Real World Gardener Salvia Go Go is Plant of the Week

October 23rd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

SALVIA GO GO
Covering more than 900 species, Salvia is the largest genus in the mint family (Laminaceae.)

salvia%2Bgo%2Bgo%2Bin%2Ba%2Bpot.pngYou don’t need to know much to grow these next plants because they’re pretty simple and easy to grow.

Not only that, they’re hardy and frost tolerant, plus they flower for months and months.
If a bit snaps off, you can stick it into the ground and grow a whole new plant, it’s that easy.

Let’s find out about them. I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

Large or small, grown as annuals or perennials, it creates an impact.

And there is a salvia for every climate in Australia.

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This is what the breeder said about Salvia Go Go.

GoGos bring according to Kientzler a multitude of bright flower spikes all summer long, and quickly develop into quite impressive specimens – up to 120 cm in height and width, emanating an aura of luminescence and all-season splendour.

“Spectacular in large, decorative containers, either in full sun or partial shade.”

 

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Salvias vary in height from about 30cm high,  to large shrubs that are up to 3m tall and wide.

Flowers are arranged in spires and come in hues of blue, purple, cerise, red, pink, white, yellow and orange. Most are at their best from spring to early winter, but there are salvias that flower almost year-round if you want that sort of thing not to mention the ones with scented leaves like pineapple sage, fruit salad sage, or just plain culinary sage.
Team up your Salvias with some silver leaved plants, some Diascias (dutchman’s britches) or Angelonia, all of which have been featured in this segment.

 

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Real World Gardener Best Fit Gardening Lawn Alternatives in Design Elements

October 23rd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Continuing with the series on best fit gardening. 
Today we’re looking at lawn solutions when you can't have a lawn like this one.1-BOD_1596.JPG

Do you have a bare patch of lawn where no matter how many times you replace it with turf, it just refuses to grow?
Perhaps it gets too much shade in winter for the grass to survive or there’s root competition from the lovely shade giving tree?
Wouldn’t you like a grass alternative that Bambi would love to lie on to have a sleep?
Sounds too good to be true but there are solutions to the problem.
Let’s find out. I'm talking with garden designer Peter Nixon of www.paradisusgl.peternixon.com.au

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Zoysia tenuifolia

Peter mentioned these lawn alternatives:Mini mondo, Dichondra, Zoysia tenuifolia or Korean Temple grass.
Just a little note about Zoysia tenuifolia: Zoysia tenuifolia is very different from all other Zoysia grasses. 
Often referred to by different names including No-Mow Grass, Min Mow and Petting Grass, Zoysia tenuifolia is more of an ornamental style of grass and not suitable for use as a general lawn.
Instead it has a very fine bright green leaf, and if left to grow without lawn mowing I’ll develop a clumping characteristic where it will naturally raise higher in areas, but will never grow high like other grasses can.

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Real World Gardener Turmeric in Spice It Up

October 23rd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fmSydney,streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

SPICE IT UP

Turmeric: Curcuma longa

 In yet another example of what’s in the supermarket spice shelf is not what it’s cracked up to be, you’ll find out that there’s two types of this (Turmeric) spice.

One is best for pickling or making pickles with, the other is the better one for flavouring your cooking.

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When commercially harvesting or 'lifting' Turmeric, the rhizome is boiled to stop it from sprouting; to even out the colour, because naturally, the colour is concentrated in the centre and a lot paler towards the edges; and to gelatinise the starches within it.

 

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Even more interesting is that you can actually grow this spice yourself.

Listen to the podcast. Talking with herb expert Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

Turmeric is a tropical rhizome but can grow in cooler climates as long is you give it protection from frost.

Sometimes referred to as Indian Saffron, but there's no real similarity with the flavour.

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Madras Turmeric and Allepeppy turmeric were the two different types that Ian mentioned.

Madras is for colouring food such as when making pickles and Allepeppy is the more aromatic turmeric that you use in cooking dishes such as Dahl, or curries or wherever the recipe calls for Turmeric.

If you manage to get some rhizomes of Turmeric, spring is the time to plant them in the ground about 7 – 10 cm deep.

Use the Turmeric root fresh by grating it into your dishes that call for Turmeric.

If you have any questions about Turmeric or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Teucrium fruitcans is Plant of the Week

October 16th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Members of the genus that is featured today in plant of the week are commonly known as germanders.
There are hundreds of species, including herbs, shrubs or subshrubs.
They’re found all over the world but are most common in Mediterranean climates which might make you think that they are tough little plants.
You would be right.
Let’s find out about them with the plant panel, Karen Smith www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

by listening to the podcast 

The idea that Teucrium was named after the King of Troy sounds fantastic, but in reality it’s more likely that Linnaeus named the genus after a Dr. Teucer, a medical botanist.
The species Teucrium fruitcans grows to 1-8m x 1.8 m.

Ornamental, silvery foliage year round.

Deep, true blue flowers from autumn through to late spring.

Very hardy and dry tolerant shrub once established.

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Suitable for clipping  and for hedging.

Prefers a full sun location in most soil types given good drainage. Withstands dry conditions well once established but should be watered deeply occasionally during extended periods of heat. A hard prune after flowering will encourage a dense habit. If hedging, lighter but more frequent prunes to shape is required.

Teucrium fruiticans "silver Box" is a new release only growing to 0.8 m x 0.8 m.

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Why it’s called Germander?
Taken from medieval Latin germandra, based on the Greek khamaidrus, literally ‘ground oak’, from khamai ‘on the ground’ + drus ‘oak’ (because the leaves of some species were thought to look like those of the oak).

If you have any questions about growing Germander or Teucrium, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

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Real World Gardener Best Fit Gardening and Weed Suprression in Design Elements

October 16th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

This series on best fit gardening is coming up with solutions for those difficult situations in your garden that seem almost impossible to solve.

If you can't have a garden like this one because of the location and soil at your place.

Try for something that best fits the situation.

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Areas that receive hot baking sun in summer and shade in winter will always prove a challenge and sometimes end up being a haven for weeds.
This week's challenge was an east facing clay bank between mature eucalypts with a Tradescantia problem
Yes, the weeds that seem to creep up on you when you’re not watching, almost overnight.
So what can be done if you want weed suppression?
Find out more by listening to the podcast.

Planting suggestions were:

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Kalanchoe fedtchenkoi variegata

 Kalanchoe fedtchenkoi variegate-Lavender Scallops, for sub-tropical to warm temperate districts.

 

Cyanotis foecunda-south African Pussy Ears for warm temperate to cool temperate.

Has striking silver foliage.

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Cyanotis foecunda

Ceratostigma willmottianum-Willmotts Blue or Chinese Plumbago:For cool temperate areas.

 

Tradescantia is now the politically correct name for what we once called Wandering Jew.
It’s particularly good to get rid of this weed because it seems to harbor so many things that make our pets itch and us sneeze.
Spraying might seem the easy option, but those waxy leaves and stems seem impervious to weed killer.
Wear gloves and try and rake up as much as possible to get on top of it, then closely monitor the patch for any more outbreaks.

 

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Real World Gardener Clean Gardening Practises on Soil Savvy

October 16th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SOIL SAVVY

Wouldn't you like a garden this this one; thriving, lush and disease free?

So nice you could hold a tea party.

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Sometimes our garden plants go along for years then all of a sudden, they drop dead and we’re left wondering why?
The answer can lie in a number of different factors and a slip in hygiene practises in the garden sometimes has a role to play in the demise of your plant.
So what does that mean for us gardeners?
Let’s find out by listening to the podcast with Soil Scientist Penny Smith

You soil is a living eco-system so don't go pouring anti-fungal drenches on your soil or you will end up with no micro-organisms.

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Spray tools with methylated spirits and water solution

Hygiene practises in the garden is more than just keeping your garden tidy.
Pathogens can lie dormant for many years, just waiting for the right conditions.
Good garden hygiene, is sometimes referred to as “clean gardening practices”, will help to prevent the build up of pathogens and pests.
Make their life short in your garden by following best hygiene practises.

Secateurs can spread fungal problems, so clean tools between plants.

In fact after the jobs done, spray all the tools that you have used with a 70% methylated spirits and 30% water solution. Keep the solution in a labelled spray bottle where you keep your garden tools.

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Disease-spreading organisms can, and will, be carried from plant to plant by using contaminated pots, trays, soil, tools and even our hands if proper precautions are not taken. 
Pots, seed trays and propagating tools should be kept scrupulously clean on an ongoing basis. 
Growing containers should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected before each replanting. They can be scrubbed and cleaned using water and a natural detergent and then disinfected by soaking in a 10% bleach solution before being rinsed with clear water and allowed to dry. 
Better yet, a quality garden disinfectant may be used for this purpose. Cutting and digging tools, including hands, should also be washed and disinfected after each use

If you have any questions about hygiene practises in the garden or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville

NSW 1675

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Real World Gardener Correa Ring a Ding is Plant of the Week

October 9th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT OF THE WEEK

The exotic Fuchsia plant has very attractive delicate flowers and perhaps the native version isn’t quite so showy.

On the plus side, native fuchsias or Correas are much more hardy and won’t die on you after a season or two because you’ve either overwatered or underwatered it.

Correa belongs to the family Rutaceae, along with Australian native plantsBoronia and Philotheca.

The name Correa is taken from José Francisco Correa de Serra, a Portuguese botanist. 

 
They are mainly prostrate to small or medium shrubs, growing to a height of plus or minus approximately 2 metres as a general guide with a similar spread.

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Correa baeuerlenii

Karen recommends Correa baeuerlenii, Chef's Hat Correa and Correa glabra for hardy garden situations.
Correa Ring a Ding is one of the latest cultivars to be released.

 

 

Coreas can be grown in most soil types in sun or part shade.

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Correa Ring a Ding

Good drainage is important however, and raised beds are suggested for heavy soil conditions.
Once established, plants flower from early autumn to late spring.

Most plants could sprawl but giving it a light prune can give you  a more compact shape.

However, correas can be hard pruned but I prefer a little and often.

The more your lightly prune the more flower you will get.

Flowers have four petals usually fused into a pendulous bell.

Eventually this flower can split at its end point and reflex adding to variety and intrigue.

Six to eight stamens can extend a little beyond the calyx tube with pollen-presenters most evident. 
 

If you have any questions about growing Correas, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com

 

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Real World Gardener Best Fit Gardening and Hiding Boundary Fences in Design Elements

October 9th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

DESIGN ELEMENTS



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Manettia bicolour
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Senecio mikanoides

Talking with Garden Designer Peter Nixon from Paradisus

 

Last week we started a series on best fit planting for various scenarios in many people’s gardens.
Best fit planting means that your being careful with your selection of plant so that it actually lasts in that spot.

Unless of course you decide you don’t like it, but otherwise, if you choose for the conditions that it’s going to grow in, then your plant should thrive.
The first scenario was how to hide a boundary fence in a narrow passageway at one side of the house.
After all, if you’re looking out the window at that fence, it’s not that attractive.
Much better to have some sort of green plant giving off a sense of peace and tranquillity than a brown either paling or Colourbond fence.

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Stephanotis floribunda



Peter mentioned Senecio mikanoides and Manettia bicolour as two possible climbing plants for the narrow passageway.
Other climbing plant suggestions apart from the Meuhlenbeckia, are Star Jasmine, Hoya carnosa, Mandevilla Aloha series and Pandorea Snow Bells and Stephanotis floribunda.
These are all evergreen and should fit that narrow passageway as well.
If you have any questions about hiding the boundary fence or have a suggestion why not write in or email me atwww.realworldgardener.com

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Real World Gardener Controlling Black Spot on Roses in Plant Doctor

October 9th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT DOCTOR

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We love our roses don’t we?

What’s not to like? 
Just inhale the perfume, and feast your eyes on the shape and form of the flower and the whole gorgeousness of a bunch of roses.

On the other hand, there’s the thorns on most, the pruning and the dreaded diseases that they get if they’re not in the right environment.

So what can we do about the most common problem on roses?

 

Talking with eco Organic Garden General Manager, Steve Falcioni

 

 

 

 

Black spots have a soft edge and initially they're just black about the size of a pea.

As the fungus progresses the leaf yellows and then drops off.

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symptoms show up 3 to 10 days later of mild temperatures of around 24 degrees Centigrade and high humidity.

Usually black spot starts on the lower leaves and works its way up,

Sometimes it can defoliate the whole bush.

Even though you've sprayed your roses in winter to control fungal problems, fungal spores blow in on the wind from somewhere else.

Some of the cultural controls they you need to do before spraying are:-make sure your rose has 6 hours of direct sunlight and logs of good air movement.

Winter pruning should have opened up the bush as a way of reducing the humidity issue.

Also rose are heavy feeders so make sure your roses are well fed.

I hope this peaks your interest in getting out there and spraying those roses with whatever method of control you choose.
Starting early is a good way to get a jump on those fungal diseases before the weather warms up and the humidity increases.

Organic sprays include whole cream milk, but is only effective if sprayed on sunny days.

Bi-carb soda and horticultural oil.

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Potassium bicarbonate sold as eco Carb fro, www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Potassium bicarbonate changes the osmotic pressure on the leaf causing any fungal spores to burst.

While you’re out there, why not pick some roses for inside the house.
If you have any questions about your rose bushes or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Perennial Lobelia is Plant of the Week

October 2nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 PLANT OF THE WEEK

Talking with the Plant Panel; Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au

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Do you love blue flowers? If so you’ll love this next plant,

Lobelia spp.is usually sold as an attractive annual herb but there are new varieties that are biennial or even perennial.
Lobelia it’s an easy-to-grow, carefree plant that prefers cooler climates but grows all through the summertime.

Butterfly like blue flowers smother the plant for many months.

Flower colour is the brightest of brilliant blue.
It flowers so much it will be still going right through until the first frost. 
Did I mention that the flowers are really, really blue so let’s find out what it is…

Lobelia species are native to North America, South America and Southern Africa There are many selections of Lobelia erinus grown in gardens around the world and growing lobelia is an asset to the garden.
Lobelia erinus from which Lucia Dark Blue is bred and selected is South African in origin. 
'Lucia' Dark Blue

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Location is the key to success with Lobelias.
They need a well draining garden bed or container in full sun to part shade for some of the day.
Keep the soils evenly moist and mulch to conserve moisture and keep the soil cooler.
Once plants are established a regular but diluted liquid feeding programme every two weeks or so is beneficial.
Insect pests and other diseases are not a serious problem.
A light prune when plants are beginning to look a bit sad together with an application of a balanced fertilizer will promote new growth and another crop of flowers.

 

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