Real World Gardener Designing A Garden part 4 in Design Elements

August 7th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REAL WORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 Talking with Landscape Designer Glenice Buck. www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

 

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photo Glenice Buck

Some of the plantings are outlined below.

Shade was needed for the back of the house from the western sun but at the same time the trees couldn't be too large so that they would block the views.

 

Glenice chose Olive trees, alternating these with Crepe Myrtles, underplanted with Buxus and Santolina.

Lower down Glenice used ornamental grasses, Agastache, Sedums, groundcover Geraniums, Salvias and Chrysanthemums.

 

The back section of the garden included an avenue of Manchurian Pear trees.

March%2B2014.jpgIf you want to hear that segment again, go to the website and click the podcast.

 

Not everything is transcribed from the segment, so if you’re looking for something in particular, email or write to me and I can give you more details. realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

 

 

Real World Gardener Winter Rose Care in Plant Doctor

August 7th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

PLANT DOCTOR

Winter Rose Care

 

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Who doesn’t love receiving a bunch of roses?

It certainly puts a smile on your face especially if they’re the fragrant type.

Perhaps we don’t receive them as much as we would like and if that’s the case, you need to grow some roses of your own.

Pruning can seem complicated if you read blogs on the web or books on roses and their care.

Steve certainly advocates the simple approach to winter rose care.

If you’re not that familiar with looking after roses, this next segment has simplified some of the things you have to do to roses in winter in order to have plenty of flowers.

Talking with Steve Falcioni, general manager www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Listen to the podcast for more details.

 

The more you know about your rose the easier the task will be.

For example:

Is your rose once-flowering or remontant (repeat flowering)?

What is its normal growth habit - climber, tall, medium or short bush?

pruning%2Brose%2Bdiag.jpg Do you get frosts in your area? This is very important for the timing of pruning.

Of course the later you leave the pruning, the easier it’ll be to find a bud as they begin to swell.

Pruning cuts are always 1-2 cm above these buds.

 

Just a few major steps first for beginners.

Prune two-thirds of the bush if it's a vigorous hybrid tea, (most commonly grown) otherwise if it's weaker growing than just half to a third.

Floribundas or shrub roses aren't pruned as heavily, but the same principle applies.

Climbers are different, don't prune those long whippy stems but tie them to a support and prune the stems that come off this main branch to about 2-3 buds.

 

If you have any questions about winter rose care or roses in general, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Real World Gardener Grevillea Pink Pixie is Plant of the Week

August 3rd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOKReal World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Grevilleas are well known for attracting birdlife to our gardens and the newer ones have beautiful show flowers that are full of nectar.

Larger flowered species and hybrids such as Grevillea banksii, 'Moonlight', 'Robyn Gordon' and 'Peaches and Cream' are planted in most people’s gardens and are still  in great demand.

But there are small flowering newer hybrids that are covered in small flowers that are just right for the smaller birds in our neighbourhood.

 Which Grevillea is it? Let’s find out, talking with nursery owner Jeremy Critchley www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor www.hortjournal.com.au

 

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Grevillea Pink Pixie

Let's look at some winter flowering grevilleas for your garden and what conditions Grevilleas need to thrive.

Grevilleas prefer a sandy loam or a sandy soil because they like air in the soil, so a light sandy soil is preferable,but you could easily just plant them on a bit of mound mixed with good compost and some light potting mix in it so they  can get established first..

Once established they’ll tolerate dry periods but will want a deep soaking

Grevilleas require low phosphorus, slow release fertilizer so something with a Phosphorus number of less than 1.

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Grevillea Pink Pixie

 

 

Featured Select Cultivar

 

 

Grevillea  rosmarinifolia'Pink Pixie' is a great small sprawling shrub if you are after some winter and spring colour.

Growing to  over a metre tall with narrow linear leaves and dense clusters of pink flowers it’s also dry tolerant and frost tolerant.

Winter spring flowering, hardy, low maintenance & frost tolerant

Some tried and true hybrids:

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Grevillea Sandra Gordon

Grevillea "Misty Pink" is one of a number of large, free-flowering hybrids that are loosely termed "Queensland" hybrids because all have at least one species native to Queensland in their parentage. Most of these plants are characterised by a tall habit, ferny leaves and large racemes of colourful flowers which appear over a long period. Other popular cultivars in this group include G."Honey Gem" (orange), G."Sandra Gordon" (yellow), G."Moonlight" (cream) and G."Sylvia" (bright pink).

 

 

Real World Gardener Designing A Garden part 3 in Design Elements

August 3rd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

DESIGN ELEMENTS

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The property with the bank planted. Photo Glenice Buck

Talking with Glenice Buck, Landscape Designer.

 

Over the last two weeks, a new series about re-working a garden on a farm property.

Landscape designer Glenice has mulled over how the garden should be laid out, what aspect will work to maintain the vast view, and whether plants should be the major plants or the hard-scaping. Plants won out of course.

The scenario is this: the house had been located on a level area almost centred to the entire garden, but had been angled to take advantage of the view.

There is a sloping bank behind the house heading up hill and a sloping bank heading down the hill.

Before deciding on whether to terrace the garden or not, the decision was made to keep the existing mature trees.

But where to next?

A lot of decisions which took at least 6 months of mulling over before deciding on the plan of action.

Gardens are not meant to be hurried. Not like on Garden Renovation TV shows.

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The Set Out photo Glenice Buck

 

To begin with, if you’re re-working or starting a garden, bring in as much soil and compost as you possibly can work with to give your plants a good start.

 

Don’t be tempted to buy just one of this or that.

The designer’s rule of thumb is buy in odd numbers bigger than 1.

 

So if you’re on a budget ,then at least three of everything.

 

 

 

 

Glenice planted out 250 each of Lavender, Salvia and Rosemary!

They were planted out in curves that would all merge together to form a mass planting of silver foliaged plants with purple flowers.

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The bank 6 months later. Photo Glenice Buck

 

 

Real World Gardener Fennel Seeds in Spice It Up

August 3rd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

SPICE IT UP

talking with herb expert Ian Hemphill www.herbeis.com.au

Star Anise, Aniseed and Fennel all have anethole in them which imparts that Aniseed flavour.

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The dried seed that comes from the ferny Fennel herb, has seeds look a lot like cumin seeds, only greener, with an lighter aniseed flavour and a warm, sweet aroma.

 

Fennel seeds are also used in spice mixes such as Chinese five spice and the Indian Panch Phora.

Just a reminder, Phanch Phora consists of Fennel, Cumin, Nigella, Fenugreek and Brown Mustard seeds.

But aside from Asian cooking, what else can you do with this spice and can you grow it at home?

Let’s find out.

 

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1-DSC_1357.JPGYou can use the whole Fennel bulb in cooking. The bulb has a light delicate flavour that can be used in dishes such as lasagne.

 

The fronds of the Fennel bulb can be used in salads and with fish.

 

The Phanch Phora seed blend is fried up at the beginning of a curry and is also good with parboiled potatoes and cabbage.

 

To use fennel seed in your cooking you'll get more flavour out of the seeds by either grinding them or dry frying them.

 

If you don’t have a pestle and mortar, put seeds you want crushed into a sealed bag and bash with a rolling pin or whizz them up in a small, clean coffee grinder.

 

To dry fry, heat up a pan, tip in the seeds and, over a medium heat, brown for a couple of minutes, tossing them around the pan frequently

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If you have any questions about using fennel seeds in cooking, why not email

 

realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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