Real World Gardener Bambino Bougainvilleas are Plant of the Week

November 26th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Bambino Bougainvilleas

The original species of Bougainvillea vine comes from South America and can grow quite huge.

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photo. Margot Anderson

The actual flower of the plant is small and generally white, but each cluster of three flowers is surrounded by three or six papery bracts with bright colours gardeners and plant lovers  know and love about this plant, including pink, magenta, purple, red, orange, white, or yellow.

Too big for balcony gardeners or courtyard gardens, there is an alternative for lovers of these show vines.

Listen to the podcast. I'm talking with Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremey Critchley, owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

Bouganvillea%2Bflowers1.jpgIf you like the gaudy show stopping colours of Bougainvilleas but can’t have one of those big ones in your garden, then the next best option is one of those baby Boges.

Similar flowers but a much neater and more contained habit.

Bougainvilleas will drop their leaves in dry times or if they receive too much watering.

You need to experiment with what works best for your plant.

Prune off any suckering canes that come from the base to keep the natural shape of your Bougainvillea.

Did you know that Bambinos Boges came from an intensive breeding program by Jan and Peter Iredell of Bougainvillea Nursery in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia?

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Over the last 40 years the Iredells have been collecting Bougainvillea cultivars from all over the world and through selective breeding they came up with the Bambino® family.

This just goes to show that Bougainvilleas are truly suited to most of Australia's climate.

These are the truest dwarf Bougainvilleas available.

The Bambino Boges will do well in container planting for many years to come but if you try to grow a large cane Bougainvillea in a pot, expect around a maximum of 6 years life before you need to purchase another one.

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Real World Gardener Trees Selection part 2 in Design Elements

November 26th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Selection of Trees.

Continuing the series on the stewardship and management of trees.

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This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.

Perhaps some people are put off trees because they can drop heaps of leaves and sometimes a branch or two, or fall over in storms.

But there’s a reason for that.

For the trees in a landscape to grow, thrive and survive the test of time, many factors need to be considered when you are choosing the trees for your garden.  

From the outset this plant selection is really the most important factor - To make this decision you need to think about a range of factors - tree size, habit, maintenance, deciduous or evergreen, flowers or fruit and lifespan.

Listen to the podcast to find out which tree you should choose for your garden. I'm talking with arboriculture consultant and landscape designer, Glenice Buck. www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

 Deciduous or Evergreen?

All trees will have some leaf drop throughout the year however overall deciduous trees will require more leaf raking than evergreens. 

Do you need more sun in the area throughout winter but shade in the summer? Deciduous trees are perfect to act as natural sun umbrellas for summer shade and winter sun.

Evergreen trees may not have the definite seasonal leaf drop like deciduous trees but they will naturally drop smaller amounts of dead leaves throughout the year.

In times of high  or extreme temperatures or after a storm a large amount of leaf drop is likely to happen and you could be collecting several cubic metres of leaves.

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There are many beautiful tree species which are valid additions to a garden but they may be short-lived. The expected life span of the tree will allow you to design and manage your garden appropriately.

Research shows that people experience more deaths from heart disease and respiratory diseases in urban areas where the tree had been removed than from those urban areas where trees were still allowed to grow

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Real World Gardener Controlling Snails in Plant Doctor

November 26th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT DOCTOR

Some pests in the garden love wet weather and seem to multiply overnight, munching their way through your vegie patch, herb garden and ornamental plants.
You know they’ve been there because of the silvery trails on garden paths and up the sides of pots.
If the day warms up quite a bit the trails dry to leave this glistening effect which can be confusing if you don’t know what causes it.

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Predator of snails and slugs in your garden are worth having.

Listen to the podcast, I'm talking with Steve Falcioni, general Manager www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au 

PLAY: Snails_25th November_2015
There’s big snails, small snails, but generally no non- native snail is going to do any good to your garden.
Unless of course you have their predators living in your garden like an army of ducks, one or two blue tongue lizards or perhaps some larger skinks.
If you have none of the above, then you need to try another method of getting rid of them and it’s best to use something that’s safe for children and pets.

snails.pngSnail pellets that contain Metaldehyde are poisonous to mammals, so does pose a threat to pets if used in the garden.

If pets ingest enough of it, it can be fatal; that is about a tablespoon's worth for your average dog and a teaspoon's worth for your cat.

Pet poisoning is usually due to the pet gaining access to the packet from say an unlocked garden shed, or from leaving piles of pellets rather than scattering them.

Pets are not always deterred from eating those pellets even with the addition of Bittrex, a bittering agent,so if in doubt, leave this one out.

Secondary poisoning to native wildlife is also possible from lizards, birds etc., consuming prey that have ingested the snail bait.

Sprinkling sawdust, lime, dolomite or coffee grounds around vulnerable plants is one way of controlling snails and slugs, but needs to be kept dry.

Not much use if you need to water your vegetables.
Snail traps consisting of beer are a good solution in the vegie garden.

 

1-bar-sided%2Bskink_on_rock.jpg
Bar-sided skinks love snails.

By far the best method is to attract native wildlife into your garden with dense planting, and places for lizards, and skinks to hide so that they can come out and devour those pesky snails.
 
If you have any questions about snails or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Passionfruit Splash is Plant of the Week

November 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

PASSIONFRUIT Passiflora edulis

passion-fruit-flower.jpgThis next vining plant could almost be a vegetable hero, because even though it has fruit, technically pumpkins are a fruit as well.
The foliage is very tropical looking and the flowers are an artwork in themselves. 

A botanical description of the flower goes something like this: A single, fragrant flower,5 cm wide, at each node on the new growth, 5 white petals and a fringe like corona of straight, white-tipped rays, rich purple at the base. It also has 5 stamens with large anthers, the ovary and triple-branched style forming a prominent central structure!On the downside, vine though almost has as many questions about it as does citrus trees and gardenias when it comes to talkback radio.
Listen to the podcast. I'm talking with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

DSC_2587.JPGAlmost every garden has space for one passionfruit vine, so try to find a suitable spot against a sunny fence or wall. 

Passionfruit Splash is not a grafted variety so you won't get the suckering of other varieties. Passionfruit Splash is a heavy cropper and suitable for cold climates with minimal protection when still young.

Available from www.transplants.com.au

Same things apply as with other Passionfruits.

DSC_2588.JPG It’s frustrating though when your neighbour’s passionfruit vine is thriving and yours is doing poorly.
Worse still, you don’t have any fruit or they keep dropping when they’re still green.
Passionfruit can be like that, so make sure you’re adding plenty of potassium in the form of potash and keep up the watering. 

One thing to remember is that Passionfruit vines don’t flower and fruit straightaway. 

In the subtropics they may begin fruiting in six to 12 months from planting, but in most parts of temperate Australia it takes 18 months before flowering begins and fruit forms.

Dig in some organic chook poo pellets before planting,and also sprinkle the soil with 0.5 kg dolomite, and mulch with an organic mulch once the vine’s in place.

All passionfruit like full sun and protection from wind.

You only need two wires along a north facing fence. 

One placed near the top of the fence and another one 50 cm lower.

Passiflora coccinea( Red passion flower) is a fast-growing vine, with edible passion fruits.

Red Passion Flower is an evergreen, flowering vine from South America that climbs by tendrils like all passionfruit vines.

The flower of Passiflora coccinea is a spectacular scarlet to deep orange color and generally reaches a width of 7-10 cm.

Each unique flower lasts about one day appearing in the summer and early autumn. 

The evergreen leaves are obovate in shape and have doubly serrate margins. Fruits of Red Passion Flower are ovoid, orange or yellow in color, and are mottled green.

If you have any questions about growing passionfruit of any variety why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

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Real World Gardener Trees Series part 1 in Design Elements

November 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Trees have a valuable role to play in our immediate environment and also to our native wildlife.
A lot of gardeners really care for their trees when it comes to fertilizing and maintenance but when it comes to tree maintenance such as pruning, it’s not that straight forward.
So you have a tree that needs lopping or even a tree that you want cut down.
Who should you call? Not Joe the lawnmower man or No Name Garden Maintenance.
You need to call a professional, but there is a distinct difference between these tree professionals and you need to know what they are?
This series is about arboriculture and managing trees.
Let’s find out who to call by listening to the podcast.

PLAY: Arborist definition_18th November 2015

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Want to know what exactly is the industry of Arboriculture?

 As a quick definition, Arboriculture involves the selection, planting and care of trees – an Arborist is somebody who maintains and or manages this process.  It is a very broad field which has many areas of specialization. 

-          Arborists may do the manual pruning and care on trees. 

-          Other arborists may do the specialised scientific studies and research for government departments, botanic gardens and CSIRO etc

-          There are the arborists who specialise in forestry, timber production and growing plantations. 

-          Then there are the consultant arborists who provide technical expertise in managing trees usually in an urban environment.  

People either love or hate trees, but trees have so many positive benefits.
Tree will clear air-they’re the lungs of the planet.
If you have any questions about tree maintenance or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Early Australians 19th Century Drinks in What’s Cooking

November 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

WHAT'S COOKING

Would you drink a shrub?

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19th Century Kitchens

No, it’s not a plant that you have to liquidise but it’s a term to describe a type of drink that for some reason fell out of usage both here and in England, but remained in use in America.

Where does the drink shrub stem from?

So wine was considered socially acceptable to drink but not spirits like whisky and brandy.

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Wine grapes were planted in Australia as early as 1788

However, cider was being made in the colony as early as 1803.

Peach cider though was more common than apple cider, just because peaches were plentiful.

Fruit was left to ferment and some old properties in Australia still have a cider press.

Most of the soft drinks that you see today came from the recipes in the kitchens of the 1800's.

But if you belonged to the temperance movement you would be drinking various cordials, barley water and shrubs, but perhaps not the apple and peach ciders.

Amongst the cordials were elderberry cordials, and raspberry vinegar cordial.

To make Raspberry Vinegar cordial you step the raspberries in cider vinegar for a few day and then add enough sugar to temper the acidic flavour.

All that's left to do now is to bottle it and over 8 - 12 months the vinegar tempers quite a bit.

This was used as a cordial base for children's drinks.

If you have any questions about drinks from old or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Groundcover Bamboos are Plant of the Week

November 12th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Groundcover Bamboo

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Bamboo comes from all over the world; from South America, Africa, Asia, Australia. It may surprise you to learn that Australia's got four native species of bamboos. 
Have you had a bad experience with growing bamboo?
Perhaps there were invasive bamboo runners coming up through the fence from next door?
You might be surprised to learn that not all running bamboo is bad, but it’s good to know the difference between running and clumping bamboo.
Let’s find out about them by listening to the podcast. I'm talking with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremey Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

Ground cover bamboos are a spreading variety of bamboo, almost like lawns and can be contained with a simple root barrier.

Karen mentioned Dwarf Whitestripe Pleioblastus fortune-is the prettiest of the ground covers, with crisp green and white variegated foliage.

This one grows to 40cm in height and will flush back denser and fresher when trimmed down regularly as recommended.

A tip about bamboo; when planting bamboo in the ground, whether it’s clumping or running types, it's important to know how they’ll behave.

Cultivate the entire area you want covered to a depth of  approximately 15cm.

plant-1-baby-panda.jpgOr, bring in top soil to a depth of 15cm.

Add mushroom compost through the top soil and plant at 50cm spacings apart in a gridlike fashion or closer for quicker results.

If planting in pots, use a good quality potting mix with added coir peat.

Mainly so that they survive and also so that they don't take over.

Bamboo "Baby Panda" has lime green very dense foliage and only grows to 20cm in full sun.

In a part shade position Jeremey says it can get to 30 - 40 cm.

Baby Panda bamboo is frost tolerant.

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Real World Gardener Best Fit Gardening and LivingFences in Design Elements

November 12th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Continuing with the series on best fit gardening. Living Fences

Conifers make great living hedges but may not suit your district.

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1-COS_1805.JPGFences make good barriers between neighbours and for keeping out undesirable animals but what if you don’t want a hard fence?

A Living Fence is a fence made of living trees and shrubs either made from thorny or non-thorny plants.

It can also be called a green fence, or hedge.

Will a living fence work and what would you grow in your district?

Let’s find out by listening to the podcast. I'm talking with Garden Designer Peter Nixon www.peternixon.com.au

 

PLAY: Best Fit Gardeningliving fences_11th November_2015

Your living fence can act as a better windbreak that that solid paling fence, plus it also creates a home for beneficial insects.

Peter mentioned Grewia occidentalis ‘Lavender Star or South African Crossberry; Solandra longiflora or dwarf Hawaiian Chalice; Choisya ternata or Orange Blossom and of course rose bushes for cool districts.

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Real World Gardener Test Your Soil on Soil Savvy

November 12th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SOIL SAVVY

If you want a lush garden where everything grows wonderfully like in this photo, you need to know what type of garden soil you have in your back yard.

1-greenhouse.jpgHow well do you know your soil in the backyard?

No matter how much work you do in your garden, all that careful sowing, weeding and tending could be in vain if the quality of your soil isn’t up to scratch or you’ve been planting things which aren’t suited to your soil.

We gardeners all know that the soil gives your plants vital nutrients, water and air that they need for healthy, but each plot of ground has its own blend of minerals, organic and inorganic matter which largely determines what crops, shrubs or trees can be grown successfully.

Listen to the podcast to find out how to go about knowing your soil type . I'm talking with Horticultural Scientist Penny Smith. Penny specialises in soil science.

There are six main soil groups: clay, sandy, silty, peaty, chalky and loamy.

There’s even soil types which are combinations of the main types; sandy clay, clayey sand.

They each have different properties and knowing what type you have lets you make the best choices and get the most from your garden.

PENNY'S TEXTURE TEST

Screen-Shot-soil%2Btesting.pngGrab a small handful of your garden soil and make a fat worm with your soil.

Put your thumb into the top of your soil worm and squish it out.

If you soil is sandy the bit that you squeeze out will fall apart; if it's clay soil it will stick together reasonably well with some cracking.

Loamy soil will stick together but won't dirty your hand as much as the clay soil and there should be no cracking.

Remember, soil types can vary from suburb to suburb or even street to street, so don’t always rely on what someone tells you.

If you’re still not sure after doing Penny’s soil test, take a sample of your garden soil to your garden centre.

If you have any questions about finding out your soil type or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Delphinium Gaurdians are Plant of the Week

November 8th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 

1-DSC_2540.JPGDelphinium "Guardian"
 These mid-sized plants are the stars of the early summer border.

The plants form a low mound of deeply-cut green leaves, and have these amazing tall spikes of satiny flowers.

The original version have enormous  spikes of up to 2 1/2 metres and needed 'vernalisation."

But not D. Gaurdian which grows to around 1 metre tall with deep-blue petals and strong multi-branching stems that are great for cutting.

 

Let’s find out about them.

I'm talking with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallerycom.au

Special Tips for Delphinium Plants
in the past, the 'old school' Delphiums required their roots to be kept cool, but not these new varieties because their foliage is quite large and as they're usually in the back of the flower border, or where the roots are shaded by other plants.

Removing faded spikes at the base will encourage repeat flowering spikes throughout Summer and into Autumn.

This new branching variety of Delphiums should flavour in your garden beds for at least several months.

When all flowering is finished, remove the last of the dead spikes and water them well after fertilising.

 
 They main thing you have to watch out for in hot, humid summer regions, is that plants are often attacked by mildew in mid-summer; to fix that just cut back the foliage quite hard to encourage fresh new growth.
In these regions plants don’t usually last more than 2 to 3 years. 
Once established, they have low water and maintenance requirements although they will shutdown on days when temperatures are over 30 degrees C in attempt to cool themselves.
 If you have any questions about growing Delphiniums of any variety why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

 

 

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