Real World Gardener Soil Savvy Potting Mixes part 1

July 2nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SOIL SAVVY

with Horticultural Scientist Penny Smith





 

For many years I’ve been wanting a segment which deals with soils by a soil expert.

Here it is at last and for want of a better name we’re calling it Soil Savvy.

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Together with horticultural scientist who specialises in soils, Penny Smith, RWG will be discussing all there is to know about potting mixes.

Covering everything from using the cheap mixes, how long do they last and even to mixing your own.

Today we’re discussing the need for potting mix versus garden soil, and what is it about potting mix that you really need to know.

How often do you repot your plants?

Never? Once in the last 5 years or every couple of years?

composted%2Bpine%2Bbark%2Bfines.png
Some potting mixes only consist of composted pine bark fines

Perhaps more often that?

Growing plants in pots can be hit and miss if you forget to do this one thing and leave that plant coping with slumped potting mix for years on end.

Fertilising and pest control of your pot plants is only one part of the equation to keep those potted plants looking healthy.

Keeping a diary of what you did and when, is also a good idea if you’re saying to yourself, “ I can’t remember when I repotted those plants last?”

Real World Gardener White Throated Treecreeper is Wildlife in Focus

July 2nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

white%2Bthroated%2Btree%2Bcreeper.pngWhite Throated Treecreeper

with consulting ecologist Kurtis Lindsay

People have been fascinated by birds for centuries.

We look at them through binoculars and take photos of them with great big lenses. We even go around recording their sounds.

What have we observed?

We know that birds can fly, and that they can hop around on the ground and in tree branches.

They can even walk or waddle, swim, and dive.

But what about climbing a tree? How and why would they do that?

Have you ever seen a White-throated Treecreeper?

If you did, you’ll know why it is called a "treecreeper". Because it just does what its name suggests, creep up tree trunks, looking for insects and grubs to eat.

white%2Bthroated%2Btree%2Bcreeper1.pngWhen it nears the top of the tree it flies down and starts again from near the bottom of the same or another tree.

Treecreepers have often been confused with woodpeckers, even though Australia doesn't have any of those.

The treecreepers bill is a lot softer than a woodpeckers' bill and they have short stiff tails that helps them to balance.

The white throated tree creeper prefers trees, mostly Eucalypts, that have flaking and peeling bark, such as ironbarks and stringybarks.

Some examples are Eucalyptus nicholi, Eucalyptus pilularis, Eucalyptus viminalis, Eucalyptus crebra.

They nest in hollows of trees, but if you want to encourage tree creepers into your garden, you can build nest boxes specific to tree creepers.

The white throated tree creeper is often seen in the Blue Mountains in native bush and in domestic gardens that are close to native bush.

If you have any questions about Tree creepers, or have a photo of one that visits your garden or nearby why not write in or send in a photo to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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