Real World Gardener What Does An Arborist Really Do?

July 11th, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

1-Kauri%2BPine.jpgWhat Does an Arborist or Consultant Arborist Do?

 

This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Did you know that there was an Institute of Australian Consulting Arborists?

So what is a consulting arborist and can they cut down your trees if you want them too?

Let’s find out?

 

If you’ve been asked for an Arborist Report, a Tree Report or an Arboricultural Impact Assessment then a consulting arborist is the best person to call because they often prepare these reports for clients with respect to trees for a range of reasons.

And where do you find these consulting arborists? 

Look no further than the Accredited Members of the Institute of Australian Consulting Arboriculturists (IACA) (www.iaca.org.au ) provide written reports for their clients in the public and private sectors. IACA members do not undertake tree pruning or removal work.

The other organization is Arboriculture Australia which also lists consulting arborists.

www.arboriculture.org.au

 

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photo Capel Manor College-Arborist Course.

And where do you find these consulting arborists?

Look no further than the Accredited Members of the Institute of Australian Consulting Arboriculturists (IACA) (www.iaca.org.au ) provide written reports for their clients in the public and private sectors. IACA members do not undertake tree pruning or removal work.

The other organization is Arboriculture Australia which also lists consulting arborists.

www.arboriculture.org.au

 

If you have any questions about what arborists do, consulting or otherwise or have a suggestion either for me or for Glenice, why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Heuchera is Plant of the Week

July 11th, 2018

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Heuchera species.

Gardening isn’t just about the flowers you know.

 

There are plants that have leaves in a kaleidoscope of colours with names like Pink Fizz, Champagne,  Gumdrops, and Forever Purple.

Heuchera is also great for dry shade in places where root competition won't allow most plants to grow.

There’s got to be one that will inspire you to plant into your garden.

Heuchera.jpg

I'm talking with Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au 

Let's find out about them

Heuchera's have a shallow root system and are perfect for greenwalls of any kind.

Jeremy mentioned that Heuchera loves cooler weather and the Autumn/Winter months is the time when the grow most of their Heuchera varieties.

These plants tolerate shady condtions and will cope with being an indoor plant for quite a few months.

Darker leafed varieties can cope with full sun, but it's best to try them on in a sunny location first before planting them into the ground.

In colder climates, to protect them from frost damage, lay a 2 cm layer of thick straw mulch around the plants. 

Heuchera's have a shallow root system and are also perfect for greenwalls of any kind.

If you have a question either for me or the plant panel why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 
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Real World Gardener Winter Care of Ornamental Plants in Plant Doctor

July 11th, 2018

PLANT DOCTOR

Winter Care of Ornamental Plants

Ornamental plants are those whose leaves, flowers and fruits we don't eat.

Autumn is meant to gently acclimatise most plants to the cold.

What if Autumn is just an extension of Summer and then, whoosh, cold weather arrives all too soon and it's winter?

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Snow damage on Eucalypts

That is one reason that during winter some of our trees and shrubs don’t look so healthy and gardeners start getting concerned that something is wrong with their particular plant.

Unsuspecting gardeners might even think that their plant is dying because the leaves have started dropping of, yet it’s supposed to be evergreen.

Could it be just a response to cold weather or is something untoward happening in the soil that is affecting the plant’s health?

Let’s find out.. 

I'm talking with was Steve Falcioni, General Manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

The leaves can change colour due to the cold, and it may be just a normal reaction or because the plant can't access nutrients that it needs.

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Frost Damagon Avocado. photo Dept of  Primary Industries W. A.

If you make a note in your garden diary that a particular plant did this or that in winter, you may discover that it’s quite normal during the cold months of the year. 

Seaweed extracts help plants reduce stress factors and one of them is coping with the cold.

Applying it regularly though is a must for this to be of benefit.

If you have any questions either for me or Steve, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
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Real World Gardener Tree Selection in Design Elements

July 5th, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Tree Selection

 

This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Perhaps some people are put off trees because they can drop heaps of leaves and sometimes a branch or two, or fall over in storms.

But there’s a reason for that.

"For the trees in a landscape to grow, thrive and survive the test of time, many factors need to be considered when you are choosing the trees for your garden. "

Probably something we already know, and that is trees are an essential part of our landscape and according to the CSIRO, trees will clean air and are the lungs of the planet. 

Let’s find out who to call? 

I'm talking to Arboriculture Consultant and Landscape Designer, Glenice Davies.

When choosing trees you need to consider what you want out of a tree?

  •  evergreen or deciduous?
  • shape and habit
  • how big will it grow?
  • size of the roots.
  • flowering and/or fruiting?
  • life span
  • what maintenance is involved?

Research shows that people experience more deaths from heart disease and respiratory diseases in urban areas where the tree had been removed than from those urban areas where trees were still allowed to grow.

Still want to get rid of those trees?

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Cloud pruned trees, England. photo M. Cannon

 

If you have any questions about tree selection or have a suggestion why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Native Lasiandra in Plant of the Week

July 5th, 2018

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Melastoma affine: Native Lasiandra: Blue Tongue

 

If you’re into your gardening and love the colour purple for flowers and perhaps fruits or foliage, then this little gem might surprise you.

melastoma-affine1.jpg

The reason is that it’s native to Australia but looks just like it’s exotic cousin from South America.

Let’s find out about it.

 

 

I'm talking with Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

 

Because this plant is indigenous to Australia, there are pollinators that can visit this plant successfully, unlike the Tibouchina which it resembles.

Here's how they do it.

Funnily enough, Melastoma produces no nectar - giving pollinators large amounts of pollen instead, which must be extracted through pores on the anthers.

The flowers are pollinated in the wild by carpenter bees - the Giant Carpenter Bee and the Metallic Green Carpenter Bee - they grab hold of the stamen (the bit that holds the pollen) and give it a good shake.

Introduced Honey Bees can't 'buzz pollinate' - they don't have the ability or technique to vibrate their wings while clasping the stamen.

So, they can only gather pollen if it has been already released onto the petals.

 

That’s why you’ll never see fruits on a Tibouchina but will, on a Native Lasiandra. 
Worth getting for that reason alone.

If you have a question either for me or the plant panel why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener English Garden Designers in Garden History

July 5th, 2018

GARDEN HISTORY

English Landscapes and How They Changed Australian Gardens.

 

Why did the first settlers try and emulate the English garden in such different conditions is easy enough to answer?

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Stowe, England photo M. Cannon

They wanted a home away from home, much like peoples from other nations choosing to have quite different gardens.

In Today’s garden history segment we look at those first English influences and why they’re still relevant today.

I'm talking with Stuart Read, committee member of the National Garden History Society of Australia., which you can join or attend one of their meetings by the way.

David Jaques has written a book on English landscapes that Stuart recommends.

When Australia was being settled the "beautiful" or English "landscape" style was dominating garden design as it had started to do from the 1700's.

This was basically faked up landscapes that were intended to look like the real thing.

Funnily enough, 220 years later, they do look like the r"real thing," because the trees have grown into what the landscaper had intended.

Landscapers like Capability Brown started this revolution in garden design as seen in the photographs of Stowe, where he first started the trend.

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Stowe, England, photo M Cannon

The most famous landscapers of that time were Capability Brown, along with Charles Bridgeman, William Kent, and later Humphrey Repton.

If you have any questions either for me or Stuart, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener What Does An Arborist Really Do?

June 28th, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

ManagingTrees: Role of Arborist. Part 1

Trees have a valuable role to play in our immediate environment and also to our native wildlife.

A lot of gardeners really care for their trees when it comes to fertilizing and maintenance but when it comes to tree maintenance such as pruning, it’s not that straight forward.

So you have a tree that needs lopping or even a tree that you want cut down.

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photo M Cannon

Who should you call?

Not Jo the lawnmower man or No Name Garden Maintenance.

You need to call a professional, but there is a distinct difference between these tree professionals and you need to know what they are?

This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Let’s find out who to call?

I'm talking with Glenice Davie, landscape designer.

 

People either love or hate trees, but trees have so many positive benefits.

Tree will clear air-they’re the lungs of the planet.

If you have any questions about tree maintenance or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Favourite Camellias in Plant of the Week

June 28th, 2018

SEGMENT FOR TODAY

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Camellia japonica 

 

Camellias originate in China and Japan and if you’ve never grown one, it’s time to start looking at those flowering in people’s gardens and in nursery and garden centres to choose one of your favourites.

Soon you will have a long list of favourites and find it difficult to narrow it down to just one or two.

I asked the plant panel this question, and let’s see what they came up with.

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Camellia japonica Lovelight

I'm talking with Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

 

 Favourites mentioned are : Easter Morn; Lovelight, Mrs D. W. Descanso, Betty Cuthbert, Bob Hope.

 

Camellia%2Bvarieties.jpg

 

 Camellias prefer acidic soil so if you like to grow Azaleas and they’re successful in your garden, why not add a backdrop of Camellias or two. 

If you’re short on space, Camellias make good subjects for espalier too.

If you have a question either for me or the plant panel why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener Winter Care of Citrus in Plant Doctor

June 28th, 2018

PLANT DOCTOR

Citrus Winter Care

Are you wondering “what’s wrong with my citrus tree?” right now.

Perhaps the symptoms that you’re seeing now seem to happen every winter?

If that’s the case, then you’ll need to listen in closely to this next segment which is just about that.

Let’s find out.. I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, general manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

 

Steve offered quite a range of things to do for your citrus tree.

Firstly though, you need to assess your tree to determine what’s going on with it.

The number 1 problem to look out for is scale.

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Citrus scale ( white louse scale) will cover the stems, twigs and branches of your citrus tree in what looks like fine shredded coconut that has tuck fast.

To treat this problem spray with Eco Oil making sure all surfaces are covered well.

Spray again a week later as a follow up spray.

If it looks like nothing's happened try flicking off the scale with your finger. Live scale easily flicks off, whereas dead scale sticks fast.

If the scale problem is so bad that the oil spray doesn't seem to be working, then go for a lime-sulphur spray. Winter is the only time for this one on citrus.

Some districts that have warmer weather all year round need to hang a pheremone trap to control citrus leaf miner. 

The moth lays its eggs into the leaf where the larvae feed and finally tunnel out created leaf distortion and silvering.

One things for sure, and that is there’s no point in spreading granular citrus tree fertiliser around the tree in winter.

There is next to no if any, uptake of nutrients from the fertiliser because the tree isn’t in active growth, (unless you’re in subtropical areas) and the fertiliser won’t break down to release the nutrients because of the lack of microbial activity in the soil during winter.

 

If you have any questions either for me or Steve, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 
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Real World Gardener Choosing A Focal Point in Design Elements

June 21st, 2018

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Choosing a Focal Point

Today RWG’s garden designer Peter Nixon is taking a look at focal points in the garden.

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Natal Flame Bush

At this time of year, when trees are looking bare, and perhaps there’s not much to look at in the garden, it’s a good time to assess what you have and what you could improve.

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Plumeria Pudica

 

Focal points are some plant, whether it’s a tree or a shrub a water feature or a statue, that draws the eye and gives the garden some sense of design. 

How do you know what to choose, especially these days when we have smaller gardens?

I'm talking with Peter Nixon, Director of Paradisus Garden Design.

 

The small trees mentioned were Plumeria pudica-the evergreen Frangipani, Synadenium grantii rubra or red south African mild bush; Alberta magna-the Natal Flame Bush for cool temperate to warm temperate regions or don’t go past the double flowering Crabapple-Malus ionensis plena. 

 

If you have any questions about growing small trees for focal points or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

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