Real World Gardener Inspired Red Borders for Gardens-in Design Elements

February 5th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

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Hidcots UK Red Border. photo M Cannon

People like to visit gardens to overseas because without looking down our noses at Australian gardens, some of these gardens are really really big, and really really old.

The size of gardens in England for example that I saw this year, was mind boggling, even awesome. But what can visitors get out of these gardens, because they seem to be just too big, with too much to take in.

Well, you can take inspiration from these gardens if you just select one part of them.

This month, Louise and I have been undertaking a trip to a few of these gardens for inspiration.

Listen to the podcast. I'm talking with Garden Designer Louise McDaid

The red border at Hidcote was one fairly small part of the overall garden.

Hidcote in the Cotswalds in England which has a famous Red border , two long wide borders flanking a stretch of lawn – backdrop of tall green clipped hedge behind each border.

 The Hidcote borders have red foliage and red flower plants combined with green.

Structure and height is given by small trees – red leaf Japanese Maples – lovely shape and delicate leaf texture.

In Australia Acer palmatum Osakazuki has brilliant autumn colour – to around 4m tall.

Acer palmatum Sango Kaku (coral bark maple) know for bright red stems so attractive when not in leaf. 

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Hidcote Red Borders Photo M Cannon

The border is made up of shrubs, strappy leaf plants and grasses – many of them with red leaves – and perennials with red flowers such as dahlias (which can have red leaves too!)

But it was a section that could easily be re-created in any garden, even a native garden. What did you think of the plant choices? Are you inspired to plant out a few more red plants-red leaved plants that is in your garden.

Not bright red, but the deep reds of maples and some of the strappy leaved plants.

Real World Gardener Controlling Mealybugs in Plant Doctor

February 5th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT DOCTOR

Mealybugs

mealybug2.jpgHave you ever noticed the leaves of your plants looking a bit more twisted than they should be and down near the base of the leaves there’s this white powder stuff that looks ominous.
This problem is very common on indoor plants and chances are, when you bought the plant home, the pest was already there but in very small numbers.Mealybugs hide in the crevices of the leaves of your plants so that by the time you notice something’s wrong, they’ve done a lot of damage.
Let’s find out more about what it is and what to do…

Listen to the podcast with Steve Falcioni, general manager of eco-organic garden.

Sometimes you can take that indoor plant outside so natural predators can take care of the pest problem.
Mealybugs love nothing more than sucking sap from leaves and stems! 

MealyBugs-on-Orchid-255x300.pngThey are only 0.5 cm in size, oval in shape, pinkish in colour but what you see is the white waxy filament covering. This will always be the female mealybug.

The male mealybug is very tiny at around 1mm.
Exuding honeydew is a special talent of mealybugs, which encourages sooty mould. 
They also release toxic saliva that can seriously damage plants.
Mealybugs really love Citrus plants, orchids, ferns, loads of ornamental plants such as Agapanthus and shade houses. 
They like warm and humid weather… it just makes then breed! 
Oh, and they love ants, because the ants farm the mealybugs for their honeydew.
If you have any questions about identifying mealy bug or how to treat it drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

Real World Gardener Cinnamon Myrtle is Plant of the Week

February 1st, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Backhousia myrtifolia Cinnamon Myrtle.



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Cinnamon Myrtle photo M Cannon

The leaves have a pleasant spicy cinnamon-like aroma and flavour and can be used as a spice in various dishes.

The cream coloured flowers cover the tree from top to toe and are star shaped followed by starry-like capsules.

Only growing to 7 metres eventually, it’s a tree that should be grown more in the home garden.

Backhousia myrtifolia is a small rainforest tree species grows in subtropical rainforests of Eastern Australia.  

Myrtifolia from Latin myrtus a myrtle or myrtle-tree and folium a leaf referring to the resemblance of the leaves to that of the European myrtle.

Cinnamon Myrtle makes a calming medicinal tea and can be added to curries stews and rice dishes, especially steamed rice.

It can be also used in biscuits sweets and in fact anywhere where Cinnamon is used.

CINNAMON MYRTLE, Backhousia myrtifolia is also known as carrol, carrol ironwood, neverbreak, ironwood or grey myrtle and can be found in the rainforests of subtropical Australia from Bega in south coast NSW to Fraser Island off Queensland.

Small tree to 7m tall, leaves are simple, opposite and entire with a fine point and between 5-7cm long

Prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy), well-drained, moist soils and requires well-drained soil in full, or nearly-full sun. Does not like shade.

The foliage when crushed smells a little like cinnamon, or bubblegum.

Flowers are cream/white cymes bunched at branchlet ends from November-January.

Fruit is a small brown capsule ripe March-April.

If you have any questions about Cinnamon Myrtle, or have some information to share, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

Real World Gardener Inspired Japanese Gardens-in Design Elements

February 1st, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

TATTON PARK  is a RHS garden – historic estate with 50 acres (about 20 ha) of landscaped gardens in Cheshire in the UK. Renowned for its glasshouses, the Japanese Garden, and the extensive Kitchen Gardens

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Tatton Park UK. photo M. Cannon

Have you ever travelled a long way to see some great gardens?

Just by chance have you stumbled on one of the world’s best for that particular style?

Seeing lots of gardens up close and personal is something we gardeners like to do and should do.

Plus you learn so much about planting styles that you can reflect on and adapt to your own garden.

Here is one such inspirational garden.

Listen to this podcast…I'm talking with Garden Designer Louise McDaid

The Japanese Garden., was almost certainly the result of Alan de Tatton’s visit to the Anglo-Japanese Exhibition at the White City in London in 1910.

He was inspired - decided to introduce a Japanese garden to Tatton.  

The Shinto Shrine and artefacts in the garden are all reputed to have been brought from Japan, with construction of the garden by a team of Japanese workmen.

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Tatton Park photo M. Cannon

It’s considered to be the finest example of a Japanese Garden in Europe.

The garden is in the style of the tea garden, and doesn’t reflect the strict discipline of other Japanese styles, e.g. the dry garden or the stroll garden. In this form of art, the Japanese garden portrays many scenes that harmonise with nature. The important elements of plants, stones and rocks are carefully placed to produce a natural balance.

This Japanese inspirational garden doesn’t sound too hard to emulate does it?
Some rocks, some maples of different colours and leaf shapes, a tea house, and a bit of clipped Buxus or Azaleas, and hey presto, transformation!

Real World Gardener Dill in cooking in Spice It Up

February 1st, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

Did you know that the earliest known record of dill as a medicinal herb was found in Egypt 5,000 years ago?

What’s even more interesting is that Gladiators were fed meals covered with dill because it was hoped that the herb would give them valour and courage.

There are traditional uses for dill the herb, what about the seed?

Dill seeds were called “meetinghouse seeds” because they were chewed during long church services to keep members awake or kids quiet. The seeds were also chewed in order to freshen the breath and quiet noisy stomachs.

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Dill seed. photo www.herbies.com.au

Dill%2Bflower%2Bhead.jpgDill seed is referred to as a spice and goes very well with coriander. Dill seed is used in Moroccan cooking as well as Vietnamese. Of course those that pickle their cucumber will be using some form of Dill.

Fresh green Dill is the herb and has a slightly anise flavour that goes with smoked salmon, potato salad and much more.

Let's find out more. I'm talking with herb expert Ian Hemphill www.herbies.com.au

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Dill likes to be planted in cool weather.

In warm winter areas that don't experience a hard frost, you can plant dill in autumn or winter.

In cooler areas, plant dill a week or two before your last hard frost.

After the first sowing, plant again every 10 days or so if you need lots of dill for a continuous crop.

For balcony gardeners or gardeners with potted herb garden, when growing in pots, use a deep one so the long tap root has somewhere to go.

Remember that you will eventually have a plant that is about a metre tall so you might want to stake your plant.

The seeds are used in pickling and can also improve the taste of roasts, stews and vegetables.

Try grinding the seeds to use as a salt substitute. Both the flowering heads and seeds are used in flavoured vinegars and oils.

If you have a herb garden, send in a photo or drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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