Real World Gardener Why Seaweed Solutions are Great for the Garden

June 8th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

FEATURE INTERVIEW: 

All About Seaweed Products

Is Seaweed Solution Good for Your Plants

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Gardeners want healthy plants

Market research shows us that even though we think we would buy Australian products, we tend to purchase on price.

Does that apply to gardening?

Hopefully you would choose an wholly owned Australian company with only 65 employees, whose name is synonymous with the word seaweed.

Just like we say hoovering instead of vacuuming.

Let’s find out more.. I'm talking with Lisa Boyd, one of the Directors of Seasol and Robyn Stewart the new PR Manager of Seasol.

Lisa said that Seasol is 100% organic. 

SEAWEED SOLUTIONS ARE NOT FERTILISERS. 

Why is that?

Traditional fertilisers have Nitrogen (N) Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K). Seaweed solution has only a very small amount of Potassium.However, seaweed solution can provide benefits that traditional fertilisers can't.

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Brown Kelp washed up on the seashore

So what can seaweed solutions do:

  • They can be used all year round. 
  • They can be used to help plants recover from transplant shock.
  • Help plants get cope disease better.
  • Is taken up by the leaves and the roots of the plants.

Seasol is made from brown kelp that's washed up on the shores of King Island. The collection of kelp is strictly controlled because it provides habitat for the plovers.

Whether or not you use it just a few times or religiously every couple of weeks, the benefits of seaweed solution have been proven to benefit the plant and the soil it grows in If you have any questions about seaweed solutions, or have some information to share, drop us a line to or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener Make Your Own Green Wall in Design Elements

June 1st, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

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Floriade Venlo photo M Cannon

Green Walls

You may not have thought of the idea of having a green wall in your garden.

You might’ve thought that they were really expensive.

 

Some facts first about green walls.

Green walls can provide:

• aesthetic improvements

• protect the building they are attached to because they shield the the building or fence from the sun.

• reduce building heating and cooling costs due to increased insulation

• increased property value

• a place to grow food

• rain water run-off management and water filtering/pollution reduction

• habitat creation and increased biodiversity

• cooling effect

• cleaner air, with less pollutants

 

But did you also know that green walls suit any size garden, even if you have a large garden?

Why?

How do you achieve this?

 

Let’s find out? I'm talking with Peter Nixon from Paradisus garden design. www.peternixon.com.au

 You can make your own green wall using recycled material or you can buy ready made ones from the big box stores that have garden supplies.

They’re fine too.

If you have any questions about green walls, why not contact Peter or email us here at realworldgardener@gmail.com

 
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Real World Gardener Winter Gardening in The Good Earth

May 19th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

THE GOOD EARTH

Preparing for Winter Vegetables

 

Growing winter vegetables is different from the warmer months of the year because you have different amounts of sunlight, cold winds, and in some districts, frost to contend with.

Then there's controlling plant diseases in your veggie patch?

How well do you know your plant families?

Did you know that you shouldn’t plant veggies from the same plant family in the same spot year after year?

That’s all part of crop rotation which means of course you need to know your plant families.

There’s good reasons for practising crop rotation, but what if you only have enough room for a couple of veggie garden beds, what does a gardener do?

Let’s find out..

 

PLAY: Preparing for winter veggies_10th May 2017

 

That was Margaret Mossakowska, director of www.mosshouse.com.au and Permaculture North Course coordinator.

Soon you’ll be saying things like Brassicas, Solanacea, and Fabaceae with ease and know what veggies belong to these families.

Brassicas are all the cabbages, broccoli, kohlrabi, brussel sprouts and cauliflowers.

Solonaceae are the tomates, capsicums, peppers, chillies and potatoes.

Alliums, the garlic, leeks and onions,

Fabaceae or legumes, peas,and  beans,

 

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Created by Margaret Mossakowska

 

Margaret’s tip to fertilise your garden is to use your homemade compost or if you don't have any than add fertilisers like pelletised chicken manure or chook poo. This is important for members of the Brassica family because the grow a lot of greenery.

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Margaret's garden

I’ll be posting an image of the crop rotation diagram that Margaret mentioned at the beginning of the segment on my website blog post page.

 

If you have any questions about winter veggie gardening or have some information to share, drop us .

 
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Real World Gardener Which Fertiliser to Use in Plant Doctor

May 10th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT DOCTOR

Fertilisers explained-granular or liquid, seaweed or organic, which is it to be?
How well do you know your fertilisers
?

There are two basic groups of fertilisers, solids or granular which are generally more slow acting, and liquids which are fast acting.

Whether you add organic matter or fertiliser to your soil, you provide your plants with three basic building blocks.

 

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Controlled release fertiliser and Blood 'n Bone 

 

These are nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, often referred to by their chemical symbols of N (nitrogen), P (phosphorus) and K (potassium or potash).

Packaged fertilisers list the amounts of NPK each product contains, often showing it in a ratio format, called the NPK ratio.

But which ones should you use?

 

Let’s find out.. I'm talking with Steve Falcioni General Manager from www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

 

What to Watch Out For?

For gardeners in cooler climates, the winter period will see plant growth and microbial activity in the soil slow down.

What are the implications?

Nutrient uptake by plants is minimal if you're still using granular or solid type of fertilisers at this time.

The reason?

1-HOM_5247.JPGBulky fertilisers need to be converted into a useable form before plant roots can take them up. So, if microbial activity, which does this conversion has slowed down to a crawl, so will this conversion and that leads to slow nutrient uptake.

Rock dust is the slowest of all to break down taking up to 6 months or more, depending on when you apply it.

The way plants use nutrients is quite complex and varies from plant to plant. 

Some need lots of one nutrient but little of another, while others need a balanced amount of each. Understanding which nutrient does what gives you a rough guide to selecting the right fertiliser for your plants and garden.

That's why some fertilisers are labeled Citrus and Fruit, or Flower and Fruit, or Azaleas and Camellias. They are specific to those plants.

Seaweed extracts don't have enough nutrients in them to be classed as fertilisers, but they are plant tonics because they increase root growth and stimulate plant cell walls to strengthen.

If you have any questions about fertilisers or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675 and I’ll send you a packet of seeds.

 
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Real World Gardener NEW Salvias are Plant of the Week

April 7th, 2017

PLANT OF THE WEEK

New Salvias-Salvia "Black and Bloom."

 

Plant breeders are always looking for new varieties of existing plants for qualities such as larger flowers, longer flowering, disease resistance, more compact and in some cases self-cleaning.

But if you’re looking for plants that flower all year round with the minimum of care, then listen in carefully to find out what are some new varieties of an long flowering compact perennial.

Let’s find out about this plant.

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Salvia Black and Bloom and Salvia Black Knight photo M Cannon

 

 

I'm talking with the plant panel:Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Play: NEW Salvias_29th March 2017

Jeremy mentions two salvias:

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Salvia Black and Bloom photo M Cannon

  • Victoria Blue-is an old school Salvia.
  • Salvia "Black and Bloom." supports The Foundation for Mental Health.

Black and Bloom is very vigorous and the flowers are a true blue and black.

This one self layers.

Many small growers grab anything they can call ‘new’ without knowing much about the plant. 

Some people love to put new names on salvias which causes terrible confusion for the gardener.

But whatever you call them, they are rugged plants which grow in just about anything from rubbly clay. friable perfect loam, providing they are well drained or even sandy soil.

So get to it and grab some of those new salvias.

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Real World Gardener 11th February 2017

April 7th, 2017

DESIGN ELEMENTS

What To Do In The Autumn Garden? Mulching

Do you mulch your garden? I hope you all answered, yes?

If you do what sort do you use?

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Homemade mulch using an Hansa chipper. photo M Cannon

 Do you use black plastic, pebbles, gravel, scoria?

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Paths needing mulching photo M Cannon

Or do you use pine bark fines, leaf mulch, or your own shredded green waste?

There’s quite a few to choose from and quite a few to steer away from.

Let’s find out why.

PLAY: Getting Your Garden Ready for Autumn Part 2_22nd March 2017

That was Glenice Buck consulting arborist and landscape designer from www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

The reasons for mulching is to keep the soil moist when it’s hot, and to keep the soil warm when it’s dry, in other words, it’s keeping the soil temperature constant. 

Mulch keeps weeds at bay

Mulch is a good all round gardening task, but mulches free of viable weed seeds, such as leaves, good compost, and wood chips are best.

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Real World Gardener Gardening After Heavy Rain

March 30th, 2017

`REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

THE GOOD EARTH

GARDENING AFTER HEAVY RAIN.

If your district was lucky enough to have lots of rain over the last few weeks, that I hope your garden is exploding in colour and lush green growth.

My district has been deluged with rain with accompanying high humidity, so gardening isn't all that pleasant still.

Of course after all that rain, along with the longer days of the season, means the weeds will start sprouting with a vengeance

So what are some tips to watch out for if you plan to go gardening after heavy rain.

Let’s find out about this plant.Kifsgate_web.jpg

I'm talking with Margaret Mossakowska of www.mosshouse.com.au

Play: Gardening After Heavy Rain_22nd March 2017

Luckily, rain softens the soil, making weeding much easier on the hands and back. Tackle them now while they're seedlings to prevent them from taking over your garden.

Then spread some mulch.

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Real World Gardener What Is Wrong with My Worm Farm?

March 9th, 2017

LIVING PLANET

What Went Wrong with My Worm Farm?

 

So you’ve now got a worm farm but you open the lid one morning and there’s a mass of short fat white wriggling things?

Too awful to contemplate so I'm not posting a picture of the maggots.

Instead, here's a photo of the nice worms that you should have in your worm farm.]

 

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You’re of course horrified and think “How did they get there and why? "

So now let’s find out. '

I'm talking with Sophie Goulding, environment project officer with a local council.

 

You need to get rid of those wriggling things because they’re maggots and they're there because probably you put that dairy or meat product into the worm farm.

Perhaps you did it on purpose knowing that your chooks will really appreciate a feast of protein that those white maggoty things have plenty of.

But if you didn’t, you’re best bet is to remove the maggots and put them into a small bucket.

Leave them to fry in the sun before adding them back to the compost.

If you don't get rid of them they'll get rid of your worms and there goes your worm farm.

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Real World Gardener What to Put in Worm Farms in Living Planet

March 2nd, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

LIVING PLANET

Are you still wondering whether or not to start a worm farm?

Here’s some food for thought.

Worm farming allows us to recycle our food scraps and significantly reduce the amount of organic waste sent to landfill as part of our everyday rubbish.

worm-farms.jpg

 

By reducing organic waste to landfill we can reduce the potential for landfills

to create liquid ‘leachate’ which can pollute our streams, oceans and underground water, and reduce the production of methane gas which is a powerful greenhouse gas.

So now let’s find out what to put in them.

 

I'm talking with Sophie Goulding, environment project officer with a local council.

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Place your worm farm in a shady spot and always check your worm farm after heavy rain to make sure that it hasn't flooded with water and is drowning your worms.

The worms don’t create the minerals out of thin air but change their form from insoluble to soluble by digesting them.

That’s reason enough to get into worm farming.

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Real World Gardener Peppercorn Tree is Plant of the Week

February 7th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Peppercorn Tree Schinus molle var. Areira

Large trees provide lovely cool shade in the heat of summer and what’s not to love about a tree with drooping ferny leaves that keeps you cool?

You see these trees on rural properties lining the driveway leading to the home, but should they be grown at all?

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Peppercorn Tree

Let’s find out about this plant. I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

The Peppercorn tree is evergreen and grows to about 10 metres.

Bear in mind that this tree spreads readily by seed; is invasive in a variety of habitats including grassland, woodland and riparian areas; and is regarded as an environmental weed in most Australian states.

The berries from the peppercorn tree have been dried and ground for use

as pepper, but are not the source of traditional pepper.

 

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Peppercorn tree.

 

 

From Grow Me Instead choose an Acacia, or Eucalyptus torquata.

 

 
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