Real World Gardener Best Fit Gardening Rooftop Gardens in Design Elements

November 8th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

ROOFTOP GARDENING

1-DSC_0244.JPG

 

Continuing with the series on best fit gardening. 
Have you ever thought of using that unused space on a flat roof, if you have a flat roof that is?

You don't have to live in Spain to have a rooftop garden, nor just limit yourself to a line of potted plants.
Why not if you have decent access to your roof and it’s approved for pedestrian traffic (ie, the waterproof membrane is intact, sealed and fully protected).

The only obstacle to using it often comes down to simple lack of shade. Exposed to sun and wind, the area is not going to be inviting unless you can find a way to block out the elements.

Equally, you may have dead space over the top of your garages that could be revamped.
Let’s find out what you can plant up there by listening to the podcast with garden designer Peter Nixon

This is for a fairly exposed situation so that’s why Peter focused on xerophytic plants.
The planting suggestions were Aechmea recurvata Benrathii or falsa Tillandsia-this is a small growing Bromeliad. 
Dykia brevifolia or pineapple dykia.
Alcantarea odorata or giant bromeliad and finally, Tillandsia secunda.
There’s also Crucifix orchids or Epidendrum species and other bromeliads such as Bilbergia pyramidalis and Aechmea recurvata.
If you have any questions about rooftop gardening or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

Real World Gardener Ginger in Cooking in Spice It Up

November 8th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

1-1-DSC_0397.JPG

Zingiber officinale Ginger is in the Zingiberaceae family along with Turmeric, Cardamom and Kenchur.

All of these plants are grown from rhizomes that are harvested.
Ginger was used in Roman times as a food preservative and to help treat tummy upsets.
The Greeks would eat ginger wrapped in bread if they were feeling nauseas.
Eventually  Ginger was added to the bread dough creating that wonderful treat many around the globe love today -gingerbread.
Let’s find out more about ginger by listening to the podcast.

Talking with herb expert Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

1-DSC_0405.JPGFresh ginger can be found in the produce section of most supermarkets and fruit and veg stores. 
Look for smooth skin with a fresh, spicy fragrance. 
Tubers should be firm and feel heavy.
The biggest rhizomes usually mean they’re getting on a bit and mature rhizomes will be hotter and more fibrous that's because they've been left too long in the ground.

Avoid those with wrinkled flesh, as this is an indication of aged ginger past its prime.

Fresh ginger is sweeter and less fibrous.

Use your fresh ginger by peeling and scraping it first to get rid of the outer skin.

Ginger has a tangy flavour profile and is very versatile in cooking.

You can always have fresh ginger on hand by grating some and putting it in an ice cube tray with some water.

You can also preserve ginger by putting cutting pieces in a jar with some Chinese rice wine.

This will keep for a few months.

You can of course grow your own ginger from one of the rhizomes that have sprouted.

 If you have any questions about growing ginger or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

Real World Gardener Happy Wanderer Plant of the Week

November 1st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Happy Wanderer: Native Sarsparilla: Hardenbergia violacea cultivars.

Pea flowers are very attractive and gardeners certainly love their sweet peas.
What about other times of the year?
Yes there’s the pea flowers on your vegie plants like peas and beans but they’re all the same and not that showy.
What you need is something that has lots and lots of flowers all over the bush or climber, so spectacular that everyone who visits wants to grow one themselves.
Let’s find out about them and the many different cultivars by listening to the podcast.. I'm talking with Karen Smith, editor www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

There’s also Hardenbergia violacea Flat White™ and Carpet Royale™ which are fast growing, heavy flowering, shallow rooted plants with long trailing stems forming a dense mat, and unlike most other varieties of Hardenbergia will not climb allowing them to be used in a variety of positions in the garden.
They have large glossy leaves and are available in two different flower colours, white and mauve. 
Once established, they have low water and maintenance requirements.

Hardenbergia-SnowWhiteMS800.jpgHardenbergia%252520close%252520up.jpgHardenbergia violacea Flat White and Carpet Royale are fast growing, heavy flowering, shallow rooted plants with long trailing stems forming a dense mat, and unlike most other varieties of Hardenbergia will not climb allowing them to be used in a variety of positions in the garden.

 

They have large glossy leaves and are available in two different flower colours, white and mauve. Once established, they have low water and maintenance requirements.

A full sun to part shade position is preferred in a wide range of soil types including clay or sand however these cultivars will grow best in an enriched well drained acid soil on a raised bed with a pH of 5.5 to 6.0.

They only have a low frost tolerance when young and can get significant leaf damage but will become hardier with age.

Real World Gardener Best Fit Gardening Focal Points in Design Elements

November 1st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Continuing with the series on best fit gardening. 
Today we’re looking focal points in the garden?

Good garden design has some sort of focal point; something to draw our gaze instead of just randomly looking at a scene but not focussing on anything in particular.

Perhaps a focal point like the fountain in this picture?

1-BOD_1703.JPG

Focal points are some plant, whether it’s a tree or a shrub a water feature or a statue, that draws the eye and gives the garden some sense of design.
How do you know what to choose, especially these days when we have smaller gardens?
I'm talking with garden designer Peter Nixon from www.paradisusgl.peternixon.com.au

The small trees mentioned were Plumeria pudica-the evergreen Frangipani, Synadenium grantii rubra or red south African mild bush; Alberta magna-the Natal Flame Bush for cool temperate to warm temperate regions or don’t go past the double flowering Crabapple-Malus ionensis plena.
If you have any questions about growing small trees for focal points or have a suggestion why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com

Real World Gardener Early Australians Preserves and Pickles in What’s Cooking

November 1st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition

WHAT'S COOKING

If you could time travel to the early to mid-1800s, what kind of things would you expect to find growing in their produce gardens and what kind food would you expect to eat?

1-TAT_1793.JPG

In the What’s Cooking segment, this is exactly what we’re doing; time travelling back to early colonists days in Australia and having a peek at what happened in those kitchens and kitchen gardens.

Would you have guessed that an alligator pear is an avocado?

Or that eggplants, tomatoes, artichokes and other heritage vegies were grown on a regular basis?

Tomatoes were initially not commonly grown but staples such as beans, potatoes and cabbages were the staples in most kitchen gardens.

Pickling and preserving were high on the cook’s to do list when all the produce comes ripe at once.

Salt and vinegar were the main preserving ingredients back then and unlike today, sugar wasn't used at all, the reason being sugar was expensive.

Pickling was in 100% vinegar, but they also used spices to make condiments like Brinjal pickles and Picalilli.

food_group.jpgFermenting vegies such as cabbage was common practise as was storing root vegetables in sand and keeping them in a cool environment such as a cellar.

Wealthier households that could afford sugar were able to make sweet jams and cordials.

Back then of course there was no global trade so once the tomatoes had finished for the season, the early colonists cook wouldn’t be able to get them unless they had been preserved.

If you have any questions about early colonists kitchen gardens or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

« Newer Posts -

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App