pom-pom like heads, greenish-white or golden yellow and darkening with age.

Flowering time is October to January. The fruit pod matures from February to June .

Fruit pods are very attractive, twisting when they split open to reveal black shiny large seeds and look a bit like acacia fruit pods. 

Seeds are black, shiny and mostly flat, oval in shape. 

Germination tip:Scarification of the seeds helps germination, which is slow but fairly reliable.

Seen in RBG Sydney near the Moor building. Pararchidendron pruinosum is an Australian rainforest tree naturally occuring from the Shoalhaven River in New South Wales to Herberton in north Queensland. 

Also found in New Guinea and Indonesia.

If you have any questions for me or for Adrian or would like some seeds of this tree, please write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener What Mulch is That in Plant Doctor

September 13th, 2019

PLANT DOCTOR

Mulches,Mulches, Mulches

Here we are again, talking about mulches when you probably want to hear about something more interesting right? There’s a reason why gardeners keep talking about mulches, and that is, it’s an important part of gardening whether we like it r not.

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And, there’s a right way and a wrong way to spread the mulch.

I'm talking with Steve Falcioni from www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au.

 

Mulches are important, especially in areas that are drought affected or are experiencing water restrictions.

The mulch locks in soil moisture and keeps soil cool in warm weather.

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Applying mulch can be a bit of a chore, but it's worth it in the long run.

The reverse is true in cold weather, where the mulch acts a sort of blanket and helps retain heat in the soil layer.

Mulch also acts as a barrier to weed seeds and helps with wind erosion.

Over the years the advice as to how much mulch to apply has changed.

Fine mulch shouldn’t be more than 1cm thick, but chunky mulches, can be around 5cm thick.

Remember of course, that organic mulches bring microbial life to your soil, whereas the inorganic, mostly chunky mulches are just a layer of protection.

TIP: Leave some space around the trunk of trees, as it may encourage fungal growth or collar rot if right up against the main trunk.

If you have any questions either for me or for Steve, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Real World Gardener Wattles or Acacia in Talking Flowers

September 6th, 2019

TALKING FLOWERS

Wattles:Acacia species.

Family: Mimosaceae, 1, 000 species out of 1350 worldwide originate originate in Australia.

Australia's Acacias have a huge range of flower and leaf shape. Some have fern like foliage, others have leaves like they should belong on a gum tree. 

Flower colour is mainly yellow, followed by cream, but one outstanding cultivar has red flowers.

Acacia leprosa "Scarlet Blaze." Acacia_leprosa_%2527Scarlet_Blaze%2527_f

Most of the species flower during the end of winter or the beginning of spring. The most common Acacia, the Golden Wattle (Arcacias pycnantha) is found in the South Eastern parts of Australia, and the hotter and drier climates.

Acacia pycnantha or Golden Wattle tree, is a shrub of about 4-8 metres. 

Vase life:4-6 days.

I'm talking with Floral therapist Mercedes Sarmini of www.floralgossip.com.au

Real World Gardener Community Garden in Henley pt 1

September 6th, 2019

COMMUNITY GARDEN IN HENLEY

When a community garden sets up in your district are you excited or non-plussed?

What things do they get up to anyway? Henley%2BGreen%2BCommunity%2BGarden%2B5.

I'm talking with Nicole Miranda from the Happy Hens Community garden in Henley.

If you are interested in joining the community garden at Henley you need to first register your interest by filling in a form from their website www.happyhens.org.au

 Feel free to tend to the Henley Green Community Garden at any time.

We meet every Friday from 10am - 12 noon Monday from 9 - 11am and Sunday 3 to 5pm

at Henley Green Community Garden

If you have any questions for me or for Nicole, please write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

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