Real World Gardener Gardening After Heavy Rain

March 30th, 2017

`REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

THE GOOD EARTH

GARDENING AFTER HEAVY RAIN.

If your district was lucky enough to have lots of rain over the last few weeks, that I hope your garden is exploding in colour and lush green growth.

My district has been deluged with rain with accompanying high humidity, so gardening isn't all that pleasant still.

Of course after all that rain, along with the longer days of the season, means the weeds will start sprouting with a vengeance

So what are some tips to watch out for if you plan to go gardening after heavy rain.

Let’s find out about this plant.Kifsgate_web.jpg

I'm talking with Margaret Mossakowska of www.mosshouse.com.au

Play: Gardening After Heavy Rain_22nd March 2017

Luckily, rain softens the soil, making weeding much easier on the hands and back. Tackle them now while they're seedlings to prevent them from taking over your garden.

Then spread some mulch.

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Real World Gardener Part 2 of Autumn Gardening in Design Elements

March 30th, 2017

1-BOD_1521.jpg`REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

NEW SERIES ON AUTUMN GARDENING

Autumn Planting

I’m sure you’ve heard before that Autumn is one of the best times to get planting especially for native plants.

The reason is the roots will be able to put on some real growth before the winter months, and will be ready to get growing once Spring hits.

 

Let’s find out what preparation you need to do.

I'm talking with Glenice Buck consulting arborist and landscape designer from www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

PLAY: Getting Your Garden Ready for Autumn Part 3_29th March 2017

 

If you’ve already got some plants that are thriving in your garden, and you have spaces to fill, a good idea is to choose plants that are similar, or from the same family but perhaps with a different flower or foliage colour.

Yes the soil temperature is still warm enough to get good results with new plants and also get the plants in the ground and settled before the following summer months.

What are some tips for planting out new beds?

You need to remove all weeds and or grass from the area to be planted out – then you need to dig over the soil and see what the condition of the soil is – do you need to add more organic matter etc.

 

Glenice says "I always look at what plants I have growing in other areas of the garden – to see what I can lift an divide or if there is a plant not doing so well – if it would do better in the new bed. 

For species selection I also look at what has really thrived in the garden and try and pick either more of the same species – could be in a different colour or even something which is related to that plant."

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Real World Gardener NEW Garden History an Introduction

March 30th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. WHAT IS GARDEN HISTORY ALL ABOUT?

Introduction to the Garden History Society

Many people might consider that Australia is too young a country to have historic gardens.

I daresay that's true when compared with England where there are beautiful gardens as featured in this photo, which I took when visiting a few years ago.

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photo M Cannon

However,, there is a Historic House Trust in Australia, and with them there are historic gardens.

Some of them have fallen to neglect and some have been restored or are in the process of being restored by members of the "Garden History Society."

So it would seem that there are indeed many historic houses in Australia, and there are plenty of early 20th century houses which would look so much nicer with a complimentary garden.

There are also hidden gems in our country which aren’t normally open to the public, so how can we see them.

Let’s find out what the "Garden History Society" is and how we can see hidden gems..

I'm talking with Stuart Read, Landscape Historian and member of the national management committee of the www.gardenhistorysociety.org.au

There are branches around Australia of the Australian Garden History Society, but you don’t have to be a member to go along to one of their talks, activities or events.

If you have any questions about the History of Australian gardens, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener 28th January Citrus Gall Wasp in Plant Doctor

March 24th, 2017

PLANT DOCTOR

Pests of Citrus-Citrus Gall Wasp

If you though that all you had to contend with on Citrus, was the curling, silvery leaves, the Bronze-Orange stink bugs, the citrus scale on the trunk, then think again, because there's at least one more.

citrus%2Bgall%2Bwasp-dept%2Bof%2Bag%2Bwa

Citrus Gall Wasp-image Dept. of Ag. W.A.

This is a native pest of all citrus, which does include native citrus trees like finger limes, and now is the time when you can notice the damage that this pest has done to your tree. As in a other citrus pests, the damage is done by a tiny moth, about 2-3mm that usually comes out late in the evening and then promptly dies after a very short time.

The damage starts of green and then over time, turns to a grey-brown coloured lump.

The lifecyle of the wasp larvae is quite long, from when the wasp stings the branch and lays its eggs to when the wasp emerges, is about one year.

Initially, you may not notice the bumps, but from Autumn onwards, they are becoming much more noticeable on the citrus trees.

 

Let’s find out what can be done about this problem

I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, General Manager ofwww.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

citrus%2Bgall%2Bwasp%2Bdamage.jpg

Citrus Gall Wasp damage-image Dept. of Ag. W.A.

 

 

We certainly imported a few citrus pasts in the short time that white Australians have been here, but this pest is a native that mainly only attacked finger limes.

Originally only being found in Queensland and northern NSW, but with all the movement of plants from state to state, this pest can now be found as far south as Melbourne.

If you have any questions about Citrus Gall wasps, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Autumn Gardening Part 1 in Design Elements

March 24th, 2017

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Autumn Gardening Series Part 1

 

Autumn gardening –is a favourite time for many gardeners around Australia because it’s a much milder time of year compared with the heat of Summer.

In some districts the leaves on deciduous trees are starting to change colours to Autumn buttery yellow tones, or flame red, other plants are putting on a new flush of growth and budding up for the last hurrah before the cold sets in.

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Bodnant Garden, England photo M Cannon

 

During Summer, many of us stayed indoors under the fan or in the air-conditioning while the plants in the garden sweltered.

So, if you haven’t already gone out to assess your plants, you need to act soon

Let’s find out why. I'm talking with Glenice Buck consulting arborist and landscape designer from www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

Even though some of your plants were being attacked by various pests and diseases, the heat of Summer has meant it’s been too hot to spray with anything because of the risk of burning the leaves.

Also,Summer rains in some districts would’ve meant that the sprays would’ve been washed off anyway.

So over the next few months, seize the opportunity to follow Glenice’s autumn gardening plan.

Glenice says 

" I firstly weed out all beds then I look at what shrubs and perennials need cutting back or deadheading.  Sometime shrubs have grown out of shape or spread out too far across or over other plants prune these plants back into their own shape.  Give everything their own space.  If there are plants not looking healthy try and investigate reason why – it may have a pest or disease it may have dried out through summer."

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Real World Gardener Australian Native Holly is Plant of the Week

March 24th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Native Holly

Alcornea ilicifolia

 

The holiday season is over but in case you thought you can improve on next year’s celebrations, what about planting something that is reminiscent of this time of year and it’s a native.

Not only that it good for little native birds because of it’s dense foliage.

Let’s find out about this plant. The plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

I'm talkingwith the Plant Panel : Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Native%2BHolly.jpg

 

This plant would discourage intruders if you planted it under your bedroom window or along the front fence line.

Remembering of course that there are 17 plants called native holly in Australia so do ask for Alcornea ilicifolia.

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Real World Gardener NEW Everlasting Daisies

March 16th, 2017

PLANT OF THE WEEK

NEW Everlasting Daisies.

Bracteantha bracteata

Have you ever been to see the wildflowers in Western Australia?
It’s on my bucket list.
In the wild, these fast-growing annuals perform brilliantly under extreme conditions. They germinate with the first rains in winter and by late August are in full flower, adding bright colour to the otherwise harsh landscape of outback Australia.
But it’s one particular wildflower that we’re focussing on toda

Let’s find out about this plant.
I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

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Everlasting Daisies at Wittunga Botanic Garden, Adelaide. photo M Cannon

Everlasting Daisies at Wittunga Botanic Garden, Adelaide. photo M Cannon

Here’s a tip to keep those everlastings for longer in the vase.

The trick is to pick the flowers when they are young and just opening.  

Then hang upside down in a cool, dark room.

Once dried, the stems can be trimmed and they can be placed in vases or you can replace the stems with florists wire.

If you pick the flowers when they are fully open the petals will fold back towards the stem and the flowers will fall apart.

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Real World Gardener Preserving Summer Fruits

March 16th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

THE GOOD EARTH

Preserving Summer Fruits

Do you have fruit trees in your garden?

Citrus are fruits so you probably answered yes to that.

So what do you do when the fruits all come ripe at once?

Jams and preserves and possibly pickles are the first things that come to mind for most people, but there are a lot more methods of preserving fruit to use later on in the year. Let’s find out about this preserving business.

I'm talking with Margaret Mossakowska from www.mosshouse.com.au 

preserving%2Bsummer%2Bfruit%2Bcitrus.jpg

I hope that’s inspired you to try several different methods of preserving your fruit.

We didn’t even cover making pasta sauce with all those tomatoes that you’re growing right now.

If you have any questions about preserving summer produce or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com

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Real World Gardener Red Backed Fairy Wren is Wildlife in Focus

March 16th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Red Backed Fairy Wren and Superb Fairy Wren

 

This little bird is the smallest of the wren species in Australia.

In fact it’s smaller than a sparrow and because it’s so small, that it’s called the Elfin wren.

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Red Backed Fairy Wren

The males of course have all the colour being a glossy black with a scarlet patch, whilst the females are brown.

They can't be mistaken for a sparrow because they're smaller and have that characteristic pointing up tail, bouncing around like little ping pong balls.

 Let’s find out what’s great about this bird.

 

Smaller and shyer than the Superb Fairy Wren , the Red Backed Fairy Wren has a similar call.

Female_Red-backed_Fairywren.JPG
Female Red Backed Fairy Wren, not red at all.

But most of us won’t see this Fairy Wren because Red-backed Fairy-wrens are essentially birds of Australia's north where they are mainly restricted to the more humid zones closer to the coast.

In eastern Australia they do extend south down the NSW north coast to near Newcastle and in W.A. south to Cape Keraudren, again along the coast.

Apparently they’re common around the outskirts of Brisbane and Darwin.

If you have any questions about Red Back Fairy Wrens, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 VEGETABLE HEROES

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Real World Gardener What Is Wrong with My Worm Farm?

March 9th, 2017

LIVING PLANET

What Went Wrong with My Worm Farm?

 

So you’ve now got a worm farm but you open the lid one morning and there’s a mass of short fat white wriggling things?

Too awful to contemplate so I'm not posting a picture of the maggots.

Instead, here's a photo of the nice worms that you should have in your worm farm.]

 

Worms%2Bfor%2Bworm%2Bfarms.jpg

 

You’re of course horrified and think “How did they get there and why? "

So now let’s find out. '

I'm talking with Sophie Goulding, environment project officer with a local council.

 

You need to get rid of those wriggling things because they’re maggots and they're there because probably you put that dairy or meat product into the worm farm.

Perhaps you did it on purpose knowing that your chooks will really appreciate a feast of protein that those white maggoty things have plenty of.

But if you didn’t, you’re best bet is to remove the maggots and put them into a small bucket.

Leave them to fry in the sun before adding them back to the compost.

If you don't get rid of them they'll get rid of your worms and there goes your worm farm.

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