Real World Gardener What Does An Arborist Really Do?

July 11th, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

1-Kauri%2BPine.jpgWhat Does an Arborist or Consultant Arborist Do?

 

This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Did you know that there was an Institute of Australian Consulting Arborists?

So what is a consulting arborist and can they cut down your trees if you want them too?

Let’s find out?

 

If you’ve been asked for an Arborist Report, a Tree Report or an Arboricultural Impact Assessment then a consulting arborist is the best person to call because they often prepare these reports for clients with respect to trees for a range of reasons.

And where do you find these consulting arborists? 

Look no further than the Accredited Members of the Institute of Australian Consulting Arboriculturists (IACA) (www.iaca.org.au ) provide written reports for their clients in the public and private sectors. IACA members do not undertake tree pruning or removal work.

The other organization is Arboriculture Australia which also lists consulting arborists.

www.arboriculture.org.au

 

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photo Capel Manor College-Arborist Course.

And where do you find these consulting arborists?

Look no further than the Accredited Members of the Institute of Australian Consulting Arboriculturists (IACA) (www.iaca.org.au ) provide written reports for their clients in the public and private sectors. IACA members do not undertake tree pruning or removal work.

The other organization is Arboriculture Australia which also lists consulting arborists.

www.arboriculture.org.au

 

If you have any questions about what arborists do, consulting or otherwise or have a suggestion either for me or for Glenice, why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Tree Selection in Design Elements

July 5th, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Tree Selection

 

This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Perhaps some people are put off trees because they can drop heaps of leaves and sometimes a branch or two, or fall over in storms.

But there’s a reason for that.

"For the trees in a landscape to grow, thrive and survive the test of time, many factors need to be considered when you are choosing the trees for your garden. "

Probably something we already know, and that is trees are an essential part of our landscape and according to the CSIRO, trees will clean air and are the lungs of the planet. 

Let’s find out who to call? 

I'm talking to Arboriculture Consultant and Landscape Designer, Glenice Davies.

When choosing trees you need to consider what you want out of a tree?

  •  evergreen or deciduous?
  • shape and habit
  • how big will it grow?
  • size of the roots.
  • flowering and/or fruiting?
  • life span
  • what maintenance is involved?

Research shows that people experience more deaths from heart disease and respiratory diseases in urban areas where the tree had been removed than from those urban areas where trees were still allowed to grow.

Still want to get rid of those trees?

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Cloud pruned trees, England. photo M. Cannon

 

If you have any questions about tree selection or have a suggestion why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener What Does An Arborist Really Do?

June 28th, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

ManagingTrees: Role of Arborist. Part 1

Trees have a valuable role to play in our immediate environment and also to our native wildlife.

A lot of gardeners really care for their trees when it comes to fertilizing and maintenance but when it comes to tree maintenance such as pruning, it’s not that straight forward.

So you have a tree that needs lopping or even a tree that you want cut down.

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photo M Cannon

Who should you call?

Not Jo the lawnmower man or No Name Garden Maintenance.

You need to call a professional, but there is a distinct difference between these tree professionals and you need to know what they are?

This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Let’s find out who to call?

I'm talking with Glenice Davie, landscape designer.

 

People either love or hate trees, but trees have so many positive benefits.

Tree will clear air-they’re the lungs of the planet.

If you have any questions about tree maintenance or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Choosing A Focal Point in Design Elements

June 21st, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Choosing a Focal Point

Today RWG’s garden designer Peter Nixon is taking a look at focal points in the garden.

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Natal Flame Bush

At this time of year, when trees are looking bare, and perhaps there’s not much to look at in the garden, it’s a good time to assess what you have and what you could improve.

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Plumeria Pudica

 

Focal points are some plant, whether it’s a tree or a shrub a water feature or a statue, that draws the eye and gives the garden some sense of design. 

How do you know what to choose, especially these days when we have smaller gardens?

I'm talking with Peter Nixon, Director of Paradisus Garden Design.

 

The small trees mentioned were Plumeria pudica-the evergreen Frangipani, Synadenium grantii rubra or red south African mild bush; Alberta magna-the Natal Flame Bush for cool temperate to warm temperate regions or don’t go past the double flowering Crabapple-Malus ionensis plena. 

 

If you have any questions about growing small trees for focal points or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Pittosporum Tasman Ruffles in Plant of the Week

June 14th, 2018

PLANT OF THE WEEK

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Pittosporum " Tasman Ruffles"

Pittosporum tenuifolium "Tasman Ruffles."

 

Are you interested in a screening hedge that can grow to a metre a year?

This next plant has varieties that have delicate lacey leaves that are contrasted by that very dark coloured bark. 

 

The genus comes in a variety of shapes and sizes from quite small and almost self hedging to the larger screening shrubs.

I'm talking with Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

Let’s find out more about them

 

Originating in New Zealand, these plants are pretty hardy and even second line salt tolerant.

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Pittosporum Golf Ball 

Jeremy also grows Pittosporum Golf Ball, which grows into the size of a basketball.

This pittosporum is ideal because it's practically self shaping with the internodes being much closer than you would expect to see on a pittosporum.

 

Pittosporums are generally tough plants but there is one exception though.

If you’re trying to grow a pittosporum on the shady south side of a fence in just half a metre of soil next to a pool, be prepared to be disappointed.

The bottom half will lose its leaves and you’ll eventually see them die off one by one.

This is the experience of a neighbouring garden which is little more than pool, these poor pittosporums and a patch of lawn.

If you have a question either for me or the plant panel why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 
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Real World Gardener Gardens Fit For a Magazine

June 14th, 2018

PLANT DOCTOR

Steve's Garden On Show

Have you ever wondered how gardens are chosen to feature in gardening magazines?

Well, it all starts with a photo.

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Steve's Garden photo Brent Wilson

Perhaps you’ve sent in a photo of your garden to a magazine editor hoping that they would think it worthy enough to come around and photograph?

If you haven’t, and you have such a garden, then it may just be timely to start taking photos, then choosing some of the best ones to send in.

RWG contributor from the Plant Doctor segment did just that.

Let’s find out how it came about.

I'm talking withSteve Falcioni General Manager of www.ecoogranicgarden.com.au

PLAY: Steves Garden_ 6th June 2018

 

Steve has a rooftop garden in the inner city of a major city, so it’s subject to many plant unfriendly conditions like strong winds, blazing sun or cold hard shade.

Over time time with the correct plant choices, and possibly some bad ways along the way that got turfed, Steve managed to create a suburban oasis.

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Steve Falcioni’s rooftop garden shows he’s mastered the art of gardening on concrete (Photo credit – Brent Wilson for ABC Gardening Australia magazine)

Steve mentioned Aptinia cordifolia, Ficus pumila. Tracheospermum asiaticum, as ground covers to protect the potted plants behind. 

When asked if Steve ever grew Dichondra repens " Silver Falls," he said that because it went " off" ( looked tatty) during the winter months, it wasn't appealing enough to keep.

There are also indoor plants featured in this garden in a light filled apartment.

If you have any questions either for me or Steve, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
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Real World Gardener Who Was William Guillfoyle?

June 7th, 2018

GARDEN HISTORY

William Guilfoyle

How’s your garden history knowledge?

You may have heard of Gertrude Jekyll, an Australian Garden Designer of some note, but have you heard of William Guillfoyle?

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Melbourne Botanic Gardens' Volcano planting photo : Stuart Read

 

Possibly not, but this next segment is about to change all that.

Why are we talking about William Guillfoyle?

Because first and foremost, he had a lot to do with making Melbourne Botanic gardens the beautiful space it is today.

Let’s find out some history

I'm talking withStuart Read committee member of the Australian Garden History Society.

 

William Guillfoyle was not a botanist, but a horticulturalist, so had a different view of how a botanic garden should be presented to the public.

He came from a family of nurserymen/women and first worked in his parents' famous " Exotic" nursery in Double Bay.

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Melbourne Botanic gardens volcano planting photo : Stuart Read

The Exotic nursery was one of the major nurseries in Sydney from the 1840's and imported thousands of Fuchsias, conifers, and ferns

. Plus it also had collections of Australian plants grown from seed collected on expeditions.

Guillfoyle was Director of Melbourne Botanic Gardens from 1873 - 1910

Plus, William was responsible for making available all those Jacaranda seedlings which now make Sydney and many regional centres so popular with Jacaranda tours in November.

 

If you have any questions either for me or Sotuart, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Useful and Beautiful Fence Concealers in Design Elements

May 31st, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Plants to hide that fence

Are you the sort of gardening that doesn’t think too much about the look of the fence?

Perhaps you’ve had the fence so long that you’ve gotten used to the idea of looking at it without realizing that it’s really an eyesore.

Starr_081230-0655_Montanoa_hibiscifolia.

Montanoa hibiscifolia: Mexican Tree Daisy

It’s really important to conceal the fence for a few reasons.

You may remember that last week I said, no-one is saying “ my garden looks too big.”

Plus it’s not all about climbers, climbers climbers, to hide the fence.

Let’s find out. 

That was Peter Nixon Garden Designer and Director of Paradisus Garden Design.

 

Hiding the fence will make the garden look bigger.

So, Peter mentioned

Viburnum odoratissimum “Dense Fence” or Viburnum odoratissimum “ Quick Fence.” if you’re wanting a free standing shrub.

Mexican Tree Daisy or Montanoa hibsicifolia

For Cool Temp districts:

Prunus lusitanica - Portugese Laurel Prunus laurocerasus - Cherry Laurel 

  If you have a question either for me or Peter, why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com

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Real World Gardener Gardening in Tight Spaces part 2

May 31st, 2018

BACKYARD BIODYNAMICS

Gardening in Tight Spaces part 2

Keeping Your Plants Warm.

Last segment was all about how to keep the heat off your pots, but now we’re in the depths of Autumn, soon to be Winter so we want that warmth. 

 

For every avid gardener, we want to use all the spaces we have to grow plants.

But what do we do with the cold to protect out plants especially if your space gets little sun?

Let’s find out. 

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I'm talking with Diane Watkin, Principle founder and member of Bioydnamics Sydney.

 

The same technique of keeping the sun off your pots is used to keep your plants warm.

the main difference is that you want the warmth during the day, so you are mostly reversing what you did in summer to keep the sun off.

Erect some sort of cover for your pots and put this on at night, but take it off during the day so the plant can enjoy the sun's rays.

You may have a glass cloche, but most likely you'll have to rig something up using sticks, twigs, shade-cloth, or other material.

TIP: Using diamotaceous earth, put a handful in a bucket of water, mix it up and then spray onto the soil. The silica in the diamotaceous earth will raise the temperature of the soil by 1-2 degrees, which may just make the difference.

If you have any questions either for me or Diane you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
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Real World Gardener Gardening in Tight Spaces Part 1

May 24th, 2018

BACKYARD BIODYNAMICS

Gardening in Tight Spaces.

More and more gardeners across Australia have downsized and only have only a very small patch of dirt, or just a balcony.

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You might only have a window ledge or a couple of steps but you still want some sort of garden.

Pity that apartments weren’t designed to follow the sun, can you imagine if they did?

You might have a beautiful sunny balcony in warm weather but it's dark, and cold in the cooler months. The reverse is true of course.

So what can the hungry gardener do to grow a few plants on their balcony?

Let’s find out. I'm talking with Diane Watkin, Principle founder and member of Bioydnamics Sydney.

 

 

Balcony%2Bgarden.jpgDiane shifts her pots from one side of the garden to the other every 6 months so she can catch 4-5 hours of sunlight to grow her herbs and veggies in pots.

 

It’s up to you really as to whether or not you choose plastic pots, some garden centres do accept plastic pots, but I’m not sure what they do with them. 

To keep the heat off your terracotta pots, before planting them up, soak them in water for about twenty minutes.

After potting, wrap an old tea towel or piece of hessian that you have wetted.

Spray the outer material every day when it has dried to keep up the moisture.

 

Diane has a particular recipe for filling garden pots, however, this may not be feasible, and too heavy for your particular situation. 

 

Remember, find out the weight bearing load of your balcony before you start filling tip with terracotta pots and garden soil. 

 

If you have any questions either for me or Diane you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
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