Real World Gardener Grow Your Plants part 2 in Design Elements

August 8th, 2019

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Grow Your Plants part 2: series final

Last week it was when and how much to water your plants to keep them alive, and today it’s about plant health problems.

We start off with finding out why the plant isn’t thriving and in fact is dropping leaves.

Sound familiar?

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Gardens like this one need care and maintenance.

Let’s find out what needs doing.

I'm talking with Glenice Buck of Glenice Buck Designs. www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

Not so much digging now, other than weeding but looking after your plant because, after all, it’s not plastic.

So why are the leaves dropping off?

Causes: 

  • Check your watering. You might think the water is getting through to the roots but is it really? Add wetting agent if you find the the soil is not being wetted sufficiently.
  • Nutrient deficiency-are the yellow leaves the new growth or the old growth?
    • new leaves yellowing signals possible iron deficiency. Correct with chelated iron.
    • Old leaves yellowing signals possible nitrogen deficiency. Correct with an all purpose liquid or soluble fertiliser.
    • Calcium deficiency results in distorted or irregularly shaped new leaves (top of plant). The leaf margins and tips become necrotic. Correct with an application of Dolomite.
  • Wind can cause physical damage, with leaves have brown/grey tips.

    1-Leaf%2BScorch3.JPG

    Wind and sun scorch have similar symptoms.

Watering, fertilising and looking out for pest and disease issues are all part of gardening.

For all the latest news - Follow Glenice on Facebook or Instagram

Facebook : www.facebook/glenicebuckdesigns

Instagram: Glenice_Buck_Designs

Or check out my website: www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

Or Subscribe to my monthly Garden Greetings Newsletter: www.tinyletter.com/glenicebuckdesigns

Real World Gardener Join A Garden Club

August 8th, 2019

TOOL TIME

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Plant Cuttings

Why Join A Garden Club?

Joining a garden club may sound a bit off topic for the tool time segment.

However, General Manager of cut above tools, Tony Mattson has given his fair share of gardening talks and has some insights to share about what the benefits are of joining.

Let’s find out. I'm talking with Tony Mattson, general manager of www.cutabovetools.com.au

 

Great reasons to join a garden club include

  • Share your gardening knowledge or gain knowledge from plant experts that may be in the club.
  • Pruning tips for your area.
  • Swap seedlings
  • Cutting table and plants for sale, usually for a few dollars each.
  • Homemade refreshments at the end of the night.
  • Excursions to gardens or gardening events such as Floriade or MIFGS (Melbourne Internation Flower Show.)

    Sei%2BSei%2BTei%2BShow%2BGarden%2BMIFGS.

    Sei-Sei Tei Show Garden MIFGS

If you look up garden clubs of Australia website, https://gardenclubs.org.au/

you will find your nearest garden club.

For example I looked up what garden club was near TANK fm in Kempsey. Turns out there’s a garden club very close, South West Rocks and District Garden Club Inc, that meets every 2nd Monday 10am.

Very few of the garden clubs have a website but there’s always a phone number, so go on, give it a go. You’ve got nothing to lose and plenty to gain.

If you have any questions for me or for Tony, email us at rea.worldgardener@gmail.com.

Or you can write in to 2RRR PO Box 644, Gladesville NSW

Real World Gardener Albany Woolly Bush In Plant of the Week

August 1st, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Albany Woolly Bush : Adenanthos sericeus

Are you a fan of Western Australian plants?

They grow so many wildflowers, banksias, and Eucalypts with huge inflorescences or inflo’s as those in the now like to call them.

But how do they do in other parts of Australia, particularly if they’re grey and fluffy and have been used mostly as a Christmas tree? 

Red-capped_Parrot_-_Jalbany%2Bwoolly%2Bb

I'm talking with Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Let’s find out …

 

The greyness and upright growth of the Albany woolly bush makes it look sort of snow covered making it the perfect choice if you want a real Australian Christmas tree.

  • If you want to grow this well, choose a rocky sandy spot in your garden because that’s the kind of environment it comes from.
  • Otherwise grow it in a pot 

Real World Gardener Grow It Part 1 in Design Elements

August 1st, 2019

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Grow It part 1

A new series called ‘dig, plant, grow’ & today and it’s all about grow it pt. 1.

The biggest issue for new gardeners, is “how much, and how often do I water?”

Almost like asking how long is a piece of string?

This and other vexing questions are answered.

Let’s find out what needs doing. 

I'm talking with Glenice Buck of Glenice Buck Designs.

www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

Not so much digging now, other than weeding but looking after your plant because, after all, it’s not plastic.

1-1-AFTER%2B4.jpg

photo Glenice Buck

Watering, fertilising and looking out for pest and disease issues are all part of gardening.

For all the latest news - Follow Glenice on Facebook or Instagram

Facebook : www.facebook/glenicebuckdesigns

Instagram: Glenice_Buck_Designs

Or Subscribe to my monthly Garden Greetings Newsletter: www.tinyletter.com/glenicebuckdesigns

Real World Gardener Woodash for the Garden in The Good Earth

August 1st, 2019

THE GOOD EARTH

Woodash and Charcoal for the garden

Winter time is when woodfires are burning in homes for warmth in all but tropical areas around the country.

Or perhaps you’ve been barbecuing or smoking some produce for the dinner table, and have some woodash?

wood%2Bfire.jpg

So what do you do with the leftover woodash and bits of charcoal?

Would you be thinking that the woodash and charcoal from the fire can or cannot be used in the garden? 

Let’s find out .

I'm talking with Margaret Mossakowska of www.mosshouse.com.au 

wood-ash.jpg

It turns out the woodash and charcoal are great amendments for your soil in the garden.

Charcoal are the black bits left over when the fire has died down. Essentially, it's the wood that hasn't been fully combusted.

Woodash is alkaline, so it’s great for those plants, such as from the onion family but not for Azaleas, Camellias, Rhododendrons and other acid loving plants.

Charcoal, on the other hand, is great for increasing the water holding capacity of your soil, and potting mix, plus it’s a home for microbes and fungi.

  • You can put your crushed charcoal in the worm farm, but not too much, otherwise the worms will be dessicated. 

Margaret suggests making a liquid slurry of the woodash before adding only a small amount.

If you have any questions for me or for Margaret, email us at rea.worldgardener@gmail.com.

Or you can write in to 2RRR PO Box 644, Gladesville NSW

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