Real World Gardener Sweet Williams in Talking Flowers

November 24th, 2017

TALKING FLOWERS

Sweet William

Sweet William

Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William)  is a species of Dianthus native to southern Europe and parts of Asia which has become a popular ornamental garden plant.

Sweet Williams flowers are in the Caryophyllaceae family.

Sweet Williams are herbaceous biennials or short-lived perennial plants growing to 13–90 cm tall, with flowers in a dense cluster of up to 30 at the top of the stems.

Each flower is 2–3 cm diameter with five petals displaying serrated edges. 

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Mercedes recommends that you strip the leaves off the stalk before putting in a vase with water only midway up the stems.

Flowers should last 6 - 10 days in the vase.

I'm talking with Mercedes Sarmini of www.flowersbymercedes.com.au

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Real World Gardener Carnations for Love in Talking Flowers

November 9th, 2017

TALKING FLOWERS

Carnations

There are a lot of meanings for the carnation flower and each one varies with the different colours.

The scientific name of the carnation is Dianthus caryophyllus.

This translated means the "flower of love" or "flower of the gods" and one of the oldest cultivated flowers in the world.

The carnation dates back to the Roman era.pink-carnations.jpg

Carnations take up food dye very well so that the green carnations you see people wearing on St Patrick's Day is dyed that colour.

Carnations are easily grown in the home garden preferring limey  or alkaline soil.

Home grown carnations have a stronger scent than those grown in greenhouses.

 

All the more reason to grow your own.

I'm talking with floral therapist Mercedes Sarmini of Flowers by Mercedes

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Real World Gardener Poppies for Remembrance in Talking Flowers

October 19th, 2017

TALKING FLOWERS

Poppies for Remembrance

Poppies were given the official title of Remembrance due them growing en masse in the fields where thousands of soldiers perished in WWI

Mercedes has an interesting anecdote about how you can make your dreams come true.

All you need to do is to whisper your dreams into your hand with the poppy seeds before sowing.

When the poppies grow and flower, your dreams shall come true. Let's hope.

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Some of the most widely used grown types of Poppies include the Papaver somniferum ( only by licence because that's the Opium poppy), Papaver orientale, and Eschscholzia californica or Californian poppy.

I'm talking with Mercedes Sarmini from www.flowersbymercedes.com.au

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Real World Gardener Australian Garden Idea in Garden History

May 25th, 2017

 

GARDEN HISTORY

The Australian Garden Idea

Australians love to travel, more so now than ever before.

Often in our travels we love to see other gardens, whether in passing or on purpose.

We might fall in love with a particular plant of group of plants or we might want to copy a particular style.

In the early days of Australia, a lot of gardens were influenced by gardens overseas, particularly England and Europe, but more recently the influence has shifted to Asian gardens like Bali or Polynesia.

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Australian Garden entry Chelsea Flower

Show photo M Cannon

So then you have to ask the question, what makes an Australian garden?

Let’s find out.. I'm talking with Stuart Read, Landscape Historian and on the National Management Committee of the Australian Garden History Society.

 

PLAY: Australia Garden Idea_17th May 2017

Australia’s amount of sunlight, type of soil and drier climate has meant that we’ve had to adapt garden design so that it can survive.

Stuart says Australians want to produce the look, but what that is, we're not quite sure of.

Does a garden have to have Australian plants to be an Australian garden? Possibly.

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Australian Garden entry Chelsea Flower

Show photo M Cannon

However many European plants blend in quite well, and these days, Plant Breeders in Europe are growing new or different forms of Australian plants and shipping them back to Australia.

Minimalism has been in vogue for the last twenty years in Australia, however, Stuart points out that it was actually started in the mid 17th Century by Georgian gardens.

Of course gardens in Tasmania and Victoria can emulate the English garden reasonably easily, to the envy of northern gardeners.

 

If you have any questions what makes an Australian garden or have some information to share, drop us a line to or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675 and I’ll send you a packet of seeds.

 
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Real World Gardener NEW Garden History an Introduction

March 30th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. WHAT IS GARDEN HISTORY ALL ABOUT?

Introduction to the Garden History Society

Many people might consider that Australia is too young a country to have historic gardens.

I daresay that's true when compared with England where there are beautiful gardens as featured in this photo, which I took when visiting a few years ago.

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photo M Cannon

However,, there is a Historic House Trust in Australia, and with them there are historic gardens.

Some of them have fallen to neglect and some have been restored or are in the process of being restored by members of the "Garden History Society."

So it would seem that there are indeed many historic houses in Australia, and there are plenty of early 20th century houses which would look so much nicer with a complimentary garden.

There are also hidden gems in our country which aren’t normally open to the public, so how can we see them.

Let’s find out what the "Garden History Society" is and how we can see hidden gems..

I'm talking with Stuart Read, Landscape Historian and member of the national management committee of the www.gardenhistorysociety.org.au

There are branches around Australia of the Australian Garden History Society, but you don’t have to be a member to go along to one of their talks, activities or events.

If you have any questions about the History of Australian gardens, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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