Real World Gardener ZZ Plant is Plant of the Week

August 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Zamioculcus%2Bzamifolia.pngZanziber Gem: Zamioculcus zamifolia

 A popular houseplant which has been around for over a hundred years, but most wouldn’t have heard of it until 10 or 15 years ago.

Why it’s so popular is it’s perfectly suited to the black or brown thumb gardeners because it’s unbelievably tolerant of a wide range of conditions.

It’ll allow you to forget to water for months at a time;  put up with dark conditions that would make a Mother –in-laws Tongue plant (Sansevieria trifasciata) turn up its toes, they're okay with no humidity and are more or less pest-free.

Let’s find out more.

I'm talking with the plant panel:Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Zanzibar Gem is a herbaceous clumping plant growing to 45–60 cm tall, from a stout underground, succulent rhizome.

 

zanzibar%2Bleaves.jpg
Zanzibar Gem

Pinnate leaves (arranged like a feather),  40 -6- cm long with 6-8 pairs of leaflets.

Leaves are smooth, leathery, shiny and dark green.

Overwatering is likely to kill the plant. Best to keep it on the dry side to prevent tuber rot.

So this is the  plant has been marketed as the plant to show to people who don't know what they're doing, who have never had plants before, who aren't home much, etc

Mind you some green thumbs have been known to kill it.

 

 

 


 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Scented Climbing Plants part 1 in Design Elements

August 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 

How many gardeners do you know of that don’t like perfume or scent in the garden?

Hopefully, those of you listening to this program like scented plants because scent adds an extra dimension to a garden, turning it into a place where you linger, indulging your senses rather than rushing through to the front door or garden shed.

1-1-DSC_0190.JPG
Stephanotis floribunda: scented climber photo M Cannon

Let’s continue this new series on scented plants for the garden with part 12of scented climbing plants.

I'm talking with Landscape Designer Peter Nixon.

With the wide range of temperatures in Australia, there are a huge variety of fragrant plants that can be grown.

1-Chenomorpha%2Bfragrans.JPG
Chenomorpha fragrans: Climbing Frangipani photo M CAnnon

 

Many flower during the colder months so that even when there’s not much colour in the garden you can still have plenty of fragrance.Use plants that flower in different seasons to turn your garden into a perfumed paradise all year round.

 

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Which Fertiliser in Plant Doctor

August 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community RadioNetwork. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT DOCTOR

Fertilisers

How well do you know your fertilisers?

Whether you add organic matter or fertiliser to your soil, you provide your plants with three basic building blocks.

1-HOM_5247.JPG
Fertilisers: Inorganic vs Organic photo M Cannon

These are nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, often referred to by their chemical symbols of N (nitrogen), P (phosphorus) and K (potassium or potash).

Packaged fertilisers list the amounts of NPK each product contains, often showing it in a ratio format, called the NPK ratio.

But which ones should you use?

Let’s find out..I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, General Manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Soil microbes need to break down the fertilisers into a soluble form so it can be taken up by the roots of the plants.

Soil microbe activity depends on soil temperature and soil moisture.

In cold climates, microbial activity slows down to a crawl, but so does the plant's uptake of nutrients.

In warmer climates, soil microbial activity is year round and the decision as to which fertiliser to use is down to convenience.

Liquid fertilisers are fast acting but need to be applied fortnightly for the most part.

Solid, granular and pelletised organic fertilisers are best applied to the soil when the soil microbe activity is the most active.



1-HOM_5250.JPG
Controlled release vs slow release fertilisers photo M Cannon



The way plants use nutrients is quite complex and varies from plant to plant.

Some need lots of one nutrient but little of another, while others need a balanced amount of each.

Understanding which nutrient does what gives you a rough guide to selecting the right fertiliser for your plants and garden.

If you have any questions about fertilisers or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675 and I’ll send you a packet of seeds.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Beautiful Cycads in Plant of the Week

August 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Cycas revoluta SAGO PALM

 

Did you know that the term Gymnosperm that’s used to classify or define conifers or pine trees and cycads means naked seed?

That’s because the seed doesn’t come from a flower because conifers don’t have flowers but the seeds develop on the surface of the pine cones, which is the reproductive structure.

SagoPalm.jpg
Cycas revoluta; Sago Palm

That’s how plants evolved around 200 million years ago.

This plant doesn’t have flowers either but it’s not a conifer.

Let’s find out more with the plant panel:Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

PLAY: Cycas revoluta_17th August_2016

The leaves are a deep semiglossy green and about 50–150 cm  long when the plants are at the cone bearing stage.

Cycas_revoluta-2.jpg
Cycas revoluta

They grow out into a feather-like rosette to 1 m in diameter. T

he crowded, stiff, narrow leaflets are 20 cm long and have strongly recurved or revolute edges hence the latin species name of  Cycas revoluta.

Of all the cycads, Cycas revoluta is the most popular in gardens and parks.

It’s called Sago Palm but it has no links to actual palms which are flowering plants and therefore Angiosperms.

It’s seen in almost all botanical gardens, in both temperate and tropical locations.

In many areas of the world, it is heavily promoted commercially as a landscape plan.

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Update Your Garden With Different Shapes of Plants in Design Elements

August 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Updating Your Garden with Different Shaped Plants.

Have you updated the flower colour in your garden yet?  Or are you considering putting in some grasses, or strappy leaved plants with coloured foliage?

Are you thinking about moving some plants for a fresh new look?

 

Here’s something you mightn’t know or realise, and that is: a single species can have different leaf shapes over the life of the plant.

In fact, some can have different leaf shapes on the plant at the same time.

1-NOR_4839.JPG
Mt Tomah Botanic Garden photo M Cannon

For example, gum trees have different adult and juvenile foliage. That’s complicated enough, but what about the shape of the plant itself?

Good garden design takes the shapes of plants into account.

Did you know that you can update your plants using just the shape of the plant?

What does that mean?

 Let’s find out….I'm talking with Garden Designer Louise McDaid.

1-BLE_0871.JPG
Blenheim Palace garden, England. photo M Cannon

As Louise said, if one of your garden beds could look a bit better, think about introducing a different shaped plant, one with perhaps a vertical shape, like the ornamental pear, or a lollipop on a stick.P

erhaps a fountain shaped plant will fit the bill, like a weeping grass with stripey foliage- such as variegated Miscanthus.

Lots to ponder when thinking about updating your garden.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Striated Heron in Wildlife in Focus

August 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IF FOCUS

Striated Heron

The Striated Heron is doesn't get as much attention as other Australian herons because of its quiet nature.

butorides_striata_-_laem_pak_bia.jpg
Butorides striata; Striated Heron

 

With its short legs, black crown with striations or  stripes on its throat and neck that can either be grey or rufous in colour; it lives quietly among the mangrove forests, mudflats and oyster-beds of eastern, northern and north-western Australia, where it creeps about in the soft mud among the mangrove roots in search of prey such as fish, crabs and other marine invertebrates.

Let’s find out about it. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, manager of Birds in Backyards. www.birdsinbackyards.org.au

striated%2BHeron.png

These birds are a touch smaller than the white faced heron, and about the same size as Dusky Moorhens.

When foraging, these herons usually adopt a hunched posture, with the head and neck drawn back into the bird’s body, while keeping the bill held horizontally, parallel to the surface of the mud.

It may be small with short legs but it’s pretty good at stalking it’s food.

Slowly, either standing and waiting for prey to emerge or by sometimes plunging at it from a perch, before stabbing it with its sharp bill.

If you have any questions about Striated Herons or any other bird or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener GROW Soft Tree Ferns in Plant of the Week

August 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

SOFT TREE FERN Dicksonia antartctica

DSC_3280.JPGDicksonia Antarctica is a statement tree which will create a dramatic sense to any garden.

Easily established and maintained, this evergreen tree is guaranteed to intensify your garden.

Let’s find out. I'm talking with the plant panel, Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal

 

www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

Soft tree ferns live in moist areas with high water content in wet sclerophyll forests, along creek beds, in gullies and occasionally at high altitudes in cloud forests

 

Dicksonia tree ferns can grow up to 15m in height; it has large dark green roughly textured fronds in a spreading canopy of up to 6m in diameter.

 

They have an erect rhizome forming a trunk. They are very hairy at the base of the stipe. (trunk). The "trunk" of this fern is the decaying remains of earlier growth of the plant and forms a medium through which the roots grow

Fast Fact:

DSC_3281.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that the soft tree fern doesn’t reach maturity until it’s 23 years old?

 

A lot of places just name this tree fern but you mightn’t want the taller growing coin spot tree fern.

Look for Soft tree fern or Dicksonia Antarctica on the label.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Update Your Garden With Existing Plants in Design Elements

August 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Updating your garden with existing plants.
That simply means, moving some plants around the garden to give it a new look.
We’ve been updating our garden over the last couple of weeks.
 Starting with flowers and flower colour, then changing or putting in some new foliage colour. Perhaps some grasses or cordylines with pink or red, like Cordyline “Electric Pink” with a muted pink shade really.That was last week.

Today, we’re talking about what do you do if you just want to update your existing plants?

1-ADE_3642.JPG

Poinsettia can be easily moved. photo M Cannon

Sounds like you don’t have to spend a penny, just put in some hard yards in the garden to give it a fresh look.Let’s find out. I'm talking with garden designer Louise McDaid.

1-ADE_3924.JPG

Japanese viburnum can be easily moved to update your garden. photo M Cannon

How about moving some plants during the cooler weather?
I always find moving plants is very satisfying, especially if you move them into the right location where they just suddenly look better.
That’s a great way of updating your garden with existing plants.

1-RBG_4240.jpg

Cannas can be easily moved to update your garden. photo M Cannon

For those plants that can't be moved such as Salvias, cuttings can be  easily taken and the new plants planted somewhere else in the garden.
But think about it if your gardens need some of that type of adjustment like that, and make a note of where you would like the plants to go.
There should be plenty of ideas to get you started if you’re a beginner gardener, and some tips for those of you who’ve been doing it for a while.
The Helichrysum petiolare that Louise mentioned is commonly known as Licorice plant.
Helichrysum comes in two colourways, the traditional grey green foliage of the species and the lime green foliage of Helichrysum petiolare “Limelight.” Easily clipped into a bun shape or grown as a low hedge.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Paprika in cooking in Spice It Up

August 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

PAPRIKA Capsicum fruitescens.

Paprika is the most popular of spices and is found in many spice blends, especially for meat.



The Paprika fruit looks like a long and narrow chilli, but the Spanish variety is like a slightly squashed capsicum.

Alma%2Bpaprika.jpg
Paprika Red Banana



Paprika%2Bred%2Bbanana.jpg
Alma Paprika



 

The top quality grades of Paprika are called "Noble Sweet" and these have the best flavour.

 

Without this spice Hungarian goulash, Spanish chorizos and Indian tandoori chicken just wouldn’t be the same.

COOKING TIP:

Be warned, only use Paprika that's labelled Hungarian Sweet Paprika in your Goulash, otherwise the taste will be quite strong and unpleasant.

It's so famous in Hungary that there’s even a Paprika Museum in the town of Kaloscsa.

Let’s find out.. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, owner of www.herbies.com.au

 

That town in Hungary that Ian mentioned holds an annual Paprika festival every October.

Magyar-Hungarian-paprika-dried-peppers-a

Not only that, in the villages of Szeged and Kalosca, peppers are threaded onto long pieces of string and hung up to dry outside the houses and from garden fences.

Fun Fact:For those in the know, they can tell when the Paprika is the correct amount of dryness from the sound the dried Paprika makes when the wind rattles the peppers!

Cooking isn’t the only way Paprika is used.

Did you know some zoos use it mixed in with the feed to keep the bright pink hue of flamingoes!

If you have any questions about Paprika or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener BUSH TUCKER Ficus coronata is Plant of the Week

August 7th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Sandpaper Fig Ficus coronata

Bush tucker plants are one of the hot trends in horticulture and this one is no exception.

Ficus-coronata.jpg
Ficus coronate Sandpaper Fig

What about a tree that has leaves the not only feel like sandpaper, but can be used for sandpapering surfaces.

Let’s find out more about this plant by listening to the podcast.

I'm talking with the plant panel, Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

Ficus-coronata-main.jpg

Ficus coronata serves as a food plant for the caterpillars of the Queensland butterfly the common- or purple moonbeam. One of many host plants for the larvae of the Common Crow (Euploea core).

Good jam fruit but fussy to prepare because of hairs on skin.

Suited to a shady position in gardens, or medium to brightly lit indoor spaces. Like all figs in garden situations, they attract birds such as species of silvereye and rainforest pigeon.

Of the 1,000 fig species, most are tropical and 70 per cent of the animal life in the rainforest depends on them.

They are a “keystone” species: no figs, no jungle. Birds, bats, monkeys, gibbons, insects – all run on figs.

They are sweet – which means they are high in energy – and the trees can fruit/flower several times a year.

Aboriginal Women: Would use the leaves to "sand" there feet and nails.

Men: Would use the leaves to do the fine sanding of important artefacts and weapons.

00:0000:00

- Older Posts »