Real World Gardener Amazing Sage in Spice it Up

August 17th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

Sage

1-ADE_3354.JPGSalvia officinalis

What would you say to a herb that can remove grease from plates?

Not only that, drinking tea made from the leaves of this herb helps treat sore throats and coughs; often by gargling.

All these attributes are for the herb sage.

To get grease off your dinner plates without using harsh chemicals all you need to do is macerate some fresh sage leaves and rub them on the plates, and voila', clean plates.

But did you know that the world's best sage comes from the Dalmation coast growing amongst rocks on the island of Kornati?

Find out more by listening to the podcast.

1-Salvia_officinalis_sage.jpg

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill www.herbies.com.au

PLAY: Sage_9th August 2017

 

Scientifically known as Salvia officinalis, sage is closely related to rosemary, and they’re often considered “sister herbs.

Sage grows best in sandy, alkaline soil.

It grows up to 75 cm in height and has woody, branching stems.

Its pebble-like patterned, aromatic leaves are grey-green, with a soft surface and fine hair-like filaments growing on either side.

During summer, the violet-blue flowers attract bees.

If you have any questions about sage the herb, why not email us realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 
00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Make Your Own Gin in Spice it Up

July 13th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s editionSPICE IT UP

Juniper Berries.

You probably missed it but 14th June was World Gin Day.

Why I mention this is because Australia is producing some of the best gin in the world.

You heard right, there’s a micro distillery industry that’s sprung up in Australia for making boutique gin.

Gin_and_tonic.jpg

 

But here’s the thing, it’s been said before on this show, you can make your own gin.

So let’s find out more.

I'm talking with  Ian Hemphill Owner of www.herbies.com.au and author of The Herb and Spice bible.

 

PLAY: Juniper Berry 2_5th July 2017

Why everybody is falling in love with juniper today is because it's a thing to make your own gin.

Relatively a cinch but you need a good recipe.

You'll find one on Ian's site, just search for GINSPIRATION.

Australia's leading gin distilleries combine spices such as a cardamom, cinnamon and star anise with Australian oranges, Tasmanian Pepperberry leaf and lemon myrtle, a native Australian plant.

The juniper is still there but it is layered with a blend of modern Australian flavours, Southern European citrus and South East Asian spice, all of which makes it an entirely too drinkable gin.

Cooking with Juniper

Juniper berries go great in slow cooked casseroles and stews.

Juniper berries are also tasty when cooked with Salmon. Just place a few berries in with other herbs such as garlic, dill and add some lemon slices when baking or roasting whole salmon.

Jumiper%2Bberries%2Bon%2Bbush.jpg

Juniper berries

If you have any questions about making your own gin, check out “ginspiration” or Ian’s webpage, or email us realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Selim Pepper in Spice it Up

June 30th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

Xylopiaaethiopica-selim%2Bpepper.jpgSelim Pepper,  Xylopica ethiopica

Are you a bit of a kitchen whizz with a kitchen garden full of exotic herbs?

Or do you just rely on the same old staples of spices like, rosemary, oregano, parsley, sage, maybe some chilli pepper or paprika occasionally.

To be confident about using other spices you need to know a bit about them and sometimes, a bit of advice on how to use an unusual spice will give you the kick a long that you need to try something in that casserole or stew that you always make.

So let’s find out more about one such spice. 

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, spice guru and owner of www.herbies.com.au who has also written the Herb and Spice bible.

 

PLAY: Selim Pepper_14th June 2017

 

Selim pepper is also known as African pepper, Ethiopian pepper, Grains of Selim, Uda Pods, Guinea pepper, kimba pepper and Senegal pepper.

 

Not only is this spice hand picked but it’s possibly one of the rarest spices that Ian’s company has sourced for some time, so that in itself is something to want to try at least.

To use this spice crush the pods in a mortar and pestle then separate the fibrous bits out and use the remaining powder.

xylopica%2Behtiopica2.JPG

Xylopica ethiopica

You can just throw in the whole pods then remove them when cooking has finished.

Ian says the flavour won't be as strong if you do that.

Selim pepper is not as hot as Grains of Paradise and is good in long slow cooking as with the African Buka stew made with beef.

The plant is not grow in Australia and it's unlikely that your supermarket will have the spice, so you’ll have to order it online from Herbies Spices

If you have any questions about Selim Pepper, or have some information to share, drop us a line to or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Lemon Verbena in Spice it Up

April 17th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s

SPICE IT UP

Lemon Verbena Alloysia citriodora (syn. Lippia citriodora)

This is a herb with a multitude of uses;

1-HEN_5793.JPG

Lemon Verbena photo M Cannon

 

There are a few plants whose leaves are great in cooking, making herbal teas and when the leaves are dried, they’re good for a number of things including pot pourri.

So many uses for just one plant, let's find out more?

 

Ian's mum and dad had a grove of 12 Lemon Verbena trees that grew to 2 metres in height.

The leaves were harvested to make sleep pillows and pot pourri.

Lemon verbena pillows sound devine.

They ‘re made of dried leaves of Lavender (Lavandula vera is the best) to help you sleep, Rose petals for sweet dreams and Lemon Verbena, to help you wake refreshed.

Chopped finely, it makes a neat substitute for lemon zest.

1-HEN_5798.JPG

Lemon Verbena Tea photo M Cannon

Try Lemon Verbena tea; it's very refreshing or make Panna Cotta infused with Lemon Verbena.

To prune your Lemon Verbena tree, just take of the top one-third of the tree.

When it re-shoots in Spring tip prune the branches regularly to keep it bushy.

If you have any questions about growing or using Lemon Verbena, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Cubeb Pepper in Spice It Up

April 7th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

Cubeb Pepper (Piper cubeba)

 

Once upon a time, real pepper was adulterated with this spice because it was thought of as perhaps not inferior, but certainly it was cheaper than pepper.

In fact, this pepper was banned by the Venetian Spice Traders!

Why was that?

1-cubeb%2Bpepper2.jpg

Cubeb pepper (Piper cubeba) photo M Cannon

Now the tables are turned and there aren’t too many places where this spice grows and even less places where you can buy it.

Let’s find out what it’s all about.

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, Director of www.herbies.com.au

PLAY: Cubeb Pepper_29th March 2017

 

Cubeb pepper grows as a vine with heart shaped leaves, mostly in the Indonesian Archipelago.

1-cubeb%2Bpepper3.jpg

 

Interestingly, it's similar looking to pepper ixcept for that spiked tail.

 

Did you know that the spice blend Ras el Hanout has 20-30 different spices in it and Cubeb Pepper is one of them?

As Ian mentioned, don’t put cubeb pepper in the peppermill and use ¼ teaspoon of this pepper with 1 teaspoon of normal ground black pepper.

Great for those pepper steaks, slow cooked meals and with rich meats such as pork,duck game.

If you have any questions about where to get Cubeb pepper, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Fish Tamarind in cooking in Spice It Up

November 9th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

Fish Tamarind: Kokum Spice: Garcinia indica

garcinia%2Bindica%2Bplums.jpg
Garcinia indica plums

The seed of the fruit of the plant Garcinia indica, contains enough oil (23–26% oil, so that it remains solid at room temperature.

The name Fish Tamarind refers not to the taste but to the fact that it's traditionally used in fish curries.

It’s used in the preparation of confectionery, medicines and cosmetics.

Let’s find out what else it can be used for.

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of Herbies Spices and author of the Herb and spice Bible.www.herbies.com.au

The tree is ornamental, growing 5-6 metres, with a dense canopy of green leaves and red-tinged, tender, young leaves.

1024px-Garcinia_indica_-_fruits%252C_seeThe fruits look just like a plum.

The spice is mainly from the skin of the fruit, although sometimes it's the whole fruit.

When the whole fruit is sliced and dried it may be referred to as Kokum flowers.

Garcinia%2Bindica%2Btree.jpgSalt is used to assist in drying the skins and what you are left with is a leathery round fruit.

Quite tasty on its own but when added to cooking it adds acidity with a fruity background.

You can put 3 or 4 bits of Kokum in a curry.

The oily extract called kokum tel is used in foot massage, and to treat burns. You can catch up that segment by listening to the podcast www.realworldgardener.com

If you have any questions about Kokum or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Grains of Paradise in cooking in Spice It Up

October 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

grains-of-paradise.jpgQuite a few hundred years ago pepper wasn’t so available so it was really expensive.

So what did spice merchants do to get the most out of this rare commodity?

They adulterated it with this Grains of Paradise, a particular spice that was considered inferior to pepper.

Now the tables have turned and this spice is the rare commodity and  it definitely isn’t used to bulk up your pepper corns.

Let’s find how to use it.

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of www.herbies.com.au and author of the Herb and Spice bible.

The Grains of Paradise plant looks just like a Cardamom plant with those mid green strappy leaves. The main difference is that the flower stems are  hidden down inside the leaves.

Afromomum%2Bmalegueta.jpg

Grains of Paradise plant

Grains of Paradise is still wild harvested and no commercial way of growing the plant has been formulated.

Although Ian recommends using Grains of Paradise in slow cooking, there are recipes on the web which suggest you can rub the ground grains onto your steaks, kebabs and fish before throwing them on the Barbie.

There’s even recipes which include the grains in marinades for vegetables, fish and chicken or in a lemon vinaigrette.

If you have any questions about Grains of Paradise or have some recipes to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Juniper Berry in cooking in Spice It Up

September 9th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

Juniper Juniperus communis

 

This small tree is native to desert regions so it’s hardy and drought-resistant.

But not only does this tree give your garden an interesting focal point with its fibrous and furrowed bark and attractive needles, the dried berries can be used to give your homemade gin its distinctive flavour.



Juniper-Berry2.jpg
Juniper berries have a bloom.



 Conifers in general have pine cones however the Juniper bush has what appears to be fleshy berries with a large seed inside.

The berry  of the culinary Juniper, Juniperus communis, is somewhat smaller than a blueberry and and about the same size as an Allspice berry.

Let’s find out what it is. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of Herbies Spices and author of the Spice Bible

Juniper%2Bbush.jpgIan says Juniper berries are a demon to harvest because they don't all ripen at once, and the needles on the Juniper tree are very prickly, so you need protective gloves.

Make Your Own Gin

The berries can be used to flavour your own gin.

Start with some vodka to which you can add whole Juniper berries, some Coriander seed, and Grains of Paradise. You can crush the berries in a mortar and pestle if you wish.

Cooking with Juniper Berries

The piney flavour of the berries help to balance foods that are rich or cloying, such as Duck or Pork.

Juniper berries go great in a meat pie either used whole or crushed.

Juniper Trees

Unlike other conifers that have either needles or scales, juniper trees have both, sometimes on the same branch.

The needles have sharp edges and a pungent, distinctive scent, sort of like Rosemary with Citrus undertones.

The berries look like smaller blueberries, juniper berries also appear in red or copper, and are in fact soft cones.

Like typical hard and prickly conifer cones, juniper berries also contain the tree's seeds.

You can catch that up by listening to the podcast www.realworldgardener.com

If you have any questions about growing Juniper Berries or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675 and I’ll send you a packet of seeds.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Paprika in cooking in Spice It Up

August 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

PAPRIKA Capsicum fruitescens.

Paprika is the most popular of spices and is found in many spice blends, especially for meat.



The Paprika fruit looks like a long and narrow chilli, but the Spanish variety is like a slightly squashed capsicum.

Alma%2Bpaprika.jpg
Paprika Red Banana



Paprika%2Bred%2Bbanana.jpg
Alma Paprika



 

The top quality grades of Paprika are called "Noble Sweet" and these have the best flavour.

 

Without this spice Hungarian goulash, Spanish chorizos and Indian tandoori chicken just wouldn’t be the same.

COOKING TIP:

Be warned, only use Paprika that's labelled Hungarian Sweet Paprika in your Goulash, otherwise the taste will be quite strong and unpleasant.

It's so famous in Hungary that there’s even a Paprika Museum in the town of Kaloscsa.

Let’s find out.. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of www.herbies.com.au

 

That town in Hungary that Ian mentioned holds an annual Paprika festival every October.

Magyar-Hungarian-paprika-dried-peppers-a

Not only that, in the villages of Szeged and Kalosca, peppers are threaded onto long pieces of string and hung up to dry outside the houses and from garden fences.

Fun Fact:For those in the know, they can tell when the Paprika is the correct amount of dryness from the sound the dried Paprika makes when the wind rattles the peppers!

Cooking isn’t the only way Paprika is used.

Did you know some zoos use it mixed in with the feed to keep the bright pink hue of flamingoes!

If you have any questions about Paprika or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Rosemary in cooking in Spice It Up

June 24th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

1-rosmarinus2.JPG

Rosmarinus officinalis

Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis

The culinary Rosemary plant is often used for remembrance but did you know that the tradition of laying sprigs of this herb(rosemary) across the coffin or upon a tombstone dates back to ancient Egypt?

Rosemary is a lovely evergreen perennial herb with culinary, aromatic, and medicinal uses, and one of the favorites in herb gardening around the world.

So let’s not linger any longer and find out all about it. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill owner of Herbies Spices. www.herbies.com.au

You might be surprised to learn that Rosemary is in the mint family, but unlike mint, likes much drier conditions.

Rosemary balances very will with carbohydrates and is good with pork and duck dishes.

1-rosmarinus.JPG

Rosemary bush

Ian gave us a great tip about how to strip the leaves off the rosemary stem without getting that heel of bark by tearing in an upward motion.

when using dried rosemary either chop it very finely or grind the leaves to a powder.

Normally grinding herbs is not recommended, but unless you're doing a long slow cook, the hard leaves are best treated this way. 

After all, Rosemary has a very strong flavour and can withstand being used this way.

 

Ian's mother's scone recipe.

  • 2 cups of self raising flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of butter (cold)
  • 3/4 cup of milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh Rosemary. 
  • Rub the butter into the flower then gradually add the milk to get a stiff dough. Don't overmix. 
  • Rest for 10 minutes.
  • Pat down or roll out the mixture  so it's 2 cm high then using a scone cutter,(one with a deep edge. a small baked bean tin is a good alternative.)
  • Place them onto a tray close together.
  • Brush with milk and place in the oven at one level above the centre.
  • Bake for 15 - 20 minutes at 160 degrees Celsius.

Growing and propagating Rosemary plants is pretty easy and every garden should have at least one plant, even if it’s in a pot.

The leaves and flowers can also be used to make a tea, said to be good for headaches, colic, colds as well as depression.

If you have any questions about growing and using rosemary in your cooking or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

- Older Posts »