Real World Gardener Stephanotis is Plant of the Week

February 1st, 2015

EAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith editor Hort Journal magazine. www.hortjournal.com.au

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Stephanotis floribunda photo M Cannon

 

 

Along the same vein as fragrance in the garden, plant of the week not only looks exotic, but for many years, the flowers have been used in bridal bouquets because they’re so lovely.

Even though it prefers warmer climates gardeners is Europe love it so much that it’s sold as an indoor pot plant, even though it prefers to climb.

In fact it’s available there from florists climbing attractively over small frames in pots.

Also known as the Hawaiian Wedding Plant, this plant’s a must for the fragrant garden. 

Stephanotis does really well in pots-in fact flowers more if it's pot bound.

Full sun is best for having repeat flowering during the warm months of the year, but on really hot days over 30 deg. C, give it some shelter either with an umbrella or move it under shade.

Of course if it's in the ground, you will get scorched leaves but the plant will recover.

If growing Stephanotis in a pot, tip prune the tendrils often to promote branching, otherwise you'll have no leaves on the bottom third of your climber.

Stephanotis looks lovely all year round and flowers more than once.

Did you know that the genus name-Stephanotis comes from the Greek words stephanos (crown) and otos (ear), supposedly because the flower tube looks like an ear canal surrounded by a crown of five ear-like lobes.

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Stephanotis flowers photo M Cannon

(Stephanotis is in the dogbane and milkweed family whereas true jasmine (Jasminium officinale) is in the olive family.)

 

 

Real World Gardener Fragrant Garden themes in Design Elements

February 1st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with Lesley Simpson garden designer.

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Do you like fragrance in the garden?

Have you a lot of plants with fragrance?

That includes anything from Lavender and Jasmine to the more exotic like Magnolia champaca or Stephanotis and of course roses.

Do you have enough plants with smell or could you add a whole lot more?

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.comSome plants are no trouble to grow and have the added bonus of perfume.

 

The perfume is of course an adaption by the plant over time, to attract pollinators to the plant in the first place.

 

Not all perfumed plants have fragrance that pleases.

 

Some people detest the common jasmine because of it’s overwhelming scent, and others find that their noses can’t tolerate jonquils if they’re brought into the house.

 

You just need to find the scents that best suits you and your garden.

 

If you have any questions about how to create a fragrant garden why not write in?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real World Gardener Crimson Rosella is Widllife in Focus

February 1st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

with Sue Stevens, ecologist

Not all brightly coloured birds are Lorikeets in Australia.



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Crijmson Rosella photo Ralph de Zilva

Crimson rosellas are kept as pets but they aren’t great talkers.

Rosellas are great whistlers and can learn to whistle songs.

Have you ever heard of the Red Lowry, Mountain Lowry or Pennant's Parakeet? Not sure what that could be?

 

 

 

 

The sound of the crimson parrot was provide by Fred van Gessel of the Australian Wildlife Sound Recording group.

The following research is from Prof. Andy Bennett of Deakin University.

Prof. Bennett says (Beak & Feather Disease virus) BFDV is only found in parrots and how nasty it is varies from species to species. In some species it can be really nasty – leading to extensive feather loss and death.

The Australian Government lists BFDV as a Key Threatening Process to biodiversity under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

Fortunately, it currently appears that BFDV in Crimson Rosellas is rather benign.

If you have any questions about crimson rosellas or have a photo , send it in to to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 



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photo Ralph de Zilva

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