Real World Gardener BEST Camellias are Plant of the Week

May 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

CAMELLIA SPECIES: Which are your favourite?
There are many gardening books written and societies that you can join dedicated to the many flowerways of this next plant.



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Camellia reticulata Red Crystal photo M Cannon



 

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Camellia Grape Soda

 

Flowerways is my invention for the many flower type variations and colours that you can choose from.

There are even plant nurseries dedicated to growing this one genus with an endless selection that you can buy.

Surely there’s something that you could find to love for your garden.

Let’s find out what it is. I'm talking with the plant panel who were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au



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Camellia Easter Morn



Camellias Australia www.camelliasaustralia.com.au say that the camellia growing areas are in a coastal band on most of the eastern coast of Australia and the southern coast (and Tasmania) with occasional penetration of the interior such as Canberra, the national capital, Albury and Narrandera, and some regions with higher altitude such as the Central Tablelands of NSW and Mount Tamborine in Queensland.

So pretty much everywhere.

If you have any questions about growing Camellias, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

 

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Real World Gardener How to Measure Soil pH and Why We Should in Design Elements

May 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Now that you know what your soil pH is in most of your garden, or you’re going to find out soon, what’s the ideal pH for plants to grow in?

What can you do if you don’t have that ideal pH and how do you actually use that pH kit?

Let’s find out in this segment about soil pH. I'm talking with Glenice Buck, Consulting Arborist and Landscape Designer.



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Alkaline soil pH



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Acid soil pH

Just a reminder that soil pH is important because it influences how easily plants can take up nutrients from the soil.

 

 

 

If you’re soil’s too acidic or too alkaline, it will take quite a few months to change the pH, but that doesn’t mean you should give up now.

 

Measuring pH is easy even with the most basic kit.

All you need to do is dig up some soil samples from several parts of your garden, and spritz them with some water, but don't make the soil sample soggy. Next add a few drops of dye indicator fluid followed by a few shakes of the powder (Barium sulphate.)

Wait a couple of minutes and the powder should colour up.

You can then compare the colour of the powder with the soil pH chart.

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Real World Gardener Hygiene and Disease in the Garden on Soil Savvy

May 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SOIL SAVVY

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Tree rot photo M Cannon

Have you noticed some plants in your garden that look like they’re wilting even though you’re watering them?

Then the whole thing dies and you plant another one in the same spot.

Guess what the same thing happens.

Something’s going on with your soil surely?

Let’s find out what it is now.

I'm talking with Penny Smith, a horticultural scientist who specializes in soil science.

Your soil needs lots of animals or mini beasts and micro-organisms to be healthy.

Commercial compost although sterilised, does have some of these things because it's compost after all and does break down.

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Tree health reflects what is below ground. photo M Cannon

Root disease can occur when you've disturbed the roots.

Dieback here are there on the plant is one of the symptoms as is wilting and not recovering after watering.

The plant above the soil reflects what happens below the soil, so that if there's damage to certain roots from either disease or cultivation, then that will show up above the soil.

This might mean death of some branches.

Fungal diseases that grow in your soil are only growing bigger every time you water that wilting plant.

Before you replace it with another, take out soil from that failed location and put in a heap of compost.

Hopefully the micro organisms will overtake that fungus and so killing off that fungal infection and let your plant survive.

If you have any questions about disease in your soil or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener NEW Tea Tree in Plant of the Week

May 19th, 2016


REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Leptospermum laevigatum Foreshore

 

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Leptospermum laevigatum Foreshore photo PMA

Some native plants can grow in next to nothing soil, on rocky outcrops, be battered by salt laden winds and receive almost no water, but still keep on growing.

These plants have developed tactics to keep surviving in such harsh conditions so when you transfer them to your garden, they’re practically low maintenance.

Let’s find out about this new low native shrubs.

I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

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2.5 year old tea tree hedge. photo PMA

Leptospermum laevigatum Foreshore, grows to only 50 cm in height and is of course a tea tree. A native alternative to box hedges and is perfect for low hedge planting because not only are the plants tough but you won’t have to keep pruning them every couple of weeks to keep them to size.

 

 

 Once established it is reasonably dry tolerant requiring only occasional deep watering during extended periods of heat.

Tea trees can be planted in most soil types that are well draining.Best grown in full sun but will tolerate part shade.

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Real World Gardener What’s Soil pH? in Design Elements

May 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

SOIL pH series introduction



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Chlorosis, or iron deficiency



This next topic isn’t all that glamourous but can mean that your garden plants won’t grow as well if you do nothing about it.

Plants will be stunted, or have deformed leaves, even yellowing leaves with green veins can be one of the outcomes.

You’ll often read or hear the recommendation to check soil pH, but what does that really mean?

Pity about the topic name but let’s find out in this introduction to soil pH.

I'm talking with Glenice Buck, Consulting Arborist and Landscape Designer.

Soil pH measures the alkalinity or acidity levels in the soil.

This ranges from '0' to ;14' on a pH scale, where pH 7 is considered neutral.

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pH chart

Levels falling below 7 are acidic and those above 7 are considered alkaline.

Soil pH is important because it influences how easily plants can take up nutrients from the soil.

Did you know that plant roots absorb mineral nutrients such as nitrogen and iron when they are dissolved in water?

If the soil solution (the mixture of water and nutrients in the soil) is too acid or alkaline, some nutrients won’t dissolve easily, so they won’t be available for uptake by roots.

If you have any questions about measuring soil pH drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

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Real World Gardener Mint in Cooking in Spice It Up

May 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

MINTS

Originally taken as a medicinal herb to treat stomach ache and chest pains, nowadays it’s mostly called upon for soothing indigestion to heartburn and the common cold to bad breath.

There are three common mints:

  1. Mentha viridis or common min has a rounded leaf and not as bright as
  2. Mentha spicata or spearmint which has a more elongated leaf. 
  3. Then there's Peppermint, Mentha x piperita, which is a cross between spearmint and watermint.



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Mentha spicata



Not all mints are equal and if you want to add the best culinary type mint to your cooking then you need to pay attention to this next segment. Let’s find out what it is now. I'm talking with Not all mints are equal and if you want to add the best culinary type mint to your cooking then you need to pay attention to this next segment.

I'm talking with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

Not all mints are equal and if you want to add the best culinary type mint to your cooking then you need to pay attention to this next segment.

Herbies Spices sells dried mint which is imported from Turkey.

Peppermint wasn't known in the UK until the 1700's.

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Peppermint

Peppermint is mostly used medicinally and in sweets or confectionary, but not in savoury cooking.

Apple mint is a less common mint but can be used in cooking. Apple mint flavour goes well with peas and in mint ice.

On the other hand Eau de Cologne mint is not suitable in any recipe.

Although mint is easy to grow, its roots, which are called "runners," are also incredibly invasive: they quickly grow, sprouting new leaves and new plants as they go.

Mint will overtake a flower bed or garden in no time if you're not careful

If you have any questions about Wollemi Pines or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener NEW Daphne Perfume Princess is Plant of the Week

May 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

This next plant is for the lovers of fragrance in the garden.

And if you love fragrance, you’re probably going to buy plants that aren’t supposed to do well in your district.

Plants like Luculia, or Lilac (Syringia vulgaris) which are for cool climates mostly.

There’s another much plant that has a reputation of keeling over without warning, but gardeners still want to grow if because of its high fragrance.

Now, there’s a new variety with flowers double or triple the size of the old species (Daphne odora) and hopefully, a bit more resistant to some of the problems that plagued the predecessor.

So, what so good about it?

Let’s find out. I'm talking with the plant panel :Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

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Daphne Perfume Princess

Daphne Perfume Princess is apparently no ordinary Daphne and should be on every plant collector’s list.

Not only are the flowers bigger than the species Daphne, but it flowers longer, can grow anywhere in Australia and it has the strongest fragrance of any Daphne.

A definite must have.


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Real World Gardener Tropical Gardens and wildlife Design Elements

May 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Wildlife in Tropical Gardens

Would you think that tropical gardens are any good for wildlife?

Of course! Think Daintree and Kakadu for tropical and rainforest;

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Lorikeets in Drunken Parrot tree or Schotia brachypetala  photo M Cannon

Australia has some of the oldest and largest tracts of rainforest in the world, and they are teeming with wildlife.

So how can you get that into your garden?

Let’s find out. I'm talking with Louise McDaid, Garden Designer.

Australia’s rainforests stretch across the country and cover every climatic type.

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Daintree rainforest

From Queensland's Daintree Rainforest to Tasmania's cool temperate wilderness and to the Gondwanan rainforest near Byron Bay.

You'll also find dry rainforest pockets in Western Australia's Kimberley region and monsoon rainforest in Kakadu National Park.

Down in Victoria's Otway Ranges, exist lush fern gullies.

This lush landscape is home to species like cassowaries, parrots, pythons, possums, tree kangaroos, and primitive-looking reptiles, many of which live nowhere else in the world.

You may not attract these to your garden but you certainly will attract something from your local area.

So there’s no excuse for not having a tropical rainforest no matter what zone you live in.

If you have any questions about creating tropical gardens drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

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Real World Gardener Growing A Wollemi Pine

May 13th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

FEATURE INTERVIEW

WOLLEMI PINE Wollemia nobilis



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Wollemi pine photo Louise Brooks



The Wollemi pine is regarded as a Dinosaur plant because fossil evidence has dated it to have been around during the Jurassic period.

 

Way back in 1994, a chance discovery in the Wollemi National Park, by ranger David Noble and a couple of mates led to this tree being recognized as one of the rarest trees on the planet.

 

You can grow  buy a Wollemi pine for your home garden but need to know some expert tips as in the next segment.

Let’s find out what they are.

 

 

 

 


Louise Brooks is talking with Dr Cathy Offord, Research Scientist and The Australian Botanic Garden, Mt Annan.

She was speaking with occasional producer Louise Brooks.



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Wollemi pine photo Louise Brooks



Thanks Louise for that wonderful segment.

In the home garden, the Wollemi pine needs only 20% - 50% sunlight because that mimics the light level where they grow naturally.

Failure occur when Wollemi pines are grown in full sun.

Wollemi pines are the least heat tolerant of all the Araucariaceae family which includes Bunya pines and Hoop pines, disliking anything above 37 degrees centigrade.

They grow best on the south side of buildings and can be grown in a large pot.

Annually cut of the top of the Wollemi pine because they'll re-sprout.

Don't overwater or keep a saucer under the pot or container.

As for fertilising the good news is any general fertiliser will do as they haven't shown to be phosphorous sensitive.

Just remember that they have the potential to be large trees, growing to 35 metres in their natural setting, albeit very slow growing.

If you have any questions about Wollemi Pines or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener Chrysantheumum multiflora in Plant of the Week

May 7th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

CHRYSTANTHEMUM MULTIFLORA

Looking fantastic right now with their explosion of flowers that are so many, you can’t see the foliage.

This time the breeders haven’t held back with some of the variety names which include, Boulevard, Popcorn, Mars, Moulin Rouge and Clown.

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Chrysanthemum multiflora

 

So, what about growing your own?

Let’s find out which ones are so good. I'm talking with  the plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

Chrysanthemum multiflora grows dense and can reach an average height of 40 - 80 cm and a spread of 40 - 80 cm.

The flowers  of Chrysanthemum multiflora are about half the size of regular or more commonly grown garden 'mums' but the number so many, that it makes for a dazzling display.

Chrysanthemum multiflora or Garden Mums are prolific bloomers and are easy to grow, hardy, and available in a huge range of colours. They have different type of flower and bloom season to fit every landscape need.

•Anemone: 1 or more rows of petals with a cushion-like centre.

•Pompom: Familiar globular shape

•Regular Incurve: Petals curve up and in, forming a sphere

•Single or daisy: Looks like its cousin, the daisy

•Spider: Long, curled petals droop down and give a spider-like look

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Chrysanthemum multiflora

These are among the shorter, mounding varieties of mums generally grouped as ‘cushion’ mums.

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