Real World Gardener Burmese Honeysuckle is Plant of the Week

February 23rd, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Burmese Honeysuckle: Lonicera hildebrandiana

 

If you like the colour golden yellow and you like perfume in the garden, consider planting one of the world’s most spectacular climbers.


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The scent is to die for and it’ll knock your eyes out as well.

Yes, it’s a climber but you can let it scramble over the ground.

Let’s find out about this plant.

I'm talking with the plant panel Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

Play: Lonicera_Hildebrandiana_15th February_2017

Burmese%2Bhoneysuckle.jpgBurmese honeysuckle is a non-invasive version of honeysuckle but be warned it’s a climber on steroids.

Often said by Peter Nixon garden designer, " you might need a whip and a chair to keep this one under control."

 

What may entice you though is that its berries taste just like Gin and Tonic.

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Real World Gardener All About Frangipanis

February 23rd, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

Feature Interview

Frangipani Society of Australia

So many gardeners love the sight of flowering Frangipani's with their exotic scent, and colourful blooms.

Frangi's as they're known, can have a bewitching effect on the  collector, admirers and avid gardeners.

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Sometimes if you weren't a collector but went to a Frangipani Show, you suddenly became one because there are so many colours and cultivars that you just have to have.

Not everyone can grow them though and there are some helpful tips that need to be followed.

I'm talking with Anthony Grassi, Coordinator of the Frangipani Society of Australia's shows.

PLAY:

 

Why isn't my Frangipani flowering?

Often a question asked and her'es the answer.

Frangipani's need 6 hours of full sunlight to initiate flowering.

However, if you have a tree that was grown from seed, then expect to wait a minimum of 3 years, and sometimes up to 10 years, before it starts to flowers.

Cutting grown frangipani's will flower in the first year, but not in the second because the tree is putting it's energy into establishing a strong root system.

Flowering will recommence in the 3rd year.

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Fertilise when the claws first appear in Spring with a 6 months controlled release fertiliser and add granular sulphate of potash.

Sudden Impact for Roses is also a good alternative.

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Real World Gardener Orchids for Beginners in Plant of the Week

February 15th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

red%2Bcrucifix%2Borchid.jpgCrucifix Orchid.

Epidendrum ibaguense

 

For some people, orchid growing successfully eludes them but there’s a reason why.

Most supermarket chains sell the gorgeous and enticing moth orchid, but they’re not for beginners.

If you’ve failed with a moth orchid, (Phalaenopsis  spp.) you need to go for something tough and easy that you can practically throw onto the ground and it will grow.

Let’s find out about this plant.I'm talking with the plant panel- Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

Crucifix orchids are constantly in flower and don’t have any trouble clinging to rock, as their roots work their way into tiny crevices and cracks.

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Epidendrum ibaguense

 

Crucifix orchids have tough, leathery leaves along reed-like stems, which can be up to 1.2m long. The clusters of starry flowers appear at the end of each stem and come in red, orange, yellow, purple, white and salmon.

 

This is the perfect orchid for beginners as they’re incredibly tough and can be grown in any free-draining mix in pots or the garden, or simply tucked into a rockery.

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Real World Gardener Why We Need Worm Farms in Living Planet

February 15th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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LIVING PLANET

How To Look After Your Worm Farm? Getting Started.

 

Still not convinced about worm farms?

StartWormFarm.jpgWell did you know that in one worm, there is around 474, 075 million bacteria ?

These bacteria do an incredibly important job – mainly making minerals available to your plants.

From the reference “Earthworms in Australia’, by David Murphy,

When compared to the parent soil (the original soil), worm castings (the worm’s poo) have approximately:

 

7 times the available phosphorous: 6 times the available nitrogen

3 times the available magnesium: 2 times the available carbon

1.5 times the available calcium

So which worms go best in worm farms?

Let’s find out. I'm talking with Sophie Goulding, environment project officer with a local council.

 

PLAY: Worm farms part 2_8th February 2017

Worms like to be kept moist and covered because they're Sensitive to light.

Keep your worm farm in a shady spot so that they don't overheat and on hot days, give them a sprinkle of water.

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worms hate light.

The worms don’t create the minerals out of thin air but change their form from insoluble to soluble by digesting them.

That’s reason enough to get into worm farming.

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Real World Gardener Peppercorn Tree is Plant of the Week

February 7th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Peppercorn Tree Schinus molle var. Areira

Large trees provide lovely cool shade in the heat of summer and what’s not to love about a tree with drooping ferny leaves that keeps you cool?

You see these trees on rural properties lining the driveway leading to the home, but should they be grown at all?

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Peppercorn Tree

Let’s find out about this plant. I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

The Peppercorn tree is evergreen and grows to about 10 metres.

Bear in mind that this tree spreads readily by seed; is invasive in a variety of habitats including grassland, woodland and riparian areas; and is regarded as an environmental weed in most Australian states.

The berries from the peppercorn tree have been dried and ground for use

as pepper, but are not the source of traditional pepper.

 

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Peppercorn tree.

 

 

From Grow Me Instead choose an Acacia, or Eucalyptus torquata.

 

 
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Real World Gardener All About Worm Farms part 1

February 7th, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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worm Farms Series Part 1-All About Worms

Quite a few people are still not sure about whether or not they should invest in a worm far.

Is it too much work, where do you put the worm farm, and will it attract vermin are some of the questions that emerge?

But you can get away from the fact that a worm farm is a fantastic way to minimise food waste by turning your organic kitchen waste into nutrient-rich fertiliser for your plants and soils.

So how do the worms do it?

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Let’s find out. I'm talking with Sophie Goulding, environment project officer with a local council.

 

PLAY: Worm farms part 1_1st February 2017

Worms don't have eyes, but have areas or spots on their skin which sense light.

B because worms dislike light, you need to keep them in a shady spot and covered.

Worms have up to 7 hearts but if you cut a worm in two, the back half will die and possibly the front half as well.

Worms start of as tiny eggs the size of a fertiliser prill.

Out of each egg, 5-7 worms will hatch out.

Keep your worm farm moist but not overly wet. worms don't like to dry out, but if your district experiences heavy rainfall, check the worm farm to make sure that your worms haven't drowned.

We’ll continue the series next week but just to remind you that compost is a soil conditioner but worm-improved compost is a slow release fertiliser and biostimulant as well.

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Real World Gardener Organic Herbicides on Plant Doctor

February 7th, 2017

LANT DOCTOR

Organic Herbicides vs Inorganic Herbicides

 

Weed control can be the bane of gardeners’ lives if you have weeds that continually pop up year after year.

Wouldn’t you love to dispatch them quickly without harming the environment, good bugs and wildlife in your garden?

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Synthetic herbicides have a greater potential to contaminate surface water so if in the past you’ve succumbed to using systemic herbicides, here’s a good reason why you should put that down and pick up something better.

Let’s find out about what’s new. I'm talking with  Steve Falcioni, General Manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

 

Slasher%2Bimage.jpgThe sprays mentioned were those with (a) Acetic acid (vinergar) and salts. (b) Pine Oil based. (c)NEW, "Slasher" based on Nonanoic which is also called Pelargonic acid and occurs naturally as asters in the oil of Pelargoniums.

The advantage of "Slasher" is that it can be used on cloudy days and during winter. Acetic acid sprays rely on sunlight to burn or dessicate the plant you spray it on.

One thing to remember, these are knock down herbicides which doesn’t remain in the soil, so if new weeds come up, you’ll have to spray them again.

Systemic sprays are absorbed into the tissue of the plants like the roots, leaves and stems.

No systemic spray is organic and Glyphosate sprays have been proven to not bye "locked " by the soil and become naturalised. 

Glyphosate should not be sprayed near wanted plants whose root systems might be touching the root system of weed.

If you have any questions Nonanoic acid in weed control, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 
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Real World Gardener Illawarra Flame Tree is Plant of the Week

February 2nd, 2017

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Illawarra-flame-tree-for-we.jpg

Illawarra Flame Tree Brachychiton acerifolius
Do you need a fast growing tree or large shrub but not a Grevillea and it needs to be a native so it’ll attract local native birds?
If you do, then you can’t go past this one then because it’s a robust native tree, it’s only partially deciduous and has spectacular red flowers from early summer through to autumn.

I'm talking with the plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

This tree grows to around 10 metres plus in the home garden.

In a "good year" the Illawarra flame tree is arguably the most spectacular of all Australia's native trees.

Flowering  is usually in late spring  where the tree drops its leaves first.

This tree has large seed pods which if you’re a keen propagator, you can easily germinate the seeds.

Bear in mind though that flowering may take around 5-8 years from seed.

This tree is a food plant for the larval stages of the Pencilled Blue, Helenita Blue, Common Aeroplane and Tailed Emperor Butterflies.

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Real World Gardener natural Cleaning in The Good Earth

February 2nd, 2017

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REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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THE GOOD EARTH

Natural Cleaning in the Home

 

A lot of gardeners like to go organic because it’s good for the environment, safe for beneficial insects and it’s also good for our health because we’re not eating pesticide residue.

But what about inside the house?

We’re still cleaning with toxic chemicals whose manufacturer’s instructions tell us to wear face masks and gloves.

Some of these chemicals are so harsh that their smell is enough to make one feel sick.

natural-cleaners-Vinegar-baking-soda-sal

Not only that, the whole production process uses derivatives from oil or from mined sources.

Let’s find out about what else you can use to clean your house.

I'm talking with Margaret Mossakowska, President of Permaculture North.

PLAY: Natural Cleaning_25th Jan 2017

Switching to natural cleaning options is an important part of creating a natural home. Natural cleaning options can save time, money, and reduce chemical exposure.

The best tip is bicarb soda and vinegar to clean most things.

Vinerage is a mild bleach and can be used to clean the kitchen bench top, bathroom surfaces and even the toilet.

To clean your oven just mix a little water with bicarbonate of soda and place on the grease spots.

Wait a few minutes, then spray with vinegar.

This will foam up and lift off the grease.

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You can use normal white vinegar.

There’s also citrus infused vinegar.

All you do is fill a jar with (organic) citrus peels and pour undiluted white vinegar over them. Leave for a few days (up to 2 weeks) and strain out the vinegar to use as a natural cleaner. It works as a window cleaner (dilute with water), for mopping floors, or for disinfecting surfaces.

Isn’t that what people used to do in the olden days?

Funny how some things come around to again.

If you have any questions about the right tool for the right job, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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