Real World Gardener Vegetable Gardens part 3 in Design Elements

December 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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DESIGN ELEMENTS

 Vegetable Garden Series part 3-the planting stage.

Living in a particular place in Australia means that you have a particular climate and also means that if you’re into gardening that you need to know which climatatic zone you are in.

Some books suggest different zones to what you think you are in and in can be a bit confusing .

But it’s important to newbie gardeners to know what climate zone they’re in because it determines the type of garden you’ll have and the plants that you’ll grow.

We’re going through a few basics in this next segments so let’s find out.

 

Private vegetable garden of Lyn Woods in Ulverston Tasmania

I'm talking with Glenice Buck, landscape designer and consulting arborist.

PLAY: Vegetable Gardens pt3_21st December_2016

 

If you’re new to gardening then concentrate on what does well in your area.

Check the Bureau of Meteorology, local gardening groups and local newspapers to build a better picture of your local area.

In Australia we have 4 very broad climatic zones …

Hot tropics/subntropics

Cool Temperate

Arid areas

Hot Temperate

Very broad zones and then within these zones there are microclimates dependent on elevation and proximity to the coast. 

The higher you are the cooler the temperatures and the coast will keep temps more moderate – not as extreme.

These do get broken down into semi arid/arid climates, dry temperate and so on .

Of course every garden has its own microclimate depending if you live in a valley or on a hilltop.

How are vegetable classified or divided up?

Vegetables are basically divided into warm season and cool season

Warm season crops grow best when average temperatures 20 degrees

Cool season crops – best grown below 20 degrees

What are some examples?

Warm season

Tomatoes, sweet corn, French and runner beans capsicum, eggplant, cucumber,

 Cool season

Cabbage broccoli fennel cauliflower, asparagus, Brussels sprouts spinach, and peas.

If you have any questions about designing a veggie garden, write in to reLyn_Woods_Vegie_Garden1.jpg

 

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Real World Gardener Scented Leaves to Brush By in Design Elements

December 2nd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER

Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Scented Leaves to "Brush By."

Continuing the series on scented plants and scented leaves.

 

Lavender.JPG

Lavandula sp. photo M Cannon

1-DSC_0071.JPGWas it a term coined by Peter? It seems likely but until Peter mentioned the term, “brush by” I had never come across it.

In fact if you did a search on the internet for “brush by plants” you get a selection of Bottle Brush plants.

That’s not it. If you put in just “brush by”, you guessed it, a selection of definitions on brushing and websites selling hairbrushes.

So what does it mean? 

Let’s find out..

I'm talking with Peter Nixon, garden designer and project Manager of Paradisus Garden Design. www.paradisusgl.peternixon.com.au

 

 

 

 

Scented leaves on Geraniums, Lavenders, licorice scented leaves of Agastache, and Bee Balm or Bergamot. Just some of the plants to choose from for your brush by garden.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Ruby Red Amaranthus is Plant of the Week

November 24th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Amaranth caudatus_Love Lies Beeding

Described as have brilliant red seed heads that dangle like rubies, the tassles of this flower can reach up to 30cm long.
That means that if you want to display them in a vase, the vase has to be quite tall.
So let’s find out what it is.
I'm talking with the plant panel:Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au
amaranthus_caudatus.png

Did you know that Love-Lies-Bleeding grew in many Victorian English gardens and in the language of flowers, it represents hopeless love.
Tiny blood red petal-less flowers that bloom in narrow, drooping, tassel-like, panicles throughout the growing season.
The tassels contain thousands of tiny flowers and hang straight down to 30cm (occasionally 60 cm) long and look like velvet cords.
Did you know that the red colour of the inflorescences is due to a high content of betacyanins?
This plant grows best in full sun and well drained soil.
It tolerates dry conditions and poor soil, but can’t grow in the shade.
If you have any questions about growing  Amaranthus or Love Lies Bleeding, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com
 

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Real World Gardener GROW Soft Tree Ferns in Plant of the Week

August 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
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PLANT OF THE WEEK

SOFT TREE FERN Dicksonia antartctica

DSC_3280.JPGDicksonia Antarctica is a statement tree which will create a dramatic sense to any garden.

Easily established and maintained, this evergreen tree is guaranteed to intensify your garden.

Let’s find out. I'm talking with the plant panel, Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal

 

www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

Soft tree ferns live in moist areas with high water content in wet sclerophyll forests, along creek beds, in gullies and occasionally at high altitudes in cloud forests

 

Dicksonia tree ferns can grow up to 15m in height; it has large dark green roughly textured fronds in a spreading canopy of up to 6m in diameter.

 

They have an erect rhizome forming a trunk. They are very hairy at the base of the stipe. (trunk). The "trunk" of this fern is the decaying remains of earlier growth of the plant and forms a medium through which the roots grow

Fast Fact:

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Did you know that the soft tree fern doesn’t reach maturity until it’s 23 years old?

 

A lot of places just name this tree fern but you mightn’t want the taller growing coin spot tree fern.

Look for Soft tree fern or Dicksonia Antarctica on the label.

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Real World Gardener Staghorn Fern is Plant of the Week

January 15th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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PLANT OF THE WEEK

Staghorn Fern Platycerium superbum

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Staghorn Fern

They make a nice plant for your balcony, verandah or just somewhere perhaps on a tree in the garden and are very easy to care for. 
They can be grown year-round outdoors in areas protected from frost and freezing. In their natural habitat they can be seen growing high up in the crowns of trees.

Staghorn ferns are native to tropical central Africa including Madagascar, southeast Asia, the Pacific islands and Australia. 
One species is native to the Andes mountains of Peru.

Platycerium superbum has greyish green fronds that lay flat over the root system which is attached to a support.

This fern has two distinct leaf forms.

Flattened sterile shield fronds protect the anchoring root structure and take up water and nutrients. This ‘nest’ frond is designed to collect falling leaves and insects and funnels it to the feeding roots.

This is the place gardeners usually throw in banana peels for the same reason.

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Platycerium superbum

These give the fern a valuable source of potassium and calcium, nutrients required for the production of their large fronds.

It's from this frond that the fern attaches itself to the host tree.

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Real World Gardener Early Australians Preserves and Pickles in What’s Cooking

November 1st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition

WHAT'S COOKING

If you could time travel to the early to mid-1800s, what kind of things would you expect to find growing in their produce gardens and what kind food would you expect to eat?

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In the What’s Cooking segment, this is exactly what we’re doing; time travelling back to early colonists days in Australia and having a peek at what happened in those kitchens and kitchen gardens.

Would you have guessed that an alligator pear is an avocado?

Or that eggplants, tomatoes, artichokes and other heritage vegies were grown on a regular basis?

Tomatoes were initially not commonly grown but staples such as beans, potatoes and cabbages were the staples in most kitchen gardens.

Pickling and preserving were high on the cook’s to do list when all the produce comes ripe at once.

Salt and vinegar were the main preserving ingredients back then and unlike today, sugar wasn't used at all, the reason being sugar was expensive.

Pickling was in 100% vinegar, but they also used spices to make condiments like Brinjal pickles and Picalilli.

food_group.jpgFermenting vegies such as cabbage was common practise as was storing root vegetables in sand and keeping them in a cool environment such as a cellar.

Wealthier households that could afford sugar were able to make sweet jams and cordials.

Back then of course there was no global trade so once the tomatoes had finished for the season, the early colonists cook wouldn’t be able to get them unless they had been preserved.

If you have any questions about early colonists kitchen gardens or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Walking Iris is Plant of the Week

November 14th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.Steaming live on the net at www.2rrr.org.au/player/

 

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au

Neomarica sp. Walking Iris.

Fantastic strap leaf plant to use in the garden as a filler, with beautiful, iris-like flower

Plants are what’s called Heterophs because they make their own food.

They need to of course because they can’t walk to the next meal.

Neomarica.png

 .

Except for this unusual plant that seems to walk.

 

 

 

 

Technically you could say that the walking iris doesn’t actually walk.

Walking iris really only seems to move because the small plantlets that form at the ends of the flower stalk, grow and weigh down the stalk, bringing it to the ground where it will root.

It also grows and spreads from underground stems or rhizomes.

 

 

The Blue Walking Iris is a vigorous growing tropical but surprisingly cold hardy.

Walking iris is clump-forming and its leaves are broad, sword-shaped and pointed at the ends. They grow in flat, fan-like arrangements, as do most members of the Iris family.

The brilliant purple-blue iris flowers are marked with white and burgundy-brown spots and appear in clusters on leafy stems held above the leaves. This species tends to bloom in succession from summer to spring

Neomarica_white.png

It does best in filtered light to part shade. The flowers are short lived but replaced with new flowers throughout late Spring. Be careful not to over water.

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Real World Gardener Zelkova serrata is Plant of the Week

May 4th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com



PLANT OF THE WEEK

Zelkova serrata-Japanese Zelkova
Do you live in an area where deciduous trees give you great autumn colour?

Those turning leaves do give those brilliant, reds, yellows and oranges that make for a standout landscape that artists and photographers can’t resist.

zelkova+serrata.png

Why not have a bit of this in your own backyard.








Zelkova serrata is native to Japan, Korea, eastern China and Taiwan.

Zelkova grows naturally in lowland forests with maple, beech and oak.

Japanese Zelkova is deciduous growing to 18 metres high with a 15 metre spread.
For showy autumn colour - the green leaves turn yellow, copper, orange, or deep red to purplish-red. 
Young trees have smooth grey bark and as the tree ages, the bark peels to reveal orange or pink patches.
Insignificant green flowers in Spring, followed by nut-like fruit or wingless drupes that ripen in Autumn.
Has some possibility as a substitute for the American (Ulmus americana) and English elm (Ulmus procera) because of its resistance to Dutch elm disease which has devastated the trees of the northern hemisphere.

Zelkova can grow quite a large trunk of up to one metre or more in diameter. It has a moderate growth rate and likes a sunny exposure. Tolerates heat and strong winds. Moderately drought tolerant, though intolerant of waterlogged soils.

Wood from Zelkova serrata is very fine grained and highly valued in Japan. Wood from all species of Zelkova is used in cabinet making and inlay work.

Several distinctive cultivars have been developed including Z. serrata ‘Green Vase.’ A good tree for Australian gardens because of its fire retardant properties.

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TIP:Transplants easily.

Zelkova is a funny name, but it’s in the list of Australia’s top ten trees according to the sponsor of last year’s winner of the Chelsea Flower Show.

The won the overall best garden with their Australian Garden entry.

If you have the room, this tree is hardy and moderately fast growing. Why not give it a try?

podbean test

July 15th, 2013

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Real World Gardener Spices it Up with Sumac

May 7th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

The new theme is sung by Harry
Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album
from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Spice it Up

with herb expert and author, Ian Hemphill for Herbies Spices.

sumac fruit close up, natural color

You may not have heard of this spice
before, but prepare to be surprised at what this spice can do. Let’s find out….

The spice is tasty on grilled meats
and fish or as a seasoning for rice. It complements lentils and other beans as
well as vegetables.
Substitute it into any dish that you
need to use lemon juice.
Sumac is used a lot in a tang tomato
appetiser called Za’Atar. I’ll post that recipe up on the web. If you don’t
have a computer, write to me and I’ll send you a fact sheet.
Let me know if you’ve used Sumac
before or send in your recipe to
realworldgardener@gmail.com or by post to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville
NSW 1675, or post them on Real World
Gardeners facebook page, and I’ll post a CD in return.
Za'atar-Tomato Appetizer
2 Tablespoons dried
thyme
1 Tablespoon sumac
2 teaspoons sesame
seeds, toasted
1/2 teaspoon table
salt
1 pint cherry
tomatoes
1 recipe fresh Flatbread
In a small container with a lid,
shake together the thyme, sumac, sesame seeds and salt. This is a Middle
Eastern spice blend called "zaatar."
Cut each of the cherry tomatoes in half
placing them into a medium bowl as you go. Sprinkle with one tablespoon of the
zaatar; toss well. Taste and add more of the seasoning, in small increments,
until you have what you consider a tasty concoction. Serve right away along
with the flatbread allowing diners to pile the tomatoes onto the bread for
themselves.
Makes enough for 4 to 6, depending on
serving size

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