Real World Gardener NEW Cottage Garden Styles in Design Elements

September 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Garden Styles: Cottage Gardens.

This series is about garden styles which RWG has visited over the years with different designers. 

It’s always good to revisit these styles to find out differing views as to what makes up the unique garden styles. 

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Cottage Garden Cotswolds

You may not have a particular style in your garden but after hearing this series you may want to incorporate some of the plants that make up the various styles. 

We’re starting of with a cottage garden style.

Let’s find out more.I'm talking with Landscape Designer and consulting arborist Glenice Buck

 Some of the main ideas of a cottage garden are not dependent on the exact plants but on how that garden is arranged, and how the plants are cared for.

Low growing perennials make up the backbone of a cottage garden with some accent plants here and there.

But what’s not evident is those clipped shapes but instead plants that are allowed to grow into one another.

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Scampston Cottage Garden UK. photo M Cannon

A cottage garden is known for its pretty flowering perennials. 

These gardens have a relaxed feeling with their informal style rather than a grand presence.  

 The plants are usually fluffy flowering plants seemingly growing into each other in peaks and mounds. The plantings are rarely in straight lines. Hedges would only be found on the outside or as boundaries of the garden.  Narrow winding pathways would meander, allowing visitors to wander and explore the garden.

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Real World Gardener Wedge Tailed Eagle is Wildlife in Focus

September 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

wedge%2Btailed%2Beagle.jpgWith a wingspan of up to 2.5m, and standing at least one metre tall, the Wedge-Tailed Eagle is the largest raptor in Australia.

A lanky bird, it hunts by flying up to 2 kilometres high, circling on thermal air currents for as long as 90 minutes and sailing out over the countryside, covering wide areas .

When flying, the wings have distinctive flight tips and its tail fanned and wedge shaped.

Let’s find more. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of www.birdsinbackyards.com.au

Tthe Wedge-Tailed Eagle is found throughout Australia, including Tasmania and will aggressively defend their territory, even against drones.

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Wedge Tailed Eagle

Earlier this century, when eagles were found on dead sheep and lambs, it was thought that they had killed them.

Bounties were paid to farmers for shooting them, (In one year in Queensland 10000 bounties were paid and between 1927-1968 in Western Australia another 150000.)

All that has stopped once people realized that the eagles usually attack only poor, dying or dead lambs and have little effect on the sheep industry. Today they are protected in all states.

If you have any questions about Wedge Tailed Eagles or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 

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Real World Gardener LOVELY Bacopa are Plant of the Week

September 21st, 2016

PLANT OF THE WEEK

BACOPA

bacopa%2Bpurple.pngThese next plants are quite low growing but are the sort of plant that flowers a lot and you can stuff here and there into rockeries and nooks and crannies in your garden, or if you like hanging baskets, they’ll trail over these.

They have a bit of a strange name so I’m surprised that marketers haven’t coming up with something more inspiring.
The flowers are pretty showy though so let’s find out what it is.
I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

bacopa%2Bscopia.pngIt turns out that Scopia is just a name for a series of 16 varieties of Bacopa.
Among them are the Gulliver varieties, which have very large flowers.
If you’re area’s climate is really warm, then Bacopa doesn’t like to grow there so much.
However Bacopa does grow well in dappled and semi-shade so there’s another choice for all those gardeners that either have different amounts of sun and shade in their garden where they need a plant that can cope with both.

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Real World Gardener Scented Climbing Schrubs in Design Elements

September 21st, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

A couple of weeks ago we started a new series on scented plants for your garden.

So many plants are lovely, with beautiful blooms, but only a smaller section of these also include a wonderful fragrance.

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Japanese Needle Flower

When it comes to shrubs you probably know Gardenias, Lavender,  and last week we talked about Jasmine, and of course there’s that ubiquitous Murraya that everyone seems to have.What about something different, something surprising.

Let’s find out more. I'm talking with Landscape Designer Peter Nixon.Don’t miss out on planting scent in your garden.

Peter mentioned the old fashioned Rondeletia that belongs to the shrubbery of old.

.Quite tall but with wonderful scent and much less trouble than Gardenia.



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Radermachera "Summer Scent."

For those looking for an alternative to the cloying scent of Murraya paniculata or Orange Jessamine, choose the Japanese Needle Flower or Posequeria longiflora which is very tough and eventually grows to 3 metres. However it can be pruned to much less than this.

There was also Radermachera "Summer Scent." This is a low alternative to Murraya.

Why not grow some or all of these plants so that you can turn your garden in to a perfumed paradise all year round.

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Real World Gardener NEW garden secateurs in Tool Time

September 21st, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

TOOL TIME

How many secateurs do you have?

Just the one?

If that’s you, then you’re in for a surprise because secateurs are like dressmaking scissors, or side cutters in the blokes shed, and that is you probably need more than one for the different jobs you might have in the garden.

So just in case you’re in the market for a new pair here’s some timely advice.

Let’s find out. I'm talking with Tony Mattson,  General Manager of www.cutabovetools.com.au

Orange-Anniversary-Secateurs-Straight-SnThe real interest gardener might have anywhere between 2 to 4 pairs of secateurs while the casual gardener may make do with one.

There were plenty of tips for updating your secateurs or adding one to your garden tool kit.

We only briefly mentioned left handed secateurs and cut and hold secateurs which are helpful for pruning roses so that cut branch can be put directly into your garden trug or whatever you’re using to put the prunings in.

There are also a new type of spring that looks like a coil rather than the traditional veloute spring for secateurs.

Florists use them day in and day out so look out for secateurs with those types of springs.

You can catch that up by listening to the podcast www.realworldgardener.com

If you have any questions about secateurs or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675 and I’ll send you a packet of seeds.

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Real World Gardener FAVOURITE ACACIAS are Plant of the Week

September 9th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

ACACIA FAVOURITES

The Plant Panel choose their favourite Acacias.

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Acacia leprosa Scarlet Blaze

Wattles herald the coming Spring with masses of mostly yellow blooms all throughout our bushland, parks and reserves and even in some gardens.

 

 

This mass display is mostly seen as winter draws to a close but did you know there’s one of these in flower somewhere in Australia at all times of the year?

Let’s find out what our favourites are?

I'm talking with the plant panel:- Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Plant Panel Picks

 Acacia leprosa “Scarlet Blaze

Scarlet Blaze It is a small tree or large shrub, growing to 5 metres high and 3 metres wide.

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Acacia baileyana flowers



All forms of Cinnamon Wattle, and so this one, have leaves that release a cinnamon-like scent from its foliage, particularly in hot weather.

Acacia baileyana "Goldilocks."

A Grafted Standard form of Acacia baileyana that makes a stunning feature plant to the landscape. It has grey fern like foliage and bright yellow rounded flowers that bloom in late winter to spring providing a mass display of grey and gold in a weeping waterfall habit.

No secret about this plant of the week because the Australian National Colours of green and gold are representative of the Wattle in flower.

Acacia cognata "Limelight"

'Limelight' looks fantastic all year round with its lime green foliage a stand out against many other common garden plants

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Acacia cognate 'Limelight"

Did you know that the wattle, specifically Acacia pycnantha was officially proclaimed as the National Emblem on the 19th of August 1988, but has been unofficially accepted as our Floral Emblem since federation in 1901?

It used to be in August but now September the 1st is National Wattle Day in Australia.

The Golden Wattle is an Australian Symbol  of unity, resilience and spirit of the people of Australia.

 

 

 

 

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Real World Gardener Scented Bulbs part 3 in Design Elements

September 9th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

A couple of weeks ago we started a new series on scented plants for your garden.
So many plants are lovely, with beautiful blooms, but only a smaller section of these also include a wonderful fragrance.

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Fill Your Garden With Scented Bulbs photo M Cannon
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Tuberose


When it comes to bulbs you probably know hyacinths and peonies and paperwhites as fragrant choices - but did you know there are bearded iris, daffodils, hostas and even tulip varieties with a luscious scent?

Let’s find out more. I'm talking with Landscape Designer Peter Nixon.

Some of the scented bulbs Peter mentioned are-

Polianthes tuberosa - Tuberoses

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Hymenocallis

Eucharist amazonica - Eucharist Lily

Amorphophallus riviera Konjac - Voo Doo Lily

Crinum x powelii

Hymenocalis literalis, speciosa, caribaea



So many gardens are planted without a thought to scent – perhaps because there has been such a shift to perennials, which are the least-scented group of plants.
They’re missing the third dimension – fragrance puts the whole garden onto another level.
Why not grow all of these plants so that you can turn your garden in to a perfumed paradise all year round.

 

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Real World Gardener Juniper Berry in cooking in Spice It Up

September 9th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

Juniper Juniperus communis

 

This small tree is native to desert regions so it’s hardy and drought-resistant.

But not only does this tree give your garden an interesting focal point with its fibrous and furrowed bark and attractive needles, the dried berries can be used to give your homemade gin its distinctive flavour.



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Juniper berries have a bloom.



 Conifers in general have pine cones however the Juniper bush has what appears to be fleshy berries with a large seed inside.

The berry  of the culinary Juniper, Juniperus communis, is somewhat smaller than a blueberry and and about the same size as an Allspice berry.

Let’s find out what it is. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of Herbies Spices and author of the Spice Bible

Juniper%2Bbush.jpgIan says Juniper berries are a demon to harvest because they don't all ripen at once, and the needles on the Juniper tree are very prickly, so you need protective gloves.

Make Your Own Gin

The berries can be used to flavour your own gin.

Start with some vodka to which you can add whole Juniper berries, some Coriander seed, and Grains of Paradise. You can crush the berries in a mortar and pestle if you wish.

Cooking with Juniper Berries

The piney flavour of the berries help to balance foods that are rich or cloying, such as Duck or Pork.

Juniper berries go great in a meat pie either used whole or crushed.

Juniper Trees

Unlike other conifers that have either needles or scales, juniper trees have both, sometimes on the same branch.

The needles have sharp edges and a pungent, distinctive scent, sort of like Rosemary with Citrus undertones.

The berries look like smaller blueberries, juniper berries also appear in red or copper, and are in fact soft cones.

Like typical hard and prickly conifer cones, juniper berries also contain the tree's seeds.

You can catch that up by listening to the podcast www.realworldgardener.com

If you have any questions about growing Juniper Berries or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675 and I’ll send you a packet of seeds.

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Real World Gardener Devil’s Ivy is Plant of the Week

September 4th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

POTHOS Epipremnum aureum

Are you looking for an easy-care indoor plant that will cascade and trail, and soften those hard edges? 

Goden%2Bpothos%2Bvine.jpgAre you looking for a plant with health benefits? 

Because this one (devil’s ivy)is known to efficiently cleanse the air of pollutants.

 

Researchers from NASA discovered that( Devil’s Ivy ) it was one of the top 10 most air purifying plants. The pores in the leaves remove harmful elements from the air and absorb them.

Let’s find out.  

I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

An evergreen vine growing to 20 m  tall, with stems up to 4 cm  in diameter, climbing with the aid of aerial roots which adhere to surfaces. 

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Pothos growing in the rainforest

The leaves are alternate, heart-shaped or ovate (in aureum), entire on juvenile plants, but irregularly pinnatifid on mature plants, up to 100 cm long and 45 cm broad.

Leaf colour vary from white, yellow, or light green variegation.

Aureum has glossy bright green ovate leaves spotted and streaked with cream or yellow 

This plant produces trailing stems when it climbs up trees and these take root when they reach the ground and grow along it. The leaves on these trailing stems grow up to 10 cm long and are the ones that attach.

Avoid if you have house pets that are likely to chew plant leaves, as the plant is highly toxic if any part of it is consumed. 

Of course you don’t have to grow it indoors because this lush vine does well in most environment's, offering growers a chance to enjoy the plant almost anywhere in the Australia.

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Real World Gardener Scented Climbing Plants part 2 in Design Elements

September 4th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Scented Climbing Plants part 2

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Hoya pubicalyx "Shooting Star."

Last week in this new series of scented plants we started with those climbing plants with scent.

But there was so much to say, that we had to make another part.
Let’s find out more. I'm talking with Landscape Designer Peter Nixon.

Some of the plants Peter mentioned are Hoya carnose, the Hoya that most people know.

There is also Hoya pubicalyx "Red Buttons,' Hoya bella, Hoya multiflora "Shooting Star:, which as a gum leaf shaped leaf.

 

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Akebia quinata
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Hoya multiflora

 

For cooler climates Peter mentioned Akebia quinata or Five Leaved Chocolate Vine.

All are good for container planting in a warm temperate climate down to 3 degress Centrigrade.

Of course other segments in the series on scented plants will be about scented shrubs, scented trees , scented bulbs, roses, scented leaves, and even a cool temperate segment. 

All of these plants so that you can turn your garden in to a perfumed paradise all year round.

 

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