Real World Gardener STUNNING Mexican Lily is Plant of the Week

October 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Mecican Lily Beschorneria yuccoides

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Fitting right into the modern garden or providing a backdrop for the perennial or cottage garden, this plant is a true standout.
Find out more with the plant panel :Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au
Yes, who wouldn’t want contrasting grey-green foliage with a magnificent display of large, pink, bell shaped flower spikes held up high during Spring and Summer?
The Mexican Lily prefers full sun, but just as much success in a part shade position. Provided it is planted in a well-drained fertile soil and given room to grow.
Although one thing to be said for this plant is that it possess few of the annoying habits that spiky plants seem to possess, such as: Stabbing you.; Dying after flowering; Rotting in winter; Slow growth'

The plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au
Yes, who wouldn’t want contrasting grey-green foliage with a magnificent display of large, pink, bell shaped flower spikes held up high during Spring and Summer?
The Mexican Lily prefers full sun, but just as much success in a part shade position. Provided it is planted in a well-drained fertile soil and given room to grow.
Although one thing to be said for this plant is that it possess few of the annoying habits that spiky plants seem to possess, such as: Stabbing you.; Dying after flowering; Rotting in winter; Slow growth'

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Real World Gardener Creating Contemporary Gardens part 2 in Design Elements

October 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.


DESIGN ELEMENTS

Contemporary Style Gardens part 2

Last week we explored what makes up a contemporary style of garden.
It’s probably not a style that too many gardeners are familiar with so today we’re going with a second part but in more detail about what you can plant in this style of garden.

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Contemporary Gardens photo M Cannon

Let’s find out.
PLAY: Garden Styles_Contemporary_part 2_19th October  2016
That was Landscape Designer and consulting arborist Glenice Buck.
Contemporary gardens are really just present day gardens that don’t hark back to historical designs.
The contemporary garden palette doesn’t have a collection of plants but just a limited palette of plants with repeat plantings.
Choose from architectural plants such as Draceanas, Cannas, Allocasias, NZ Flax, Mexican lilies and Yuccas.
Alcantarea imperialis-  (Imperial Bromeliad) There are many different varieties of bromeliad, this is one of the larger growing species known for its grey green leaves.  It will reach approximately one metre in height.
There is also a variety known as “Rubra” which has deep red leaves.
Dracaena marginata – One of the hardiest plants you could grow in your garden. 


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Dragon's Blood Tree photo M Cannon

 It has rigid slender stems which hold its terminal heads of narrow leaves normally with a red margin.  This plant can be used in a range of conditions from a hot exposed site with little water to lower levels of light outdoors or even indoors in good light.
Agave attenuata – A succulent leaved plant known for its silvery green rosettes of foliage and its drought tolerance.   It will multiply easily and works well in mass plantings or as a potted specimen.
Cycas revoluta (Sago Palm) – Originating from Japan this species has palm like leaves which grow out in a radial pattern from the trunk forming a circular head of foliage.  These leaves are spiky to touch.
 

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Real World Gardener GREAT Watering Nozzles in Tool Time

October 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

TOOL TIME

Hand watering is often necessary to top up natural rainfall or irrigation.

Except you’re sick of continually buying watering nozzles for your garden because they keep breaking down and just not working.

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So you go down to the garden centre or big box store to see what is on offer because those cheap supermarket ones don’t seem to last.

There are three main types:(1)-hand held jet nozzle and (2) pattern or dial nozzle that can have up to 8 patterns  that include jet, mist, shower and soaker.(3)watering wand or elongated nozzle.

So which one should you get and is it money well spent?

This next segment answers all those questions.

Let’s find out .I'm talking with Tony Mattson general manager of www.cutabovetools.com.au

PLAY: Watering Nozzles_19th October 2016

It would seem the plastic watering nozzles are not an investment unless you want to buy one every few months.

Then you have to decide if you’re the sort of gardener that likes that dial with lots of different patterns or is quite happy with that sturdy jet nozzle that fans out to do the garden bed.

The blokes seems to go for the jet nozzle so they can hose down the path, wash the car and maybe fan out the water so it does a bit of the garden.

The ladies on the other hand prefer the dial type of nozzle with a variety of patterns.

Tony mentioned that often these nozzles clog up and either don't turn off or stop working properly because of either calcium build up or dirt.

Look for ones that you can clean out, such as pictured below from the Cut Above Tools Range.

Made of sturdy metal, the back can be removed and cleaned out.

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You can catch up that segment by listening to the podcast www.realworldgardener.com

If you have any questions about watering nozzles or have some advice to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Scentuous Boronia is Plant of the Week

October 24th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Brown Boronia and hybrids, Boronia megastigma

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This plant, Boronia megastigma or Brown Boronia, has a bit of a reputation for dropping dead soon after you brought it home.
Sure the intoxicating scent lured your to buy it in the first place and the mass of flowers seemed like a bouquet, ready made.
So what are the tips for hanging on to this plant?
So let’s find out. I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

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Boronia megastigma Lutea

Horticultural Notes:Don’t let the plant dry out but don’t overwater it, especially in humid weather because this plant and many other Australian plants are prone to getting root rot fungus that loves moist warm soil.
Yes the flowers stems are great cut for your vase.
Brown Boronia doesn't always come in the colour brown.
There are a number of cultivars have been selected which have more attractively coloured flowers while retaining the fragrance. These include:
Lutea - yellow both internally and externally.
Chandleri - burgundy-red on the outside, yellow inside.
Harlequin - striped yellow and brown on the outside, yellow inside

The biggest tip is don’t expect your Boronia plant to last for more than a couple of years.
The other tip is dappled sunlight and not hot afternoon sun.
Mulching with gravel seems to help prevent root rot, but most importantly, well drained soil is essential.

 

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Real World Gardener Creating Contemporary Gardens part 1 in Design Elements

October 24th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.
DESIGN ELEMENTS

Contemporary Garden Style part 1
This series is about garden styles and today it’s contemporary styles.
No, contemporary doesn’t mean astro turf, or concrete with a couple of plants in pots.

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Contemporary or Modern Garden Photo M Cannon

Nor does it mean minimalist planting.
It also doesn’t mean you have to have a modern or contemporary house to have one of these types of gardens.
So what gives? Let’s find out what actually makes up a contemporary garden.

I'm talking with Landscape Designer and consulting arborist Glenice Buck  .

Angular lines, plants with architectural qualities, low maintenance are all the aspects of modern or contemporary style of garden.

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Modern Garden photo M Cannon

Contemporary gardens usually have strong structural lines in their shape, they are used to make a statement or to be a focal point in the outdoor area.  They will vary in size and shape but the one thing all have in common is they use plants with strong form.  These plants may be short and spreading or tall and narrow but they will definitely stand out. 
So if you like architectural plants such as Draceanas and Yuccas, then maybe that’s the sort of garden you should plan.

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Real World Gardener, Inorganic Vs Organic Fertilisers in Soil Savvy

October 24th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SOIL SAVVY

Fertiliser:Inorganic vs Organic

Did you know that farmers have used fertilisers on their crops for thousands of years?

In fact Egyptians, Romans, Babylonians, and early Germans are all recorded as using minerals and or manure to increase the productivity of their farms.

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Organic Fertilisers photo M Cannon

But have you ever wondered how plants actually take up the fertiliser that you throw around on the soil?

After all the fertiliser is an actual solid mostly, so how does the plant use it?

Plus, is there a reason for being told to water in the fertiliser after you apply it?

Let’s find out . I'm talking with Penny Smith, horticultural scientist who specializes in soil science.

There are two groups of fertilisers: chemical based and organic based.

Organic fertilisers can be anything from processed green waste, to pelletised chicken manure and cow manure.

Pro's of organic fertilisers is that they contribute to a better soil structure in general.

Inorganic fertilisers are chemical based.

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Inorganic fertilisers photo M Cannon

However, they need to be broken down by soil microbes before being available to the plant.

The pros of inorganics is that they are immediately available to the plant without the middle man soil microbes.

Fertilisers are after all minerals that must first dissolve in water so that the plant can absorb them through their roots.

So in effect, the plant has to be able to sort of drink up the fertiliser, before it gets transported up the stems and leaves.

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Real World Gardener Beautiful Hellebores are Plant of the Week

October 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community RadioNetwork. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRNedition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his albumSongs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Hellobores, Helleborus x hybridus,

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They’re a dependable addition to your garden with flowers that last for many months from late winter to early Spring.
They love the shade , they’re not weedy and they’re quietly beautiful.
You wouldn’t think these plants would be on a plant collector’s list but they are.
So what’s so good about them?
So let’s find out. I'm talking with the plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

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 The flowers have five petal-like sepals surrounding a ring of small, cup-like nectaries which are actually "petals" modified to hold nectar.

The sepals  remain on the plant, sometimes for many months.

Flowers colours range from apricot, yellows and greens through to soft and deep shades of pink, maroon and even deep, dark plums or slate greys and, of course, cream to crisp whites.

There's also spotted or picoteed (narrow band of colour on edge of petals) whilst others may feature double petals for a ruffled, romantic appearance.

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Some say the secret to grow Hellebores is addling garden lime or dolomite.
Others say grow them under deciduous trees.
Lenten Rose is really only Helleborus orientalis, while those with a range of colours are hybrid Hellebores.
Wherever you grow them, grow lots of them, because that’s how they look best.
 


 

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Real World Gardener Creating Tropical Gardens in Design Elements

October 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

GARDEN DESIGN STYLES-TROPICAL
This series is about garden styles which RWG has visited over the years with different designers.
Saying the words tropical garden style probably conjures up swaying palms, white sandy beaches, azure coloured ocean with a backdrop of tropical jungle?

Certainly there’s a water element, and a palm or two somewhere, but what else is there and can you go tropical in cool temperate districts?

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Tropical Style Garden

All these questions are answered in the podcast. I'm talking with Landscape Designer and consulting arborist Glenice Buck  www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

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Tropical Styles in Garden Design

Large leaves immediately give you that tropical feel, and as for palms, be creative and go for more exotic palms like the Flame Thrower palm which grows a bright red new leaf.
Not all palms have to be tall.
You could perhaps choose the Walking Stick palm which grows to only 2-3 metres.
Whatever palm you choose, please don’t plant that weedy Cocos Palm whose leaves look like they been shredded by an eggbeater.

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Real World Gardener Grains of Paradise in cooking in Spice It Up

October 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

grains-of-paradise.jpgQuite a few hundred years ago pepper wasn’t so available so it was really expensive.

So what did spice merchants do to get the most out of this rare commodity?

They adulterated it with this Grains of Paradise, a particular spice that was considered inferior to pepper.

Now the tables have turned and this spice is the rare commodity and  it definitely isn’t used to bulk up your pepper corns.

Let’s find how to use it.

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of www.herbies.com.au and author of the Herb and Spice bible.

The Grains of Paradise plant looks just like a Cardamom plant with those mid green strappy leaves. The main difference is that the flower stems are  hidden down inside the leaves.

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Grains of Paradise plant

Grains of Paradise is still wild harvested and no commercial way of growing the plant has been formulated.

Although Ian recommends using Grains of Paradise in slow cooking, there are recipes on the web which suggest you can rub the ground grains onto your steaks, kebabs and fish before throwing them on the Barbie.

There’s even recipes which include the grains in marinades for vegetables, fish and chicken or in a lemon vinaigrette.

If you have any questions about Grains of Paradise or have some recipes to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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