Real World Gardener Sweet Violets in Talking Flowers

July 25th, 2019

TALKING FLOWERS

Sweet Violet: Viola odorata and Viola banksia (syn Viola hederacea)

Family: Violaceae

Also known as wood violet sweet violet, English violet, common violet, florist's violet, or garden violet.

Leaves are edible, good for salads.viola%2Bodorata.jpg

  • ·         In temperate climates, sweet violets (Viola odorata, ht 8cm) begin flowering in winter and continue into early spring.
  • ·         They are rhizomatous perennials which originated in Western and Southern Europe. 

They spread  via seed and runners to form a green groundcover of heart-shaped leaves, often coming up in unexpected places in the garden. 

Violets flower best in part-sun, but will grow in full sun or full shade and prefer moist soil.

Bunches of violets great winter posies.

Cut them in the morning or evening; dipping the bunch of flowers head down into a large bowl of water to soak for a while will extend their vase life, as will spraying a fine mist of water over the flowers when they are in their vase.

  • Sugared Violets
  • The flowers can also be turned into sugared violets for cake decorations, by painting the petals with egg white and dipping them into caster sugar!

Native violets, Viola banksia, have no scent, but flower in a similar fashion.

Flowers are edible.

Grows and spreads by rhizomes. Full sun or part shade.

I'm talking with Mercedes Sarmini, floral therapist www.floralgossip.com.au

Real World Gardener Choosing The Right Plants in Design Elements

July 25th, 2019

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Plant It

The series called ‘dig, plant, grow’ continues and it’s all about what you need to do to the soil before planting anything.

Of course you assessed the soil you have in the garden after listening to last week’s segment didn’t you?

So what next, are you happy to choose just plants that you love or do you need to be a bit more discerning?

Let’s find out ? I'm talking with Glenice Buck of Glenice Buck Designs.

www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

Digging some more in the garden is also involved when it comes to planting, but don’t just plonk the plant into a hole you’ve dug, fill it, and water in, then hope for the best.

Preparation is the key to success.

Planting%2Bpepper.jpg

Preparation before planting

It may take a bit longer but you’ll have years of rewarded effort you did on the day.

For all the latest news - Follow Glenice on Facebook or Instagram

Facebook : www.facebook/glenicebuckdesigns

Instagram: Glenice_Buck_Designs

Or check out my website: www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

Or Subscribe to my monthly Garden Greetings Newsletter: www.tinyletter.com/glenicebuckdesigns

 

TALKING FLOWERS

Real World Gardener Herbal Thyme in Plant of the Week

July 25th, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Thyme: Thymus vulgaris

Thyme is a herb with a multitude of uses and not just for cooking.

Thyme uses are also as an anti-microbial and is good in a tea for sore throats, and sore stomach problems.

Thymus_vulgaris_4zz.jpg

Thymus vulgaris

 

Thyme is a part of bouquet garni, but you can use thyme on its own in cooking. Thyme is surprisingly, it’s good with chocolate, and try cinnamon and thyme is part of crumb on chicken!

Let’s find out how more.

I'm talking with Simone Jeffries, naturopath and herbalist. www.simonejeffriesnaturopath.com.au

The first thing to consider when growing thyme is that it's a mediterranean herb, so likes the same conditions here. Dry, hot summers and cool winters.

If you don't have a similar growing environment you can of course, grow it in a pot.

To get the most out of your thyme plant, give it a good haircut in autumn.

Lift and divide the plant so that you'll always have plenty of thyme in the garden.

The best culinary thyme is common thyme (Thymus vulgaris).

Creeping thyme or woolly thyme is not recommened other than as a rockery plant, lawn edges or lawn alternatives.

If you have any questions either for me or for Simone, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

Real World Gardener Lovely Banksia in Plant of the Week

July 18th, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Banksia spinulosa

This next plant is a native but is often overlooked because people go for the more colourful and show Grevilleas.

They may come in limited colourways, but their flowers are much more substantial and spectacular, particular if you have several cultivars planted or grouped together.

Plus they provide nectar for wildlife during the colder months of the year.

Let’s find out about them

I'm talking with Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

Banksia spinulosa isn’t slow growing at all and within a couple of years, if grown from seed, will have reached over one metre tall and wide, plus provide a least 8 flower spikes.

These flower spikes you can either cut for the vase, or just leave on the bush for the native wildlife to enjoy.

banksia%2Bspinulosa.jpg

Banksia spinulosa

As cut flowers, Banksias can last for months.

 

Real World Gardener Visit New Zealand in Garden History

July 18th, 2019

GARDEN HISTORY

National Conference

If you’ve never been to NZ, then perhaps you could tag along to the Australia Garden History Society’s 40th National Conference which is being held in Wellington.

But what happens at a National Conference and why should you go?

I'm talking with Stuart Read, committee member of the Australian Garden History Society.

Let’s find out..

 

Greenahugh%2BGarden%2BNZ.jpg

Greenhaugh Garden New Zealand

 

Going to the conference?

Register at www.gardenhistorysociety.org.au to book for the conference.

There’s also a post conference tour alternative of the South Island.

The tour begins in Christchurch and ends in Queenstown.

If you have any questions for me or for Stuart write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener Dig, Plant, Grow, Part 1 in Design Elements

July 18th, 2019

Dig, Plant, Grow
A lot of people from all ages, would like to start gardening but don't know where to begin

This new series called ‘dig, plant, grow’ is all about starting a garden either from scratch or perhaps you’ve inherited a garden and want to know what to do. 

In either case you’ll be doing some digging.

Home%2Bgarden%2Bin%2Brain.jpg
My own garden in the rain: photo M Cannon

Let’s find out how to start. 
I'm talking with Glenice Buck of Glenice Buck Designs
www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au 

  • Glenice suggests digging a BIG hole!
  • Yep, 50cm deep if you can go that far without hitting bedrock. Not  for the faint hearted. 
    • this gives you an idea of what soil layers and textures you have.

      gardening-digging%2Ba%2Bhole.jpg

  • Add a bucket of water to the hole to see how fast it drains away. This is testing the drainage of your soil.
  • You can't change climate, aspect, soil texture and drainage of your soil, but it pays to know what you're dealing with.
Glenice runs her workshops in Young, however there are similar workshops in all capitals and regional centres. Check out your local newspaper for more information. 
For example, Sydney Community College runs a workshop which covers those topics called Small Space Gardening, which I run. It’s on a Monday evening. 
For all the latest news - Follow Glenice on Facebook or Instagram 
Facebook : www.facebook/glenicebuckdesigns 
Instagram: Glenice_Buck_Designs 
Or check out the website: www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au 
Or Subscribe to the monthly Garden Greetings Newsletter: www.tinyletter.com/glenicebuckdesigns

 

Real World Gardener Camellia Faves in Plant of the Week

July 9th, 2019

PLANT OF THE WEEK:

Choosing Camellias

Are you a fan of camellias?

Perhaps you’ve never thought of growing them?

You may be surprised to learn that they are a plant that can put up with a lot of neglect and still manage to flower magnificently during winter.

Let’s find out what are some favourites.

I'm talking with Jeremy Critchley of www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

 

Camellias mentioned:

1-1-1-camellia%2Blovelight.JPG

Camellia 'Lovelight'

Camellia japonica Lovelight: pure white with boss of yellow stamens.

Camellia japonica WH Davies Descanso: pale pink, anemonoflora type

Camellia Betty Cuthbert: Pink double

Camellia japonica Dona de Freitas de Magales-pale purple

 If you’re wanting to add to camellias in your garden, now’s the time to look around for ones you really like.

Don’t just settle for what’s in one nursery. Go online to see what else can be gotten for that extra special camellia.

 

Real World Gardener Creating Garden Edges in Design Elements

July 9th, 2019

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Create a Garden Edge:

How do you create a garden edge for your lovely path that you created to keep those plants from growing into it?

There’s a few different ways it seems and some more labour intensive than others.

Let’s find out..

I'm talking with Landscape Designer, and, Director of Urban Meadows Jason Cornish.

brick%2Bedging.jpg

Brick edging can look amateur if not done correctly.

Steel edges look great and are relatively easy to install. Some even interlock and have spikes that anchor them into the ground.

The cheap way is to use those second hand bricks left and dig a trench and put them straight in.

  • Of course there’s always a better way of doing that same job and that’s to lay down sand and mortar so that the bricks won’t move if your lawnmower knocks them.

If you have any questions for me or for Jason, write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener Creating Garden Edges in Design Elements

July 9th, 2019

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Create a Garden Edge:

How do you create a garden edge for your lovely path that you created to keep those plants from growing into it?

There’s a few different ways it seems and some more labour intensive than others.

Let’s find out..

I'm talking with Landscape Designer, and, Director of Urban Meadows Jason Cornish.

brick%2Bedging.jpg

Brick edging can look amateur if not done correctly.

Steel edges look great and are relatively easy to install. Some even interlock and have spikes that anchor them into the ground.

The cheap way is to use those second hand bricks left and dig a trench and put them straight in.

  • Of course there’s always a better way of doing that same job and that’s to lay down sand and mortar so that the bricks won’t move if your lawnmower knocks them.

If you have any questions for me or for Jason, write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

Real World Gardener NEW Allspice in Spice it Up

July 9th, 2019

Allspice: Pimento doica

Have you ever put the wrong ingredient into something you’ve cooked? 
Perhaps it was just the wrong spice and the flavour wasn’t so good which left you wondering “what went wrong?”

AllspiceSeeds.jpg

Allspice can cause confusion, so let’s clear it up now. 
I'm talking with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au 

Now you know not to mix up Allspice with Mixed Spice or even pimento. 

Allspice is an individual spice whereas mixed spice is a combination of spices mainly for sweet dishes.

Pimento%2Bdoica_Allspice.jpg
Pimento doica
  • The actual spice is a berry from the allspice tree.
  • Ian tried to grow it on the north coast of NSW but was unsuccessful. Winters were too cold.
  • You can try to grow it but I would recommend erecting a 3-sided shelter out of heavy-duty shade cloth, to surround the young tree.
Allspice has a fruity background note, but it has an aroma that is similar to Basil because both have the volatile oil eugenol present in them.

  • Basil is the tomato herb, and allspice is the tomato spice.

The leaf has an extract taken from it and used in an astringent called 'bay rum." It has nothing to do with the drink called rum, but is used after shaving in a barber shop.

If you have any questions either for me or for Ian, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

- Older Posts »

Play this podcast on Podbean App