Real World Gardener Climbing Plants ? Climbing Plants for a Tropical Garden in Design Elementsn Design Elements

July 8th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Climbers for a Tropical Zone

In a Tropical Zone there are many climbers that will grow well in the warmer climates.  One thing I did notice when I was thinking about the plants suitable for warmer climates is that the climbers suitable for this area do have brightly coloured flowers.

There’s so much to be said about climbing plants, even if you have a small garden, climbers can be used to hide walls, or fence off boundaries, without spreading into the limited space of the garden.

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Mandevilla sanderi

They are also a cheap and easy way to cover up something unsightly, such as a shed or water tank, or to soften a harsh wall, fence or tree trunk.This segment is all about tropical climbers which by the way don’t always have to grow in tropical climates because you know, gardeners want to test the boundaries.Let’s find out. I'm talking with Glenice Buck, Consulting Arborist and Landscape Designer.

bauhinia-corymbosa.jpgThe Pandorea species are exceptional because they can tolerate quite a range of conditions and temperatures even though they’re from tropical zones.
On the other hand, Mandevillas not so much, but then again, indoor is not a bad idea for these if you like them. 

Glenice's top 5 tropical climbers are

  • Pyrostegia venusta
  • Beaumontia grandiflora

    Bougainvillea

  • Climbing Frangipani (Chonemorpha fragrans)

  • Yellow Allamanda or Golden Trumpet Vine

How about "Bauhinia Corymbosa" Or Butterfly Vine
Butterfly vine is an evergreen vine in sub-tropical conditions that can be semi-deciduous in cooler climates with older leaves dropping in cold winters, a beautiful vine with attractive and unusual foliage and small orchid-like flowers with unique 2 lobed leaves hints at its placement in the pea family. All through the warmer months there are plenty of pale pink flowers with dark veining and ideal for covering a pergola, fence or over a tree and is spectacular as a groundcover especially when in flower

Real World Gardener Fixing Camellia Disease Problems in Plant Doctor

July 8th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT DOCTOR

If you’ve ever been travelling through Europe, or even England, Camellias aren’t one of those plants that you’re likely to come across all that much.

According the English Broadcaster and gardener Monty Don, over there, the main problem with the Camellia japonica and Camellia reticulata varieties is that, when their flowers start to fade, they cling to the shrub, looking for weeks like used tissue. The only way to deal with this is to dead-head each bloom by hand – otherwise it is like having a wonderful party then failing to tidy up afterwards.

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Add caption

The combination of this extra work and the belief that most camellias were tender and therefore needed special protection meant that interest in camellias went into decline at the beginning of the 20th century.

But for us here in Australia, Camellias are one of the most popular winter- and spring-flowering shrubs, providing a vivid splash of colour when little else is in bloom.

So today we’re talking how to look after them when disease strikes these wonderful shrubs.

So let’s find out how to fix this.I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, General Manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

In this country the greatest problems are from wet winters and spring frosts, so to get away from this you need to add grit and compost to the planting hole so that the roots do not sit in wet soil.

Freezing conditions dehydrate the leaves, which lose more water as they thaw, especially if exposed to wind.

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Camellia japonica Lovelight

The frozen roots mean that no water is taken up to replace this, and the result is often that the top or exposed part of the shrub dies back.

The extent of the damage will not become fully apparent until spring, when new growth appears and, if the roots are damaged, will drop and die back.

Draping fleece over the plant is a short-term remedy, but the most importantfactor is to provide permanent shelter from the wind.

If you have a camellia in a pot, wrap the pot in bubble wrap or bring it indoors in cold weather.

If you have any questions about problems with your Camellias or any other shrub, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

Real World Gardener NEW Coleus are Plant of the Week

July 3rd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Coleus species: Solenostemon scutellarioides

These plants (Coleus species) have a huge variation in the leaf patterns that you can buy.



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Solonostemon scutellariodes: Coleus plants photo M Cannon



 

Once thought of as old fashioned plants along with the Aspidistra and your grandmother’s doillies, they seem to be coming back into vogue with newer colour variations that range from lime green to bright red.

What could this plant be? Let’s find out. I'm talking with the plant panel : Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Coleus have square stems with saw-toothed, scalloped or ruffled leaf edges.

Coleus species are frost tender and need winter protection outside the subtropics.

In cool temperate climates grow these plants in the conservatory, as house plants, or outdoors as annual bedding plants.



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Solonostemon scutellariodes: Coleus plants photo M Cannon



Easily grown from cuttings, which can be taken at any time of the year, but best in late summer for winter indoor growth, and late winter/early spring from indoor plants for outdoor summer growth. Use young, non-woody stem cuttings, which can be rooted either in potting mix or in water.

Leaf patterns are so bizarre they may have inspired Paisley prints on fabrics.

But you may just want to brighten that dull corner of your garden and this is the plant to do it with.

Real World Gardener Climbing Plants Deciduous or Evergreen? in Design Elements

July 3rd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community RadioNetwork. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOKThe complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Evergreen or Deciduous Climbers?

Last week it was all about how plants climb, whether it’s from grasping a support with thin shoots that curl around like in Passionfruit plants, or with hooks as in Bouganvilleas and roses.



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Wisteria is a deciduous climber

But now you need to decide if you want a deciduous climber or an evergreen climber.

Which works best for you?

Let’s find out. I'm talking with Glenice Buck, Consulting Arborist and Landscape Designer

 

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Stephanotis floribunda is an evergreen climber

Climbers and scramblers are superb additions to the garden.



 

Yes you need to think about do you need leaf coverage throughout the whole year?

 

Evergreen climbers will give you year round shade coverage if you were to grow them over a pergola. 

This is ideal for a north facing location where you need shade all year. 

Evergreen climbers growing along a fence or on a wire across a window will act as an attractive privacy screen. 

 

Deciduous climbers grown over a pergola or awning will allow you to have summer shade and winter sun. 

When the sun is shining they will create a microclimate in your garden to retreat to but when the days are cooler and the sun is lower in the sky the deciduous climber will allow the area to take full advantage of the sun that is available at that time of year.

 

Real World Gardener Red Whiskered Bulbul in Wildlife in Focus

July 3rd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Red Whiskered Bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus)

Not all birds featured in this segment are native, so it’s good to know which ones aren’t.

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Red Whiskered Bulbul



We all know the Noisy Miner bird is a native and the introduced Indian Mynah is not, because they’re so aggressive.

What about a little bird, that’s not that aggressive, doesn’t move to far from its territory and doesn’t make a squawking or screeching sound when it sings?

It has bright red patches at the side of its face, almost like a small dot.

They eat fleshy fruits which is their main food with occasional insects as well.

So let’s not linger any longer and find out all about it.

I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, manager of Birds in Backyards www.birdsinbackyards.org.au

Now you know that the Red Whiskered Bulbul is an introduced species.

These birds were deliberately introduced into NSW in the 1880's and later introduced to Coffs Harbour in NSW in 1918.

Then there was yet another release around Melbourne.

They have been known to occasionally pop up around cities like Perth and Canberra also and are probably cage bird escapes.

The Red-whiskered Bulbuls are non-migratory bulbuls found in tropical Asia - from Pakistan and India through to southeastern Asia and China. They typically roost in loose groups.

In parts of India, these birds were popular cage birds, because of their trusting nature so that they were easily captured.

If you have any questions about red whiskered bulbuls or have some information or a photo  to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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