Real World Gardener An Introduction to Trees in Design Elements

November 14th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid

Starting a new series- all about trees – they’re an essential part of a garden’s structure, adding shade, shelter and privacy to name just a few

Do you have a favourite tree and is it growing in your garden?

Or is the tree that you really like something that belongs in a park or nature reserve?

Whatever the case, trees are essential not only for providing animal habitat, food, shelter and nesting sites, but provide us with a few amenities as well, like shade, and beauty.

But how fast do they grow? In this day and age we are moving house more often than we used to, so is it any use planting a tree now when we might not be around to enjoy it?

Yes is the answer, because there are so many benefits that you can enjoy while it’s growing (even if you don’t see it to maturity).

We need to be patient with trees, and generally we’re impatient – we want things to grow fast – but there are some drawbacks with this.

While fast growers are good for the impatient, they are usually short lived – take acacias for example, some may only last around 10 years which is paltry for a tree.

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Where would Koalas be without trees?                               photo M Cannon

In the words of Dr. Seuss character from his book The Lorax

“I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees.

I've come here to celebrate Earth Day, so please Come join me and help spread the message I bring. Be a friend to the trees and to each living thing.”

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Trees provide beautiful flower colour       photo M Cannon

Are you aware that as trees grow they absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and lock it away for decades or even centuries?

All the more reason to plant more trees.

Real World Gardener Sulphur Crested Cockatoo is Wildlife in Focus

November 14th, 2014

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 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

with ecologist Sue Stevens

There’s no denying sulphur Crested Cockatoos are loud and noisy.

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Sulphur Crest Cockatoo photo M Cannon

They’re a bit like teenage larrikins-very social, like to be the centre of attention, fairly friendly but do muck up from time to time.

Sometimes they can be down  right destructive but they’re probably just playing.

You’ll probably me familiar with the high-pitched screeching noises that the Sulphur Crested Cockatoo makes.

Did you know that their screeching is meant to traverse long distances through tropical and subtropical forest environments?

They also make loud and incessant grating calls during the evening when they return home to their nests.

Sulphur-crested Cockatoos mainly feed on seeds of grasses, grains, herbs, wild melons, fruits and vegetables. They also eat flowers, nectar, nuts, cereals, oilseed crops, grapes, berries, orchards, leaf buds, rhizomes, bulbous roots. These cockatoos even prefer to eat certain insects like skinks and crickets as well as small larvae. No white bread in that diet that’s for sure.

If you have any questions about Sulphur Crested Cockatoos, or have an anecdote about their behaviour, even some photos, drop us a line to  2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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