Real World Gardener Vegetable Gardensand Terms part 4 in Design Elements

December 31st, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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DESIGN ELEMENTS

Designing a Vegetable Garden part 4: Terms Explained.

The debate is over according to the Stellenbosch University Botanical Garden in South Africa.

You can pronounce Clivea-that’s rhyming with Clive or you can pronounce it Clivvea like give.

They’re both acceptable pronounciations of that plant.

But what about other gardening terms and names?

Pronouncing them is one thing but what do they all mean?

We’re going through a few terms in this next segments so let’s find out…

 

Vegetable Garden of Lyn Woods in Ulverston, Tasmania. photo, owner/

I;m talking with Glenice Buck, landscape designer and consulting arborist

PLAY: Vegetable Gardens pt4_28th December_2016

Some of the terms that were talked about were 'crop rotation, Mandala garden, and no dig garden.

Crop rotation has a basic idea that you do not grow the same plant in the same spot every year – you have separate beds laid out with different plantings in each year.

Why do you do this?

The main reason is that you don’t want to deplete the soil of the same nutrients every year – for example cabbages will take in the same nutrients each year and then those nutrients will no longer be in the soil.  

It also means that you may reduce the impact of soil born disease getting established for example the same virus,  insect or fungus might attack the one species and if you continue to plant same species there number will increase in the soil as you are giving them what they are already attacking

Almost back to the principles of biodiversity.

What is an example of a crop rotation plan?

The aim is to not plant same species in the same spot each year – the first year you could use plants in the legumes family such as peas and beans this have nitrogen fixing bacteria within their roots – this means you can leave their roots in the ground after cropping and they can then provide nitrogen for the next group of plants such plants the brassica family …which require high levels of nitrogen such as broccoli, cabbages, kale.  Then the 3rd year you can use plants which don’t require much nitrogen such as root vegetables – like carrots or potatoes and beetrootsIf you’re new to gardening then concentrate on starting off with a small plot.

Lyn_Woods_Vegie_Garden3.jpgYou can buy ready made gardening troughs or planter boxes that fit the bill, or you can use large Styrofoam boxes, put in some drainage holes and fill them with a good quality potting mix but not gardening soil.

You can even have a veggie garden made entirely of pots with lettuce, basil, tomatoes and perhaps some chillies.

If you have any questions about designing a veggie garden, write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

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Real World Gardener Princely Poinsettias in Plant of the Week

December 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Poinsettias Princettia

This next plant’s leaves was used by the Aztecs to make red dye and the plants’ milky white  sap  was also used to treat fevers.

poinsettia_princettia-soft%2Bpink-300dpi

Poinsettia Princettia Soft Pink

For some reason this next plant is considered a must have at certain times of the year.

The bloke that this plant was named after also founded the Smithsonian Institute in America.

What is it? Let’s find out..

I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.auPLAY: Poinsettias_21st December_2016

The ponsettias that you see for sale have been tricked into flowering in the summer months when they would prefer to flower when nights are long and days are short.

In America they're cheap as chips with plants selling for $US1 on 'Black Friday."

Here in Australia, plant growers have to provide a greenhouse with thick block out curtains to provide that 12 hours of darkness Poinsettias need to initiate flowering.

Then for the 'old school" varieties, they need to be sprayed with a dwarfing compound which is quite toxic, requiring the nurseryman/woman to suit up in protective clothing.

With all that extra effort, Poinsettias are that much more expensive to buy here.

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Did you know that also in America Congress honor red Joel Poinsett by declaring December 12th as National Poinsettia Day which commemorates the date of his death in 1851.

Poinsettias can be grown south of Brisbane right down to Coff's Harbour, and north of Brisbane they will grow as far as the land extends, although they can be difficult to grow in frost prone areas west of the coast.

They can also be grown in warm parts of South Australia and in Western Australia's coastal regions, particularly in the north.

If you have any questions about growing Poinsettias, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Real World Gardener Autumn in Japan and Ephemeral Plants

December 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

FEATURE INTERVIEW

Autumn in a Japanese Garden and Ephemeral Plants

In Australia, only some parts of the country have defined seasons.

In other parts, sometimes it feels like there are only two season, slipping from winter to summer, cold to hot, wet to dry.

In Japan, there are definite seasons, and they are celebrated not by just visiting the spectacular parks and gardens, but by the food that is consumed by the Japanese.

Every thought of eating a fried maple leaf?

Chantelle%2BLeenstra_Garden%2BAtelier_To

Chantelle Leenstra in Japan (Own photo)

That's only some of the delights on offer when visiting Japan in Autumn.

I'm talking with Chantelle Leenstra, Prinicpla of Garden Atelier, Garden Designer and Public Speaker about her recent trip to see Autumn in Japan.

Play Interview here. 21st December 2016

Not all areas of Australia have defined seasons.

However, if you want to celebrate a change of seasons you can grow plants which only flower in specific times here are some of our suggestions.

For cool temperate districts, Japanese Maples and Cherry Blossoms, Nerines, Oriental Lilies, and Tree Dahlias.

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Golden chalice vine

For temperate gardens, Day Lilies,Golden Chalice vine (Solandra maxima), Canary Creeper(Senecio timoides)and Snake vines,( Hibbertia Scandens) plus Golden Rain tree (Koelreutaria paniculata.)

Tropical zones: Poinciana tree, and Frangipanis. Check out the facebook page of the Frangipani Society of Australia.

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Real World Gardener Vegetable Gardens part 3 in Design Elements

December 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 Vegetable Garden Series part 3-the planting stage.

Living in a particular place in Australia means that you have a particular climate and also means that if you’re into gardening that you need to know which climatatic zone you are in.

Some books suggest different zones to what you think you are in and in can be a bit confusing .

But it’s important to newbie gardeners to know what climate zone they’re in because it determines the type of garden you’ll have and the plants that you’ll grow.

We’re going through a few basics in this next segments so let’s find out.

 

Private vegetable garden of Lyn Woods in Ulverston Tasmania

I'm talking with Glenice Buck, landscape designer and consulting arborist.

PLAY: Vegetable Gardens pt3_21st December_2016

 

If you’re new to gardening then concentrate on what does well in your area.

Check the Bureau of Meteorology, local gardening groups and local newspapers to build a better picture of your local area.

In Australia we have 4 very broad climatic zones …

Hot tropics/subntropics

Cool Temperate

Arid areas

Hot Temperate

Very broad zones and then within these zones there are microclimates dependent on elevation and proximity to the coast. 

The higher you are the cooler the temperatures and the coast will keep temps more moderate – not as extreme.

These do get broken down into semi arid/arid climates, dry temperate and so on .

Of course every garden has its own microclimate depending if you live in a valley or on a hilltop.

How are vegetable classified or divided up?

Vegetables are basically divided into warm season and cool season

Warm season crops grow best when average temperatures 20 degrees

Cool season crops – best grown below 20 degrees

What are some examples?

Warm season

Tomatoes, sweet corn, French and runner beans capsicum, eggplant, cucumber,

 Cool season

Cabbage broccoli fennel cauliflower, asparagus, Brussels sprouts spinach, and peas.

If you have any questions about designing a veggie garden, write in to reLyn_Woods_Vegie_Garden1.jpg

 

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Real World Gardener Flavour Bursting Blueberries in Plant of the Week

December 22nd, 2016

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Blueberry "Vitality." Vaccinium corymbosum Vitality (high bush variety)Are you looking for something to boost your vitamin C without eating all that Broccoli? 

I know some Broccoli haters that would love this next fruit.

There’s a place in every garden or outdoor space for this evergreen plant that makes a great pot specimen or a low hedge that will end up being full of fruit.

I'm talking with the plant panel Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Blueberry vitality grows to 1m x 1m making a perfect low hedge and a great productive pot plant.blueberries_just_fruit.jpg

Light pink flowers appear during winter followed by fruit from late spring through to summer.

Blueberries have three common varieties: lowbush, highbush and rabbiteye.

Lowbush blueberries – This variety, which produces a big harvest of intensely flavoured blueberries, is not grown in Australia’s milder climate. It thrives in colder climates in the northern hemisphere.

Highbush blueberries – This is the most common variety in Australia, with many cultivars suited to the Australian climate. The two most popular cultivars grown here are the Northern Highbush and the Southern Highbush. Just to confuse things, the Northern Highbush is grown in Victoria, Tasmania and Southern NSW; while the Southern Highbush is grown in milder regions like Northern NSW and Southern Queensland.

Rabbiteye blueberries – This is another late season variety, which can cope with warm and humid summers and tolerate dry conditions like no other, making it right at home in Northern NSW and Queensland. Its name comes from the calyx, which when ripening looks just like little rabbit eyes looking back at you.

Grey green elliptic -ovate leaves (5 cm) growing 1m x 1 m.

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Real World Gardener Vegetable Gardens part 2 in Design Elements

December 22nd, 2016

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Style of veggie patches

If you do want to have a dedicated area in the garden for growing your fruit and veg you need to think about actual layout for the planting areas

What are the options? 

 Lyn_Woods_Vegie_Garden2.jpg
Lyn Wood Vegetable Garden Ulverston Tasmania

You can have an in bed system where it is really just grown as you would any garden area or you can do raised beds either by building them up with materials such as timber sleepers or just by mounding the soil up …almost like a burrow and furrow style.

Have we convinced you yet to start a vegetable garden if you haven’t got one?

It might seem like a lot of hard work, but you don’t have to build it yourself.

There’s plenty of pre-packaged vegie beds read for you to install.

But in case you do want to build one, this segment has some tips.

Let’s find out…I'm talking withGlenice Buck, landscape designer and consulting arborist.

PLAY: Vegetable Gardens pt2_14th December_2016

Those treated pinelogs that don’t have arsenic are called ACQ.(alkaline, copper quaternary.) 

 
Vegie Pod

vegiepod_from_bunnings.jpg

There’s also “ecowood,” that uses a different treatment method from ACQ and will last the distance too. If you do have CCA treated pine and are worried about the arsenic in the pine, the CSIRO recommends painting the logs both inside and out or line the bed with builders plastic.

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Real World Gardener War on Weeds Part 1 in Plant Doctor

December 22nd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT DOCTOR

War on Weeds part 1. 

 Physical and Cultural weeding practises.

Why is it that if you have strappy leaved plants in your garden, then grassy weeds colonise that plant just so you don’t notice them?

It’s not until those weeds start showing their seed heads that you realise that there’s a weed growing amongst that clump of daylilies or agapanthus.

weeds%2Bpart%2B1.jpg

Weeds sprouting in your vegetable garden include clover, petty spurge and panic veldt.

Then sometimes you just have to get down to ground level to see how many weeds have infiltrated that garden bed that you thought was thick with plants.

What can we do about them.

Let’s find out I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, general Manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

 

PLAY: :Weeds part 1_30th December 2016

Not only do they look unsightly put the weeds are stealing sunlight, water and nutrients from your precious plants, plus they're harbouring pests.

Often pests overwinter on your weeds ready to jump onto your plants when Spring arrives.

Hand weeds of course is great for small areas but for larger areas, perhaps hoeing or solarisation using black plastic is beneficial.

That old saying of 1 years seed gives 7 years weed holds true.

If you’ve just put away all your garden tools and cleaned up and then notice that clump of onion weed that’s in flower, the best thing to do if you haven’t got time or are just too tired is snap off those flowers.

Stopping the seeds from forming is a good start and the weed will still be there when you next get out into the garden.

If you have any questions pruning saws or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Delicious Persimmons are Plant of the Week

December 15th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Persimmons Diospyros kaki

This next plant is in fact a functional fruit with many edible uses.

They’re orange and can be put into your kid’s lunchbox unpeeled, and can be eaten sliced or whole like a pear.

You can dice and freeze them, adding them to a smoothie as a thickener.

They can also be dried, changing them from a crisp consistency to a soft, date-like, chewy texture. Eaten this way, they are deliciously sweet and taste more like candy than dried fruit.

What is this tree? Let’s find out..

Persimmon-Tree2-400x266.jpg

Persimmon fruit

I'm talking with the plant panel, Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

The Persimmon tree only grows to 5m so it's a small tree that can fit into any backyard, courtyard or even a pot on a balcony.

persimmon_tree.jpg

Persimmon tree has great Autumn colour

Trees are grafted making them a bit more expensive than other fruit trees to buy, but they're worth it if your love the sweet luscious fruit that they give.

Persimmons have a low chill requirement for bud break and flowering, which occurs in mid to late spring, after most other deciduous fruit trees and avoiding problems with late frosts. 

Did you know that unripe Japanese persimmons are full of tannin, which is used to brew sake and preserve wood in Japan?

The small, non-edible fruit from wild persimmon trees in Japan are crushed and mixed with water. This solution is painted on paper to repel insects.

This solution is also thought to give cloth moisture-repellent properties.

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Real World Gardener Starting a Vegetable Garden part 1 of 4 in Design Elements

December 15th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Starting a vegetable garden.

So you want to start a vegetable garden, but are not sure how to go about it.

Did you realise that it’s not just a matter of digging up a patch in your garden.

There’s so many more considerations and types of vegetable gardens to think about and over the next four weeks Glenice and I will be talking about all you need to know about starting a veggie garden.

Everything from the planning stage, to the build stage and planting out stage.

How do you start? Let’s find out…

starting%2Ba%2Bvegie%2Bgarden.jpg

starting a vegie garden photo Glenice Buck

I'm talking with Glenice Buck, landscape designer and consulting arborist.

 

Where you should locate your new vegie garden, ideally a sheltered sunny flat location with lots of organic rich fertile soil but this is not very often the case.  

Really you can locate them anywhere as long as the area will get enough sun for vegetables to crop. If you can manage it, locate your vegie bed as close to the house as possible so it’s an area you see regular – this will encourage you to use it, 

 

veggie%2Bgarden.jpg

Vegie garden photo Lyn Wood, Ulverston Tasmania

You could end up with something amazing like the vegetable garden in the above photo.

Growing your own food, even if you start small is such a great way to save money, control what goes into your food, and pick fresh from the garden even if it’s just herbs.

Don’t toy with the idea, go out and do it.

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Real World Gardener Food is Free Porject in Australia

December 15th, 2016

FOOD IS FREE

It seems like a far fetched hippy idea that food can be free but in some centres around Australia, the idea has taken off.

Food%2Bis%2Bfree-Weekly%2Btimes%2Bballar

Lou Risdale started the first Australian "food is free'project in Ballarat photo Weekly Times Ballarat.

Launched in 2012 and called the Food is Free project, the aim being to line your street with front yard community gardens which provide free harvests to anyone.

It kicked off in America initially but has had some support in Australia as well.

To find out more I spoke with a project team leader from Ballarat, Lou Risdale.

Lou's project is in a laneway in Ballarat that runs alongside her house.

This laneway receives a fabulous amount of sunlight and is a perfect space for people to either drop off or pick up free fruit and veggies.

At the moment, Lou has 30 volunteers that pass through the laneway a few times a day to pick off any spoilt fruit and veg.

food%2Bis%2Bfree%2Beastbourne.jpg

Lou’s was the first project of this kind in Australia. and now about 100 people a day come and go at peak times, to this laneway project and it has proven to be a great meeting place for them as well.

The gardens are built and offered for free using salvaged resources that would otherwise be headed to the landfill.

By using drought-tolerant, wicking bed gardens, these low maintenance gardens only need to be watered every 2-4 weeks.

This simple tool introduces people to a very easy method of growing organic food with very little work.If you’re interested in starting your own food is free project just go to http://foodisfreeproject.org where you’ll find a guide on how to do just that.

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