Real World Gardener Edoble Flowers in Plant of the Week

April 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

EDIBLE FLOWERS

Have you wondered about a sure fire way to add a touch of elegance, colour and flavour to your recipes, perhaps to impress your friends when they come over for dinner?

Perhaps you want just a fun way  to add a bit of whimsy to get little ones to eat their food?

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Edible flowers photo M Cannon

Flowers belong to plants that have fruits and those that have vegetables. So can be classed as both, also because you can eat some flowers of both.

Edible flowers sounds like it could be good but is it?

Why would you eat flowers anyway and what flowers can you eat?

Let’s find out which ones are so good.…

I'm talking with the plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner.

www.thegreengallery.com.au

Why are some of Australia’s top restaurants, demanding flowers of violas, fennel, coriander, peas, rocket and Borage?

Edible flowers have been in diets for thousands of years.

sc_edibleflowerboard_2.jpgDid you know that Romans used edible flowers such as mallows, roses and violets in a lot of their dishes?

You’ve probably heard of and even eaten capers, but did you know capers (Capparis spinosa) are the flower buds of an Mediterranean evergreen shrub and have been used to flavour foods and sauces for over 2,000 years?

Don’t eat flowers from non-organic sources such as florists, supermarkets, nurseries, gardens, or roadsides as they may contain pesticide residue.

 Another tip is to add flowers gradually to your diet.

Edible flowers:

Some of the flowers we mentioned are calendula, roses and sunflowers ( for their petals) , violas, pansies, marigold, nasturtium, dianthus, freesia, stocks and cornflowers, daylilies, and chrysanthemums.

Most of the herb flowers are edible and may have the taste of the herb itself – chives, garlic, leeks , basil, rocket, borage, chervil, coriander, fennel, ginger, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, and thyme.

there are many more that haven't been mentioned.

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Real World Gardener Tropical Look for Coastal Gardens in Design Elements

April 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 



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Coastal Garden photo Peter Nixon



Tropical gardens seem to fit, hand in glove in coastal areas, because when we think of the beach, we might like to imagine that we’re in an exotic location with the lushness of a tropical oasis.

Think big leaves, colourful foliage and lots of flowers.

Let’s find out how to create this near the coast…I'm talking with Louise McDaid, Garden Designer.

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Paradisus photo Peter Nixon

Coastal gardens are affected by salt laden winds and sandy, nutrient poor soils so it's not necessarily easy to get them to work. Salt laden winds cause leaf burn on plants.

So, it’s important to remember that windbreaks, either planted or built form, and creating microclimates will help establish large leaved plants that might not thrive or do that well to start off with, but with a bit of planning.

Windbreak plants suggestions: Acacia, Lagunaria patersonii or Norfolk Island Hibiscus, Sheoaks or Casuarinas, Callistemons or bottlebrush,Vitex and Metrosideros or NZ Christmas bush.

 I’m sure you can get that tropical look for your coastal garden.

Close planting is the key, and layering with different plants at different levels or plants of different heights.

If you have any questions about creating tropical gardens drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com

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Real World Gardener Green Leaf Beetle of Lilly Pilly in Plant Doctor

April 28th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT DOCTOR

Green Leaf Beetle Paropsides calypso

One of the most planted hedges these days is the Lilly Pilly hedge.

So what happens when you have heaps of the same plants?

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Green Leaf Beetle photo Martin Lagerway

Not surprisingly, pests that like that particular plant will also multiply without the help of any production nursery.

We’ve already seen an explosion in the pimple psyillid that causes those little bumps in the leaves of Lilly Pillies, but now, enter another destructor.

I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, General Manager of eco organic garden. www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

The Green Leaf Beetle itself is 5mm long, bright green and shiny.

Not just a pest, but a native pest found originally in the north-east of New South Wales and that now has found an abundance of food in our gardens and has been known to defoliate a row of plants almost overnight.

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Lilly Pilly Hedge

It firsts starts off as only the edges of the leaves being chewed out and in some cases progresses to the central mid-rib of the leaf.

Then when plants are inspected there’s no sign of what did the eating because the beetle has gone underground or perhaps even flown to another tasty Lilly Pilly hedge.

You can try inspecting your hedges for the juvenile or larvae of the Green Leaf Beetle that are pale green and glossy, 2 cm long and look similar to a stretched out curl grub.

If you have any questions about the Green Leaf Beetle or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener Autumn Berriesin Plant of the Week

April 26th, 2016

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Berrries: loganberry;Raspberry;Blackberry; Youngberry

Did you ever go out to collect wild blackberries when you were quite young and come home with scratches all over your arms and legs?

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Youngberries photo M Cannon

Perhaps you were a bit more clever and carried a sheet of iron or a plank of wood that you plopped down into the middle of the patch to get the berries.

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. Nowadays you wouldn’t dream of doing that because blackberries out in the bush or nature reserve have probably been sprayed with weed spray.

So, what about growing your own?

Let’s find out which ones are so good by listening to the podcast.….I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au  and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au


The Berry Patch in a Pot™ Range features four great varieties of fruit that can be grown in any garden!

This includes Blackberries, Loganberries, Youngberries and Raspberries.

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Berry flowers. photo M Cannon

Youngberry is a complex hybrid between three different species from the genus Rubus, the raspberries, blackberries, and dewberries of the rose family. The berries of the plant are eaten fresh or used to make juice, jam, etc.

Loganberries:Rubus x loganobaccus Loganberry.

The Loganberry is a modern variety of fruit that was developed from an accidental cross between a raspberry and a blackberry.

Loganberries have look a bit like blackberries, but are more red in colour.

The vines or canes of the Loganberry  don't grow like either the blackberry or raspberry.

They trail or grow upon the ground.

 

The best part is that these plants are ideal for pots and containers as well as for growing in the garden.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Tropical Look for Outdoor Dining in Design Elements

April 26th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

In a lot of places in Australia, the days have begun to be cool down, so thinking of tropical plants for an area in the garden suddenly has become quite appealing.

Even if you live in an arid zone or cool temperate area, you can still achieve that tropical look with plants that grow well in your local district.

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Paradisus Gardens photo Peter Nixon

Knowing how to arrange them is the key to achieving that tropical look, and around the entertainment area, it might be de rigour.

Choose a dining setting that suits your lifestyle; perhaps a daybed? For the tropical look think of Wicker, Bamboo or Teak furniture fits into the Tropical theme.

The whole garden doesn’t have to be tropical.

You can use bold leaves and different types of foliage colour in any climate.

Create some shade with tall palms, such as Gold Cane or Lipstick Palm. For taller palms, try Bangalow or Kentia Palms.

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Paradisus Gardens photo Peter Nixon



For the mid level think of Gingers, Cordylines, Canna lilies, Hibiscus and Birds of Paradise are some of the types of plants that you can choose from.

For the lowest level, pick from Bromeliads, ferns, and Calathea.

If you live in a cooler  or arid area, you might have a tropical theme within your garden style.

Somewhere in your garden where you like to sit and read or think, you can add a tropical touch here and there, with plants that are suited to the climate you live in.

There is a microclimate that suits those plants that were mentioned. You get the idea.

 

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Real World Gardener Lemongrass in cooking in Spice It Up

April 26th, 2016

.REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus)

lemongrass%2Bstalks.jpgIs in the Poaceae family (grasses,) and was not only used  by the ancient Greeks and Romans but crops up in so many cuisines throughout the world.

Lemongrass has also been used in folk medicine and in Asian cooking.

Lemongrass is a herb, or grass really,that  has more attributes as an all round herb than you might’ve thought of.

In this segment, you’ll learn about not only the best ways to use it in the kitchen but some great tips and looking after it in the garden.

Let’s find out more about this herb. I'm talking with Ian Hemphill, from www.herbies.com.au

Lemongrass flavour is fairly gentle so you can’t go wrong in how much you use.



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Lemongrass



Use only the bottom 15-20 cm and give it a bump with the back of a knife to easily peel off the outer layer.

 

Cut it very finely or either shave it finely or grate your lemongrass so you don’t get those hairs or fibres from the leaves so much when you’re eating the dish.

 

BIG TIP: Don't throw away the green leafy tops but tie them into knots to break up the citral structure and throw this bunch into cooking to infuse with a real lemony flavour.

Think of it as a substitute for lemon zest if you like for use in cooking.

 

When growing your own lemongrass, it's best if divided every few years because the centre of the clump doesn't seem to get enough water and nutrients and dies off.

 

If you have any questions about lemongrass or any other herb or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

 

 

 

 

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Real World Gardener Grey Plover is Wildlife in Focus

April 23rd, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Did you know that Australia provides habitat for millions of migratory birds each year?<?xml:namespace prefix = "data-blogger-escaped-o" />

Some of these birds fly amazing distances when they migrate.

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Grey Plover photo www.birdlife.org

Today’s bird in Wildlife in focus is the Grey Plover which is a special and unusual migratory shorebird that we know very little about.

It’s the largest plover we have in Australia of its type and we know that they migrate an amazing  12,000km to breed in northern Siberia and Alaska during the northern summer and return to spend our summer in Australia.

. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, Manager of Birds in Backyards. www.birdsinbackyards.net

So the grey Plover can be described as having a strongly barred tail.

We can see them all around the coastline of Australia at inlets, estuaries lagoons, and tidal salt marshes.

Oddly enough, the majority of Grey Plovers that migrate to Australia are female. No-one knows why.

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Grey Plover, photo Birds in Backyards

They spend their summer here and from March to April, head north, stopping to re-fuel in Korea, and China's Yellow Sea.

Grey Plovers mostly eat crustaceans, polychete works and other invertebrates.

Because shore birds like the Grey Plover are along the coastline if you notice that there’s a flock of shore birds, not just you’re common seagull, but birds like the grey plover, then you can help by not disturbing them and keeping your dog on a lead.

Threats to migratory birds have grown with habitat destruction especially of stopover and wintering sites, as well as structures such as power lines and wind farms.

The conservation of important sites both within Australia and along their migration routes is really important to their survival.

If you have any questions about Grey Plovers or any birds or have some information to share, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener Autumn Plant Suggestions in Plant of the Week

April 17th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK



primulas1.jpg
Primula



What’s your Autumn garden looking like right now?



heucheras.jpg
Heucheras



Are there plenty of flowers, perhaps roses, are there autumn colours of trees that are starting to lose their leaves.

If there’s a few spots that you can add a little something, autumn is the best time to plant, so the plant panel got our heads together and picked out 3 plants that are true winners.

Let’s find out which ones are so good. I'm talking with Karen Smith www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, plant nursery owner, www.thegreengallery.com.au

 


 

The plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner.

One of the stars of the Autumn garden is definitely the Japanese windflower, and they’re so easy to grow and fit well planted amongst Camellias.

Heucheras on the other hand have many different types of leaf colour making a bold statement in any garden, even in vertical gardens.

Primulas (Primula obconica) fit well into any garden and if you look for the "Libra" range of Primul,s these are NEW and have been bred without PRIMIN.

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Jap_wind%252BAnemone.jpg
Japanese wind flowers



 

 

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Real World Gardener Tropical Gardens Around The Pool n Design Elements

April 17th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Tropical gardens for everyone series part 1

What do you think of when the word Tropical garden is said?

Swaying palms, coloured cocktail drinks with umbrellas in them, lying in a hammock swaying gently in the breeze? Dipping you toes into a pool?

tropical%2Bgardens%2Bby%2Bpool1.jpg

Perhaps you did all these things on your last holiday to a tropical isle, but wait, you can have it at home as well.

But aren’t tropical gardens definitely for the tropics right? Wrong.

Maybe not all of it, but at least some of the features.

Over the next five weeks, Design Elements will be talking about Tropical Gardens to suit any climate in Australia. Today, you’re going tropical around the pool in part 1 of this series.

I'm talking with Landscape Designer Louise McDaid

The whole garden doesn’t have to be tropical.

If you live in a cooler or arid area, you might have a tropical theme within your garden style. Somewhere there is a microclimate that suits those plants that were mentioned. You get the idea.

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Real World Gardener NEW Euphorbia Diamond Frost in Plant of the Week

April 8th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

New Euphorbias:Euphorbia Diamond Frost

Euphorbia Stardust Pink Glitter and Euphorbia Stardust White Sparkle.

Some of you may know Euphorbias in the perennial border.

Did you know that the variation within this genus is amazing, some people might even say awesome.

From low-growing garden weeds called petty spurge to giant, cactus-like succulents.

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Euphorbia Diamond Frost

Segue to an annual called Gypsophila or baby’s breath. What do they have in common with several newish cultivars of Euphorbia for your garden

Let’s find out …I'm talking with the Plant Panel; Karen Smith editor of Hort Journal magazine, and Jeremy Critchley wholesale nursery owner www.thegreengallery.com.au

The petals are actually small and dainty like baby’s breath, but there are so many of them that the leaves are scarcely visible.

These new delicate looking but tough, high impact Euphorbia plants flower every day of the year in warmer climates.

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Euphorbia Diamond Frost

Stardust is more compact than Diamond Frost and is ideal for patio pots and garden borders in full sun positions.

 

Heat and drought tolerant, a truly low maintenance plant.

 

Euphorbias all produce a mostly white latex which they oozes out of the stems when cut, and this sap is often toxic.

 

If you have any questions about growing Euphorbia white Stardust or Pink Stardust why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

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