Real World Gardener Plant Bank Australian Botanic Garden Mt Annan

October 19th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

FEATURE INTERVIEW

by Louise Brooks with Manager/Curator Plant Bank The Australian Garden, Mt Annan John Siemon

Have you ever wonder what would happen if we lost a further 50% of living plants here in Australia?





Would they be gone forever or could they regrow themselves?

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Plant Bank Mt Annan-photo Louise Brooks

I’m not being a doomsdaysayer, because the hard facts are, that 50% of the world’s plant species ARE  under threat of extinction?

It could happen through bushfire, mining, over-grazing, or drought.

So what kind of insurance to prevent this happening do we need?

What about a plant bank?

 The Australian PlantBank is a science and research facility of the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust and is located at the Australian Botanic Garden, Mount Annan.

Behind the glass windows are three vaults storing 100 million seeds in temperatures ranging between four to minus 20 degrees.

 

John Siemon, the PlantBank's is the project manager/curator of Plant Bank at Mt Annan.

Trays of small foil packets are carefully numbered and linked to other DNA related samples in the collection.

Inside the bunker a fifth of Australia's 25,000 plant species are represented, including 260 of NSW's rare and endangered species. An insurance policy, if you like, against possible extinction, allowing future scientists to bring back to life native plants for regrowth or medical research.

 

PlantBank houses thermal efficient seed storage vaults, climate controlled glasshouses, and state of the art laboratories.

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Plant Bank Mt Annan-photo Louise Brooks

It houses the Trust's seedbank and research laboratories that specialise in horticultural research and conservation of Australian native plant species, particularly those from New South Wales.If you want to visit the Plant Bank-you can.Plus if you’re a bit tech savvy you can download the new mobile app that takes you behind-the-scenes.

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Plant Bank Mt Annan-photo Louise Brooks

 

You can explore this exciting new conservation centre, including the laboratories and seed vault, the surrounding landscaped gardens and the nearby endangered Cumberland Plain Woodland. If you have any questions about Plant Banks, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Real World Gardener Plant of the Week is Blueberry Burst

October 12th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith editor of Hort Journal magazine. www.hortjournal.com.au

 

BLUEBERRY BURST

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.comBlueberries are the fruit of a shrub that belongs to the heath family includes cranberries, azaleas and rhododendrons.

They are sort of a bluey purple colour have a waxy ‘bloom’ that covers the surface serving as a protective coat.

Did you know that over half of Australia’s Blueberries are grown near Coffs Harbour?

Whenever this fruit is mentioned most people groan because they’d love to grow it but there’s been so many things that just don’t work for where you live.

There’s not enough winter chilling-not enough hours below 70C, or the soil’s just wrong-pH or to clayey or too sandy.

 

In comes a small naturally dwarfing plant that has heaps of fruit, and  that you can grow in a pot and move it around , or you can grow it in the garden.

 Blueberry Burst has been bred in Australia.

It has large fruit size and you’re supposed to get lots of fruit.

The growers say it’s early in season to flower and early to fruit.

What’s really great about it is that it’s an evergreen, so won’t drop its leaves.

Some say that the fruit can be as large as a one dollar coin.

Harvest time is stated to be August September for a cooler Melbourne garden. This is early and we’ll be interested to see how local home gardeners go.

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Blueberry Burst is available from www.plantnet.com.au or from Bunnings stores and garden centres.

Mark Dann from Plant Net recommends that you plant your Blueberry Burst into a pot.

 

However should you try growing your Blueberries in the ground-SOIL STRUCTURE / AERATION  are very important when growing blueberries.

Blueberries have a very fine fibrousy root system, just like Azaleas,  and this root system needs a porous medium in which to grow, a bit like coarse sand from where they came from.

Careful soil preparation is needed if you want to grow them in the ground., you have to make a mound of soil and use lots of mulch. Apparently, growers in the US, use heaps of pine bark mulch to prevent compaction of the soils underneath for the growth and establishment of a healthy root system.

Real World Gardener Spice it Up with Salep

October 12th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.comwith Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

The spice that comes from a particular orchid native to Turkey and Persia, used to be sold at stalls in the streets of London, as a drink.

They called it Saloop or Salep.

It was even held in great repute in herbal medicine.

The best English Salep came from Oxfordshire, but the tubers were chiefly imported from the East. Before the war it was regularly sold by street merchants in Constantinople as a hot drink during the winter.

Now coffee has taken over. But wait, this spice, what happened to that?

 



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Salep tubers



Most of the Orchids native England have tuberous roots full of a highly nutritious starch-like substance, called Bassorin, of a sweetish taste and with a faint, pong.

 

 

 

 

 

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Salep Ice-Cream



 

In the East, Salep is mostly obtained from Orchis morio, which grows best in chalky soils, but according to some sources it can be made just as well from O. mascula, the Early Purple Orchis, O. maculata and O. latifolia, which are more common.

Ian says a cheat's way of obtaining a similar flavour is to use Mastic Tears.

Cheats Salep Drink

Crush a few Mastic tears into some warm milk-say 1 cup.

To this add 1 teaspoon of cornflour.

Simmer until it thickens then pour into a cup and add some cinnamon and crushed pistachio nuts on top.

If you have any questions about where to buy Salep don durama icecream or the drink, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Real World Gardener My Island Home in Design Elements

October 6th, 2014

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with guest landscape designer Phil Withers 

 

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Not that long ago I went to the Australian Garden Show to see what was going on the in garden design world.<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

Sure enough there were some fresh new ideas from around the country.

 

Today is one of three designers that I managed to interview from the show who had on display is concept garden-My Island Home.

So what is concept gardening? Or is it garden conceptualism?

In either case this is design in which a single idea, or concept, is used to underpin everything.

But perhaps the most celebrated conceptualist landscape is the Diana memorial fountain in Hyde Park, England designed by Kathryn Gustafson and Neil Porter. The central concept of this piece was the late Princess of Wales herself; the moods and undulations of the ring-shaped watercourse reflecting the Diana's own life.

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com
 

 

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The coral reel garden is made up of succulents arranged in such a pleasing way that it makes you want to rush out and buy up some of these plants to recreate your own coral reel garden.

Who can resist?

Some of these plants include

Echeveria colorata ‘Mexican Giant’ – large 30cm rosettes, whitish leaves
Echeveria ‘Zorro’ – pinky red leaves with curled edges
Echeveria ‘Tuttifrutti’ – rosettes with a frilled red edge.
Echeveria ‘Afterglow’ – rosette of powdery pinkish-purple with dark pink edge
Echeveria ‘Golden Glow’ - large yellowish rosettes
Echeveria ‘Mauna Loa’ – large frilled edge rosettes colours turn to deep red in sun
Echeveria ‘Violet Queen’ – grey rosette with pinkish tones
Agave parryii (compact form)
Haworthia attenuata – striped stiff green leaves in a small rosette
Aeonium ‘Sunburst’
Euphorbia trigona – angled stems, narrow upright form
Crassula ‘Living Coral’
Sedum rubrotinctum – red jelly beans
Sedum pachyphyllum – jelly beans
Sedum ‘Gold Mound’ – fine golden foliage in mounds
Crassula ovata – spoon-shaped greeny blue foliage
Senecio mandraliscae - blue chalksticks
Senecio serpens – chalksticks
Aeonium ‘Velour’ – loose rosettes with velvety leaves turn dark maroon in cool weather
Kalanchoe thyrsiflora – flap jacks – bluey-green paddle-shaped leaves with red edges
Rhipsalis spp

 

Real World Gardener Tawny Frogmouth is Wildlife in Focus

October 6th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

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Tawny Frogmouth-photo David Little

with ecologist Sue Stevens

 

Tawny Frogmouths can blend into a tree trunk so you wouldn’t know they were there, and they’re often mistaken for Southern Boobooks, but are not owls.

 They’re also members of the nightjar family, and are more closely related to kookaburras and kingfishers than they are to owls. What's a nightjar then?

Just in case you’re wondering what the difference is between an owl and a nightjar: owls will eat animals and birds up to their own size and sometimes larger, while frogmouths are almost exclusively insectivorous; owl eyes face fully forward whilst frogmouths' eyes face mostly to the side; owls have large, powerful feet, while frogmouths have small, weak feet; owls have either a full or partial facial disk, while frogmouths do not; owls have large asymmetrical ears, while frogmouths do not; and owls have twelve tail feathers whilst frogmouths have ten.

If you have any questions or photos of Tawny frogmouths, write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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