Real World Gardener Brown Goshawk in Wildlife in Focus

December 4th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
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WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Today I’m introducing a new presenter for the Wildlife in Focus segment which has been in sort of a holiday while I was hunting around for someone to fill the role after ecologist sue Stevens wasn’t able to continue with the segment.

The bird that’s featured is a bird of prey and can easily be mistaken for a couple of other birds that look similar.



Browngoshawk1200.jpg

Brown Goshawk

Let’s find out how to pick which raptor you might find in the sky. I'm talking with Manager of Birds in Backyards, Dr Holly Parsons.

The Brown Goshawk can look similar to a Powerful Owl, and the Collared Sparrowhawk. The Brown Goshawk has a similar face to the Powerful Owl but has a line or brow above the eye and a red-brown collar plus finely barred underparts. The collared Sparrowhawk has very similar colouring but doesn't have the harsh brow.

The major difference between the two raptors is that the Brown Goshawk has a rounded tail and the Collared Sparrowhawk has a squared cut off tail.

powerful%2Bowl.jpg

Powerful Owl Photo: Habitat Network

 On the other hand the powerful owl is much bigger and has striped chevrons on the underparts.

Did you know that the Brown Goshawk is one of Australia's most persecuted raptors. That’s because some people call it a "chicken hawk," which it’s not.

What it really is a natural predator of birds, reptiles, frogs, large insects and mammals up to the size of rabbits.

Yes it’s true they sometimes hunt out your chickens, but that’s because it’s either a juvenile, or sometimes the adults, if they’re extremely hungry due to illness, injury, or extreme environmental conditions where’s there’s not much prey in the wild.

They hunt by stealth, relying on surprise to catch their prey.

The Brown Goshawk's preferred habitat is dry, open eucalypt forest and woodland.

If you have any questions about Brown Goshawks or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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