Real World Gardener New Dahlia Hybrids Plant of the Week

February 27th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Dahlia species.

I remember hiding amongst the large Dahlia bushes as a little girl.

There seemed to be only a few colours that my father could get, we lived in a small country town in South Australia, and the Dahlias were a  dark crimson purple to light pink.

As long as we lived in that house he would replant them in the same spot, near the front fence every year. The rest of the garden had mostly vegetables and fruit trees.

1-HOM_5045.JPG

Dahlias photo M Cannon

 

Would you like to grow a small bush that’s just like a bunch of flowers?

Known as the “queen of the autumn garden’ the old fashioned Dahlia varieties of this plant grew into quite a large bush that needed staking.

The new varieties are plants that are small enough just to grow in a pot and when it’s covered in flowers you can bring it indoors and use it instead of a bunch of flowers.

Let’s find out more. I'm talking with the plant panel - Karen Smith editor of Hort Journal and Jeremy Critchley, the owner of the Green Gallery Nursery, www.thegreengallery.com.au 

Dahlia plants range in height from as low as 30cm tall as 2-3 metes. The flowers can be as small as 5cm or up to a 30cm in diameter.

There are literally thousands of cultivated varieties of Dahlias which have been hybridized throughout the years.

1-HOM_5046.JPGYou can leave your Dahlia tubers in the ground in warmer areas.The black leaf variety "Dahlia Summer Days" are not as susceptible to powdery mildew and spider mite, plus only growing to 30cm in height they don't need staking.

It may surprise you to learn that the Dahlia flower is the national flower of Mexico, most likely because it native to the country.

When given as a gift, the dahlia flower expresses sentiments of dignity and elegance.

Dahlias are also a symbol of commitment and bond that lasts forever. 



1-HOM_5049.JPG

Dahlia Summer Days - a single variety. photo M Cannon



Maybe not so much today, but the dahlia flower was used in gardens and flower arrangements to celebrate love and marriage.

If you have any questions about growing the new Dahlia hybrids or have some information to share, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

tamarind%2Btree%2Band%2Bfruit.jpg



00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Garden Challenges Series, Impact Damage on Foliage part 2 in Design Elements

February 27th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

This garden series with Garden Designer Peter Nixon, is all about garden challenges thrown at us mostly by nature but also due to a situation in your garden that you might need to fix.

 



1-HOM_5055.JPG
Impact damage on Bromeliads



So far we’ve been covering hail damage, but will also cover sun scorch, garden loopers, and a few other odds and sods that aren’t necessarily damage but a garden challenge all the same.

 



1-HOM_5056.JPG
Impact damage on Begonias.



 

Today’s garden challenge is about foliage dependent damage mainly from hail, but we’re delving more into what you should do with different plants that have been affected.

I'm talking with Peter Nixon, garden designer and

Lots of tips there for Bromeliad, tropical and rainforest gardens.

Don't reach for the secateurs on your Bromeliads that have been split longitudinally.

Leave your plant for a week or two, because the plant may be able to re-direct the starch from the damaged leaves to the growing point, and you'll be depriving the plant from resources to come back with.

 

1-HOM_5058.JPG
Bromeliads with hail/impact damage. Photo M Cannon
If the terminals are intact on your Kalanchoe, you can cut back to just above the bud and it will re-flush.

It may take a year to recover, but it will recover.

For dented type of damage on  succulents such as Crassula, cut that away too.

It’s not just the leaves that get affected by the damage, but take a closer look at the stems, branches and trunk of your trees and shrubs to see if they’ve been hit as well.

If you  have any questions about hail damage in your garden, write in and let us know what happened our email address, or just post it realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener The Right Tool for the Right Job in Tool Time

February 27th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

TOOL TIME

Do you have all the tools you need to do those cutting jobs in the garden?

Secateurs are good for small pruning jobs where you can cut stems and branches about the size of your first finger.

Generally if it's green it cuts more easily than hardened branches sometimes found lower down on shrubs and hedges.

cut%2Band%2Bhold%2Bpruners.JPG
Cut and Hold pruners. Photo. Cut Above Tools

For the harder stems you might need to reach for something bigger.
Or are you struggling with some old secateurs and a rusty pair of garden loppers?
Don’t know what loppers are?
Let’s find out about what tools you should be using for those pruning jobs in the garden. I'm talking with Tony Mattson, General Manager of www.cutabovetools.com.au

Some long handled pruners use the "cut and hold," method. They're about 3 metres long when extended and have a trigger. The beauty of "cut and hold" loppers is that once you've pruned it, you can bring the pruned branch down.

1-HOM_5053.JPG
Well used garden tool selection.

Good for tops of Camellias or getting the fruit of mango and avocado trees.
The best tip is to hold the pruning tool that you’re thinking of buying for at least a minute to see if you can stand the weight.
This is a good idea because when you’re pruning your garden shrubs, hedges roses or whatever, you’ll be out there for a lot longer than a minute or two.
So if you think that long handled lopper is too heavy for you, don’t get the tool.
If you have any questions about the right tool for the right job, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Hibiscus Rose Mallow is Plant of the Week

February 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Hibiscus rosa-chinensis: Hibiscus moscheutus

Rose Mallow

Hibiscus%2Bstate%2Bflower%2Bhawaii.jpg

This next flower is the official state flower of Hawaii, so it’s no surprise that when you see the shrub covered in those flowers that you can’t help but think of sandy beaches, aquamarine seas and grass skirts. 

Let’s find out more.

I;m talking with the plant panel:

Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

PLAY: Hibiscus_17th February_2016

The common Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-chinensis) that you see in many gardens, grows to about 3 metres tall.

Vigorous growing and best pruning at the beginning of Spring because they flower on new wood.

Hibiscus moscheutos or Rose Mallow Rose Mallow are native to swamps, wetlands and along creek edges in the southeast United States.

These Hibiscus are herbaceous so are good for cold climates because the plant has died down.

Growth is to 80 cm and these Hibiscus prefer shade and part shade.



Hibscus%2Bmoscheutus%2Bpink%2Bswirl.jpg
Hibiscus moscheutus "Pink Swirl.'



 

All Hibiscus thrive if you give them lots of organic matter with an addition of Potash.

 

Generally Rose Mallow comes in pink white and red coloured flowers, that's the Luna series which are the only ones available in Australia.

 

According to growers, they can get up to 80 - 100 flowers, however, the flowers only last a day.

Plant them in a sandy but moisture retaining, slightly acidic soil that has been  enriched with compost or other organic material.

Water regularly and thoroughly during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system.

 

TIP:

Rose Mallow plants should never be allowed to completely dry out, or they’ll immediately stop blooming. 

Plants resent any disturbance to their root system so be extremely careful, soak the soil thoroughly and dig wide before attempting to transplant your Hibiscus. 
 

Hibscus%2Bmoscheutus%2Bred.jpg
Hibiscus moscheutus "red"

A Bit if Trivia

The official state flower is the yellow hibiscus (Hibiscus brackenridgei), also known as the pua aloalo.
Hawaiians originally adopted the hibiscus flower (of all colors) as their official Territorial flower in the early 1920s. 
It wasn’t until 1988, however, that Hawaii’s legislature legally adopted the yellow hibiscus as the official state flower.
The hibiscus originated in Asia and the Pacific islands. It’s believed that there were originally only five hibiscus species native to the Hawaiian islands.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Garden Challenges Series, Impact Damage on Foliage in Design Elements

February 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 

shredded%2Bleaves.jpg
Hail damage on leaves

This garden series with Garden Designer Peter Nixon, is all about garden challenges thrown at us mostly by nature but also due to a situation in your garden that you might need to fix. 
Last week we covered hail damage, sun scorch, garden loopers, and a few other odds and sods that aren’t necessarily damage but a garden challenge all the same.
Today’s garden challenge is impact damage also from hail, but we’re delving more into what you should do with different plants that have been affected.

If you come home to find most of your garden covered in leaves because of a recent storm, wind, hail or something else, don't rake it up and dispose of it, but use it as a surface mulch.

hail%2Bdamage%2Bon%2Bstems.jpg
Hail damage on stems

Just make sure the leaves are bunched up against the trunks and stems of plants, otherwise you'll have problems with collar rot or other fungal problems.

Don't dig it in because it's green and will draw down nitrogen from the soil.

Quite often the stems are also impacted so the cambium is stripped off leaving only the heartwood.

It it's only a young plant, then it's best to dig it out because the plant has become to weakened.
If the canopy and branches aren't too badly stripped off, then cut back the ragged ends of the stems as soon as possible.
If you have any questions about hail damage in your garden, write in and let us know what happened our email address, or just post it realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Chervil in cooking in Spice It Up

February 19th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

 

spring-herbs-chervil-380.jpg
Chervil leaf

CHERVIL
This fine delicate herb is not grown as much these days even though it’s been grown as a herb for over 2,000 years!
Although I’m pretty sure that fine restaurants are serving it up as something special, most likely as microgreens.
Belonging in the carrot family, the fine leaves almost do look like carrot tops.

Sometimes sold  as "Fine" (pronounced feen) herbs which is a combination of parsley, tarragon chervil and occasionally a small amount of marjoram.

Definitely lovely on fish dishes, sauces, especially Béarnaise sauce and soups.

Let’s find out about how to use this lovely herb…I'm talking with herb expert Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

 



Chervil_BrusselsWinter.jpg
Chervil in the home garden photo M Cannon



Growing Chervil
If you want to grow your own Chervil here are some tips.
The seeds are slow to germinate, but here’s a tip:- The night before sowing, pour boiling water over seeds and leave to soak overnight. 
Chervil seeds also need light to germinate so don’t bury them with too much soil or potting mix. 
Germination usually occurs in 2-3 weeks but can take longer. 
Sow your Chervil seeds only about 5mm deep and thin plants to 30cm apart. 
Chervil will grow in any soil but dislikes being too wet although it does need water, but it won’t like being in badly drained soil. 
Tip: Best sown in situ as seedlings don’t transplant well and they sometimes bolt when transplanted. A bit like Coriander.
Definitely worth growing even just to try it.
If you're interested in making Chervil soup, try hunting down books by Rosemary Hemphill either "Herbs for All Seasons," or "Fragrance and Flavour," to get the specific recipe that Ian mentions.
If you have any questions about growing Chervil or any other herb, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Alstroemeria is Plant of the Week

February 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Alstroemeria Hybrids

The flowers of this next plant (Alstroemeria) is symbolic of wealth, prosperity and fortune.

It’s also the flower of friendship.

Some of the flowers of these new varieties of Peruvian lilies almost look like orchid flowers with an amazing variation in colour, and flecking.

Let’s find out more.

1-NOR_5001.JPG
Alstroemeria "Inca"  photo M Cannon

I'm talking with the Plant Panel: Karen Smith www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

PLAY: Alstromeria_10th February_2016

In Australia there are two types of Alstroemeria.

There are those that grow tall and flop all over the place.

These tall ones grow quite rampant and have some have become quite weedy.

You'll find them in older neglected gardens.

The best ones to grow are the dwarf varieties of Alstroemerias such asPrincess Lilies and Inca.

About ten years ago Könst Alstroemeria in Germany, started to develop  low growing garden varieties.

In the beginning it were taller varieties that reached up to 50-60 cm in the garden, but the last couple of years the new varieties have become shorter with more or bigger flowers.

Very suitable as balcony or terrace plants on pots.

1-NOR_5003.JPG
Alstroemeria or Peruvian Lilies  photo M Cannon

If treated well Inca alstroemeria varieties can flower from November to April!

These plants are really compact and make a neat mound over a pot but the best thing is that they flower continuously from spring to late autumn

 I have some flowering in pots on stone steps in the garden.

In winter I move them into a sunny spot but in summer they don’t like being blasted by the hot summer sun, so I move them to the other side of the stone steps, where it’s shaded by a building.

There’s no reason why they can’t be grown along a border instead of having annuals.

There spread fairly slowly and I would say that the height of this plant is about 25  - 30 cm and about 40 cms wide in a garden

They actually like good even when not in flowers as Princess Lilies make  a strong neat compact mound of leaves.

Alstroemeria are great as a cut flower lasting 2 weeks in the vase.

Sometimes also called Lily of the Incas or Parrot Lily Alstroemeria is a South American genus of about 50 species of flowering plants, mainly from the cool, mountainous regions in the Andes

Something we didn’t mention is that Alstroemeria is named after the Swedish botanist Klaus von Alstroemer, who was a pupil of the great botanical classifier Linnaeus. If you have any questions about growing Alstroemeria or have some information to share, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Garden Challenges Series, Hail Damage in Design Elements

February 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.comREALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Hail%2Bdamage%2B3.jpeg
Hail Damage is slight on these Bromeliads photo Peter Nixon

This garden series with Garden Designer Peter Nixon, is all about garden challenges thrown at us mostly by nature but also due to a situation in your garden that you might need to fix. 
Over the next few weeks we’ll be covering hail damage, sun scorch, garden loopers, and a few other odds and sods that aren’t necessarily damage but a garden challenge all the same.
Let’s kick off the series with the first challenge.

Hail damage on Alcantarea photo Peter Nixon
 I'm talking with Peter Nixon, garden designer

Summer hail storms can be especially discouraging to gardeners since they always seem to hit just as your plants are starting to look promising.
Even small 'pea sized' hail can severely damage crops and gardens because they hit the plants with so much force.

1-HOM_5022.JPG

 

There are ways to help your garden recover even if leaves are shredded and stems are broken on your favourite fruit and vegetables, or ornamental plants.
Give your plants a week to show recovery. 
But if they're continuing to wilt, go ahead and dig them up.

 



Hail%2Bdamage%2B1.jpeg
Shredded Alcantareas photo Peter Nixon



For Bromeliads don't rush out there with the secateurs to cut off the damaged and split leaves. Let the plant recover for a short time, preferable until new pups turn up then you can cut off the damaged leaves.

If you have any questions about hail damage in your garden, write in and let us know what happened our email address, or just post it to realworldgardener@gmail.com

.

 

 

 

 

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Brahminy Kite in Wildlife in Focus

February 12th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Brahminy Kite

Not all birds come into our gardens not because us gardeners haven’t planted the right amount of trees, shrubs and groundcovers, but because they’re just not into gardens.
Birds of prey or raptors are one such bird that will most likely never visit, unless you’re a wildlife carer and happen to be looking after one.

Brahminy-Kite.jpg

The Brahminy kite is a medium sized bird of prey with a white head and rest of body, being chestnut brown.

There are also black fingers that extend from the wings that are very distinctive when it's flying overhead.
Let’s find out about one of the smaller raptors of Australia. I'm talking with Dr Holly Parsons, manager of Birds in Backyards

Keep reading →

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Pomegranate is Plant of the Week

February 5th, 2016

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK.

Pomegrante: Punica grantumThese exotic fruits are filled with sweet, crunchy jewels of tangy deliciousness that give your food a real pop 

Only growing to anywhere between 1 and 5 metres depending on the type you get, it’s a tree that should be grown more in the home garden.

pomegranate%2Btree.jpg
Pomegranate tree

Let’s find out more. I'm talking with Jeremy Critchley, owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

Tart, citrusy and incredibly juicy, pomegranate seeds have suddenly become hip again, and have appeared in dishes and desserts from Masterchef to 5 star restaurants.

They grow in most climates throughout Australia, but don’t like extreme cold.

Pomegranates have attractive glossy green leaves, and like to be pruned - remove the current year’s growth in late winter to promote dense growth.

pomegranate%2Bflower.png

 

The plants produce reddish to light orange, crinkly 8-petalled flowers from late spring to late summer. These are followed by the most extraordinary coloured and shaped fruit which look like a cricket ball of a certain colour.

The  fruit starts small and grows to the size of a tennis ball and should start appearing from the third to fifth year of growth.

The Pomegranate is deciduous or semi-deciduous depending on its

location.

Although the Pomegranate is drought tolerant, to get good sized fruit, you need to water it as much as you would a Citrus tree in summer.

Pomegranates can be propagated from seed sown in spring or from cuttings taken between spring and autumn.

In the autumn split open the fruit to find rows of red seeds, eat the red flesh surrounding these, but spit the seeds out. It's a little bit complicated, but the fruit is truly delicious.

pomegrante%2Bfruit.jpgHow to eat a pomegranate !

To get those delicious arils out of the pomegranate here’s what you do.
First cut the pomegranate in half.
Holding it seeds-down over a bowl, massage and squeeze the shell a bit with your fingers, to soften it and loosen the arils. Whack the back of it with a rolling pin or a wooden spoon, and they’ll fall straight out into the bowl. Keep squeezing and whacking until the shell is empty. Watch your fingers!
Pick out any white bits of pith you can see, and you're good to go.

 

00:0000:00

- Older Posts »