Real World Gardener NEW SERIES Mass Planting for Large and Small Gardens in Design Elements

August 17th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Mass Planting Series

Mass planting for large and small gardens part 1

Would you think that mass planting a garden would be something easy to do?

On the surface it sounds easy; just pick a couple of types of plants that you like and away you go, would that be right?

1-1-SCA_2360_2060.JPG

Mass planting for large gardens: Scampston, England photo M Cannon

The answer is no, because visually you might end up with such a boring garden as to be exasperating.

Have you heard the rule “ the greater amount of texture you use the louder your garden reads visually?”

Let’s find out about this wonderful rule.

 

PLAY: Mass Planting_large gardens_9th August 2017

 

That was Peter Nixon, Director of www.peternixon.com.au

Mass%2Bplanting-Paul%2BUrquhart.jpgIf you have a large expanse of garden with all the same colour green , the same leaf shape and the same texture, the garden will be homogenous and even boring.

 

You'll be asking "Where's my beautiful garden?"

 

Find plants that you like but try and like ones with different leaf shapes, colours and textures when you’re doing planting on a biggish scale.

 

Peter suggests as an example of texture and leaf contrast, Poa Eskdale with Opuntia Burbank Spineless.

 

If you want mass planting to hide the fence, try

Viburnum odoratissium "Dense Fence," or Quick Fence.

 

As Peter says, even if it’s a small garden, don’t put lots of little plants in, but less plants that are bigger works better.

 
00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Little Egret is Wildlife in Focus

June 16th, 2017

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Little Egret

Egretta garzetta

Australia has plenty of water birds but do you think of our waterbirds as hanging around the seashore?

That’s probably true of a lot of water birds but others prefer inland areas where there’s plenty of water as in creeks, rivers and lakes.

 

 

Little_Egret_%2528Egretta_garzetta%2529-

Egretta garzetta

In fact some water birds like open areas with shallow fresh water while others go for coastal swamps, shallow seasonal meadows and marshes, stony rise lowlands and large saline lakes.

There's more than one Egret that lives in Australia, so how to tell which it is that you're looking at.

they look similar so it is quite confusing.

Which one is white with black legs?

 

Let’s find out more.. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of Birds in Backyards.

 

 

All Egrets tend to be white with long legs and a long beak.

The distinguishing features is that the Little Egret has a black bill with dark grey-black legs.

Both the Cattle Egret and the Little Egret get flumes on the back of their head when they're breeding.

The colour of the Cattle Egret's plumes are orangey-yellow, but the Little Egret's plumes are white.

Little_Egret.jpg

Breeding plume of Little Egret

It's so important to retain Australia's wetlands.

Wetlands support a rich diversity of plants and animals including a large number of waterbirds that depend on them for food, shelter and breeding.

The Little Egret hunts for fish and other small water creatures in shallow water and may be found in the company of other wading birds, but rarely with others of its own species.

If you have any questions about the little egret, or have some information to share, drop us a line to or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener amazing Olive Backed Oriole is Wildlife in Focus

April 24th, 2017

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Olive Backed Oriole Oriolus sagittatus

 

What would you pick for the top songbird in Australia or perhaps just in your district?

Perhaps the Magpie, or Butcher bird, or for those who are a bit more savvy with bird identification and bird calls, would you pick the Figbird? Australia does make the top 40 songbirds in the world, but would you have picked this next one?

 

Oriolus_sagittatus_-Canberra%252C_Austra

Olive Backed Oriole (Oriolus saggitatus) Picture of the Olive-backed Oriole has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.

 

Olive Backed Oriole (Oriolus saggitatus) Picture of the Olive-backed Oriole has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.

 

Did you know that not only does the Oriole like to live in woodlands and rainforests, but leafy urban areas that plenty of trees.

You may have heard the call and not realised what bird it the call belonged to.

 

Let’s find out.  I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of Birds in Backyards.

As Holly mention, the Oriole is found along coastal and near inland strips in northern and eastern Australia from Broome WA, to the south-east of South Australia; plus around Adelaide.

 

These birds are really good at hiding themselves especially the fact that they can throw their calls and mimic other birds such as magpies.

 

All in all, making it a challenge to find them, but surprisingly they can be found in urban areas that are leafy and green.

 

Listen out for the "orry-orry-oriole" call, which is their genuine call.

 

If you have any questions about the Olive Backed Oriole or have some photos to share, why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Red Backed Fairy Wren is Wildlife in Focus

March 16th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Red Backed Fairy Wren and Superb Fairy Wren

 

This little bird is the smallest of the wren species in Australia.

In fact it’s smaller than a sparrow and because it’s so small, that it’s called the Elfin wren.

Red%2BBacked%2BFairy%2BWren.jpg
Red Backed Fairy Wren

The males of course have all the colour being a glossy black with a scarlet patch, whilst the females are brown.

They can't be mistaken for a sparrow because they're smaller and have that characteristic pointing up tail, bouncing around like little ping pong balls.

 Let’s find out what’s great about this bird.

 

Smaller and shyer than the Superb Fairy Wren , the Red Backed Fairy Wren has a similar call.

Female_Red-backed_Fairywren.JPG
Female Red Backed Fairy Wren, not red at all.

But most of us won’t see this Fairy Wren because Red-backed Fairy-wrens are essentially birds of Australia's north where they are mainly restricted to the more humid zones closer to the coast.

In eastern Australia they do extend south down the NSW north coast to near Newcastle and in W.A. south to Cape Keraudren, again along the coast.

Apparently they’re common around the outskirts of Brisbane and Darwin.

If you have any questions about Red Back Fairy Wrens, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 VEGETABLE HEROES

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Beautiful Brown Gerygone in Wildlife in Focus

December 2nd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER

Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Brown GerygoneBrown-Gerygone-John-Gunning.jpg

Belonging to the family of Scrubwrens means this tiny bird is very hard to identify if you see it flitting about in the bush. 

In fact if you were on a guided walk you might be told that they belong to the group SBB or small brown birds. 

Did you know though that this particular bird builds a truly unusual nest and you can recognise the call if you think of a little phrase, "which is it?"

Let’s find out what it is.. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons Manager of www.birdsinbackyards

PLAY: Brown Gerygone_23rd November 2016 

 

Gerygone is pronounced Jerr-Ig-O-Knee  

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Welcome Swallow in Wildlife in Focus

November 3rd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

The Welcome Swallow is a native bird that makes a mixture of twittering and soft warbling notes.

The Welcome Swallow belongs to the family of Passerines which are Australia's songbirds.

Easily spotted flying low around sport’s fields and open grassy areas, it’s probably one you seen but probably not seen it still for long enough to make out its markings.

What is this bird?

Let’s find out .I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of www.birdsinbackyards.com.au

Welcome swallows belong to a group of songbirds and do have a lovely call if you ever hear them when they’re still.

They are mainly metallic blue black with a light grey chest but their characteristic feature is the lovely long forked tail, sometimes with spots.

Welcome_Swallow_Wings.jpg

They're on the wing the majority of the time catching their prey which is mainly insects.

They make mud nests on the sides of houses and buildings which can be a nuisance, however, they're only a short time in the nest, 2 - 3 weeks, so it's not that much of an inconvenience.

Remember that they are native and therefore a protected species.

Wait until the young swallows have fledged before removing the nest if it's in an awkward location.

The welcome swallow is found in most places of Australia and it’s only in Tasmania that they migrate across the Bass Strait for the winter.

Although there has been reports of young fledglings staying put in Tasmania for their first winter.

You can catch up that segment by listening to the podcast www.realworldgardener.com

If you have any questions about welcome swallows or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Wedge Tailed Eagle is Wildlife in Focus

September 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

wedge%2Btailed%2Beagle.jpgWith a wingspan of up to 2.5m, and standing at least one metre tall, the Wedge-Tailed Eagle is the largest raptor in Australia.

A lanky bird, it hunts by flying up to 2 kilometres high, circling on thermal air currents for as long as 90 minutes and sailing out over the countryside, covering wide areas .

When flying, the wings have distinctive flight tips and its tail fanned and wedge shaped.

Let’s find more. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of www.birdsinbackyards.com.au

Tthe Wedge-Tailed Eagle is found throughout Australia, including Tasmania and will aggressively defend their territory, even against drones.

Aquila_audax_-_Captain%2527s_Flat.jpg

Wedge Tailed Eagle

Earlier this century, when eagles were found on dead sheep and lambs, it was thought that they had killed them.

Bounties were paid to farmers for shooting them, (In one year in Queensland 10000 bounties were paid and between 1927-1968 in Western Australia another 150000.)

All that has stopped once people realized that the eagles usually attack only poor, dying or dead lambs and have little effect on the sheep industry. Today they are protected in all states.

If you have any questions about Wedge Tailed Eagles or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Striated Heron in Wildlife in Focus

August 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IF FOCUS

Striated Heron

The Striated Heron is doesn't get as much attention as other Australian herons because of its quiet nature.

butorides_striata_-_laem_pak_bia.jpg
Butorides striata; Striated Heron

 

With its short legs, black crown with striations or  stripes on its throat and neck that can either be grey or rufous in colour; it lives quietly among the mangrove forests, mudflats and oyster-beds of eastern, northern and north-western Australia, where it creeps about in the soft mud among the mangrove roots in search of prey such as fish, crabs and other marine invertebrates.

Let’s find out about it. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, manager of Birds in Backyards. www.birdsinbackyards.org.au

striated%2BHeron.png

These birds are a touch smaller than the white faced heron, and about the same size as Dusky Moorhens.

When foraging, these herons usually adopt a hunched posture, with the head and neck drawn back into the bird’s body, while keeping the bill held horizontally, parallel to the surface of the mud.

It may be small with short legs but it’s pretty good at stalking it’s food.

Slowly, either standing and waiting for prey to emerge or by sometimes plunging at it from a perch, before stabbing it with its sharp bill.

If you have any questions about Striated Herons or any other bird or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Working in Namibia is Living Planet

August 7th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

LIVING PLANET

What happens when an ecologist from Australia, packs up and leaves to work in Namibia for a couple of years?

Eric%2BForlee%2Btigers%2Bin%2BNamibia.jp

Namibia wildlife

Some of the wildlife found in Namibia are big cats, Cheetahs, Elephants, Zebras, and Giraffes.

Let’s find out.. I'm talking with Katie Oxenham, a Consulting ecologist who now lives in Sydney.

Katie's role in Namibia was conservancy and natural management support. She was employed by the Namibia Nature Foundation and worked with communities in the north of the country to manage natural resources such as the harvest of Devil's Claw. Devil's Claw is different to the Australian weed by the same name found in the Top End.

devil%2527s%2Bclaw%2Btuber.jpg

Devils-Claw-flower-H-850x480.jpg

 

Help with how to sustainably harvest the Devil's Claw was important because it prevented the plant from becoming regionally extinct.

Katie also helped the indigenous population with entering into contracts with private companies of eco-tourist lodges whereby they would acquire jobs thus giving them a reason to conserve wildlife.

Namibia has unique landscapes and is home to a vast diversity of wildlife found nowhere else on Earth.

There are approximately 4,000 plant species, over 650 bird species and 80 large mammal species.Namibia is a pretty special place and a must see destination for tourists wanting to see African wildlife.

If you have any questions about Namibia or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Chestnut Crowned Babbler in Wildlife in Focus

July 15th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Chestnut Crowned Babbler - An Australian Bird

Did you know that Australian birds are being studied by scientists overseas and the bird on today’s show has been found to be able communicate in a similar way to how humans use language?

chestnut%2Bcrowned%2Bbabbler_g%2BChapman
Chestnut Crowned Babbler, photo Graeme Chapman

Chestnut Crowned Babblers have a distinct white stripe over their eye.

They also have a curved beak a bit like a honey eater which they use to search for food by probing amongst leaf litter and twigs on the ground. These Babblers are a bit bigger than your average Pee Wee to give you some gauge as to their size.  

So let’s find out I'm talking with  Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of Birds in Backyards. 

Babbler birds were found to combine two sounds (let’s call them sound A and sound B) to generate calls associated with specific behaviours.

In flight, they used an "A-B" call to make their whereabouts known, but when alerting chicks to food they combined the sounds differently to make "B-A-B".

The birds seemed to understand the meaning of the calls.

chestnut%2Bcrowned%2Bbabbler_trinity%2Bn
Chestnut Crowned Babbler photo Trinity News Daily

When the feeding call was played back to them, they looked at nests, while when they heard a flight call they looked at the sky.

How interesting is that?

If you have any questions about Chestnut crowned babblers or have a photo to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

- Older Posts »