Real World Gardener Golden Penda is Plant of the Week

September 25th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Xanthostemon chrysantha, Golden Penda

golden%2Bpenda.pngTalking with the Plant Panel; Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au

Just imagine if you were looking at plants at a plant fair and you saw something that you were pretty sure had never been seen anywhere else before?

If you love yellow in the garden, especially yellow flowers, you’ll want this shrub.

The flowers have been described like a golden powderpuff, or like the flowers of a bottlebrush but round.

 

The leaves are in whorls around the stems.

The flowers are pretty showy so let’s find out what it is. 

Golden Penda is in the same family as all Lilly Pillies so the powderpuff like flowers are no surprise.

What is a surprise is that if you live in cool temperate climates, you can grow this tree indoors.

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No need to worry about it reaching for the roof because you can hard prune it every year to keep it bushy.

In a garden situation it only grows to 5m but more in it's natural habitat.

Golden Penda is a spectacular, medium to large rainforest tree with a dense, spreading crown of  dark green, glossy foliage and contrasting reddish new growth.

The bark is rough and scaly with showy, dense clusters of golden yellow, fluffy flowers on the ends of the branches during summer, autumn and winter. 

The flowers attract nectar feeding birds.
To grow Golden Penda, plant in any well drained soil and keep well watered. 

Prefers warm to hot conditions, but tolerates light frosts and subtropical climates.

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Real World Gardener Cleaning Your Tools in Tool Time

September 25th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

TOOL TIME

Talking with Tony Mattson, General Manager of www.cutabovetools.com.au

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What do you do at the end of a few hours’ worth or even a day’s worth of gardening?
Do you remember to put the tools away?
More importantly do you give your tools a wipe down to remove all the gum and gunk after pruning?
We gardeners sometimes overstretch ourselves when we’re out in the garden and some of those finishing tasks get neglected. Let’s see how we can fix all that on tool time.

Tool time covered sharpening secateurs in a previous segment and you can hear the podcast of that segment by putting in sharpening secateurs in the search bar on www.realworldgardener.com
Are you surprised about steel wool not being so good to use on the blades of your pruning tools?
Encouraging rust to grow is not what we want at all so those soft brass brushes are the ticket for giving your secateurs a good clean.
Now that they’re nice and sharp let’s resolve to keep them nice and clean each time we use those pruning tools.
Then we coat the blades with some sort of machine oil based, such as sewing machine oil or even some olive oil.
The silicone based oils dry without leaving a coating so are not that protective of your gardening tools.
Apologies to all those conscientious gardeners, who have the energy to religiously clean first and then put their pruning tools away at the end of the day. 

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Real World Gardener Licorice in Cooking in Spice It Up

September 25th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

SPICE IT UP

Have you ever wondered where the confection licorice comes from?
Did you ever think that it came from a plant?
Perhaps from a plant’s leaves, the stem, the flower or the roots?
Does the name licorice make your mouth water thinking about the soft mostly sweet confection.

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Perhaps you think of your favourite, the Licorice Allsort.
Just imagine if you had a swag of recipes with licorice.
Would they belong in some dream world for the sweet of tooth?
But if manufacturers didn’t add all that sugar and flavour could you use licorice in savoury dishes?

Let's find out by listening to the podcast with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

 

 
Did it surprise you that Roman soldiers were chewing the dried licorice root all that time ago to give them endurance?

To make confectionary licorice, the licorice root is boiled to make a sort of molasses called Pontifract cakes which is very bitter and very strong.

Apparently you can buy Pontifract cakes in England!


Certainly if you chew the dried root, it’s definitely not the same experience as eating the confection but there is that definite licorice flavour.

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Dried licorice root is used to make a Chinese Master Stock.

To make this Master Stock, boil soy Sauce, water and sugar and boil for a few hours with Fennel, Star Anise, Chilli, Black Pepper and Licorice.

Powdered Licorice root can be used to make Licorice Ice-cream.

If you have a herb garden, why not give the licorice plant a go.

It certainly will do well in frost prone areas because it dies down over the winter months and re-shoots in Spring.

If you have any questions growing Glycorrhiza glabra or licorice plant, or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Part 4 of Designing A Garden in New York State in Design Elements

September 20th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 with Landscape Designer Glenice Buck

Over the last couple of weeks, we’ve been taken on a journey to just outside a little hamlet called Germantown, about 2 hours drive from New York City.

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photo Glenice Buck

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photo Glenice Buck

 We’resurrounded by mountains in the distance, and so far, the Northern Hemisphere trees have been identified with the help of a local arborist, and some shrewd detective work on Glenice’s part.

Listen to the podcast to find out what happens in the final of this series.


By now the veggie patch had been installed, a retaining wall and a new garden bed had been built.

Then it was buying the perennial plants; Rudibeckia, Hemerocallis, (Day Lilies), Mondardia ( Bee Balm), Agastache, Wormwood, Veronica, Salvias and Ornamental grasses.

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photo Glenice Buck

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photo Glenice Buck

The arborists will continue withy the selective clearing and maintenance.

Lastly, a native land steward will be employed to replant the native woodland in the south point of the garden.

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Real World Gardene Friendship Sage is Plant of the Week

September 20th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Talking with the Plant Panel; Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au

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Just imagine if you were looking at plants at a plant fair and you saw something that you were pretty sure had never been seen anywhere else before?

You certainly would have to know your plants, but that’s just what happened at a plant show in 2005 in Argentina.

It seems that (Friendship Sage) we must say thanks to Rolando Uria of the University of Buenos Aries for this very fine plant. Yes, at a plant fair, Rolando really know his Salvias and picked out that this plant was a truly unique hybrid sage.

Needless to say that it’s generated a great deal of excitement in the Salvia world.

The flowers are pretty showy so let’s find out what it is.

Salvia%2Bamistad.pngPLAY: Salvia Amistad_16th  September_2015

A medium size semi-shrubby perennial with fast growth in the warm seasons to reach 1.2m by at least as wide with glossy green deltoid shaped leaves that are textured in a way similar to Salvia guaranitica.

In Spring through to Autumn and the flowers or whorls of large rich royal purple flowers emerging from near black dark bracts.

Best grown in full to part sun along the coast or at least with protection from afternoon sun in warmer inland locations in a fast-draining soil with moderate to regular watering.

Ideal for pots or summer borders, this is a strong growing variety with stunningly beautiful flowers. Dark purple buds open to deep purple flowers with an almost black calyx. If you give it a light trim you’ll be rewarded with repeat flowering.

 

Salvia Amistad can take cold winters to -6 0 C, but because it’s always flowering, it’s worthwhile even if it only lasts the year.

 

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Real World Gardener Beneficial Insects for your garden in Plant Doctor

September 20th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au  and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

PLANT DOCTOR

In every garden lurks aphids, mealybugs, two spotted mites and other pests that prey on your vegetables and flowers.

What’s an organic gardener going to do ?

Is there someone to call? Certainly not ghostbusters!

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Forget nasty expensive chemicals that do harm to our bees and the good bugs in our garden.

Because that’s the answer, enlist the help of the good bugs but you may need to call them up with some help.

Q and A with Steve Falcioni from www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au


1-DSC_2146.JPGBeneficial insects need food, water and shelter to come into your garden.

Different stages of their life cycle require different foods.

For example, the adult Hoverfly and Lacewing feed on pollen and nectar but the larvea feeds on pest insects.

If pest numbers are low, larvae will also feed on pollen and nectar to get them through the lean times.

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Foods you should plant include plants from these families; Asteraceae or Daisy family, Apiaceae or Carrot family, Lamiaceae or Mint family.

The plant list includes all herbal plants and Mint, Lavender, Caraway Cosmos, Chrysanthemum, Alyssum, Queen Anne's Lace.

What these plants have in common is flower over a long period of time, the flower structure and a dense source food.
When you enlist the help of beneficial insects to your garden this is actually called biological control.

These insects are the natural enemies of garden pests and they can be an effective, non-toxic method for solving your garden pest problems.

Farmers used it in a system called integrated pest management or IPM.

Another reason to go natural and use beneficials, is that a greater number of insects are now showing resistance to chemical pesticides.

Funnily enough, no insects have shown immunity to being eaten

Plus, these insecticides have been shown to be harmful to bees as well as ourselves.

If you have any questions about identifying pests or beneficial insects, or have some information you’d like to share, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Bacopa is Plant of the Week

September 13th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Talking with the Plant Panel; Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au
These next plants are quite low growing but are the sort of plant that flower a lot and you can stuff here and there into rockeries and nooks and crannies in your garden, or if you like hanging baskets, they’ll trail over these.

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They have a bit of a strange name so I’m surprised that marketers haven’t coming up with something more inspiring.

The flowers are pretty showy though so let’s find out what it is.

Bacopa is an evergreen  mat forming plant that grows about 5 - 10 cm tall and has stems covered in bright green, simple leaves that are slightly thickened.

If you plant your Bacopa in the garden it will make nice mat or groundcover

Bacopa has a five-petaled flowers which small  but profuse.

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The colours vary from whites to pinks and mauves, depending on the variety.

Potted in planters, bacopa stems trail down over the container's edge and are especially attractive mixed with other plants in hanging baskets.

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Growers now plant them up in Trixies and Mixies where 3 plants are grown in the same plug.

 

 Where to plant your Bacopa

Bacopa does best in a spot that receives morning sun and some afternoon shade.

It can tolerate being in full sun throughout the day if kept well-watered, although summer heat and full sun can cause the plant to droop.

bacopa%2Btrixies%2Bin%2Bgreen%2Bpot.jpgThis plant needs regular watering, especially during the first few weeks after planting, and isn't tolerant of dry spells or drought. Adding a 5 cm layer of organic mulch around the

It turns out that Scopia is just a name for a series of 16 varieties of Bacopa.

 

Among them are the Gulliver varieties, which have very large flowers.

If you’re area’s climate is really warm, then Bacopa doesn’t like to grow there so much.

However Bacopa does grow well in dappled and semi-shade so there’s another choice for all those gardeners that either have different amounts of sun and shade in their garden where they need a plant that can cope with both.

 

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Real World Gardener Part 3 of Designing A Garden in New York State in Design Elements

September 13th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Talking with Landscape Designer Glenice Buck. Over the last couple of weeks, we’ve been taken on a journey to just outside a little hamlet called Germantown, about 2 and 1/2 hours drive from New York City.

We’re surrounded by mountains in the distance,the Catskill Mountains to the west and the Berkshire's Mountains to the east. So far, the Northern Hemisphere trees have been identified with the help of a local arborist, and some shrewd detective work on Glenice’s part.

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Central garden area. Photo Glenice Buck

The barn on the property is now the residence. Outside the back door of the barn there is a stone patio area then a grassed area with a few mature trees; two old Gleditsia, stone fruit, a Magnolia, Lilacsm Pin Oak, White Oak and Shaggy Barked Hickories.

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Looking towards the north point. Photo Glenice Buck

So what next in this design series?

After being there for a week, Glenice had a clear idea of how she wanted to define the areas and also the order in which these needed to be built.

By chance the property was in the shape of a boomerang which is quite serendipitous because it now is in the hands of Australians.

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Looking through the trees at the south point. Photo Glenice Buck

Nonetheless, there were still no requests for gum trees of banksias or wattles, but instead using the native vegetation and the idea of creating 3 zones.

Plus, all the things that a lot of gardeners really want, like the veggie garden, compost bin and play areas for the kids and if you have the space a fruit orchard.

They also wanted to attract bees, birds and butterflies to their garden. What real gardener doesn't?

Of the zones, the north point became the arboretum or orchard area and the south point became the woodland that surrounded the pond. Mulched pathways were introduced to lead you through the existing trees. Underplanting was with Trilliums, Toad Lilies, Brunnera, Ferns, Viola, Polygonatum and Pulmonaria.

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Real World Gardener Dwarf Melaleuca is Plant of the Week

September 7th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au


You don’t see too many Melaleuca's which are tough and hardy plants being promoted in nursery, garden centres or even gardening magazines.
Why then have they got this poor image?
Perhaps it’s the small narrow leaves that don’t have the visual impact of Grevilleas?
The flowers are pretty showy so let’s find out what it is.


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Melaleuca linarifolia - a large tree

Melaleuca linarifolia or “snow  is in Summer” Myrtaceae family along with Eucalypts of course.

This large tree is found naturally along the east coast of New South Wales and southern Queensland usually along watercourses and swamps.

The habitat ranges from heath and dry sclerophyll forest  to moist or swampy ground.

Known as Snow-in-Summer, or Narrow-leaved Paperbark, and naturally too big for most gardens.

Did you know that Melaleuca comes from the Greek melas meaning black and leukos meaning white, referring to black marks on the white trunks of some species due to fire.

Also the meaning of linariifolia is drawing a similiarity to leaves in the genus Linaria.

So what do you do if you like the flowers"

This is where the dwarf versions of Melaleuca linarifolia become interesting.

If you’re area’s climate is really dry, then Melaleuca’s will still grow there, but they won’t grow so well.
That’s because Melaleucas are much better when the soil is boggy, or swampy, or has temporary inundation.
They also won’t go to well if there’s root competition from other trees because that will make the ground much drier for them as well.

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melaleuca-linariifolia-mini-mel.jpgA note to gardens in cooler climates, quite a few melaleucas, including these newer dwarf cultivars, clearly dislike frosts down to -70C or lower, especially in their early years.
Melaleuca linarifolia “Mini Me” grow to 0.3m x  1m and M. linarifolia “Purple Tops" or Claret Tops.
This last one has new purple or claret growth.
Grows  to 1-2m.
Mine has yet to flower. But is supposed to flower in Spring.A dwarf, evergreen shrub that naturally forms a round dense ball. The new growth is smoky bronze red and emits a rich aroma when crushed.The best place to grow your miniature Melaluecas is in full sun and they can take most soil types. Will also grow in dappled shade.
Melaleuca linarifolia Mini Mel grows to 0.3 x 1 metre.
A dwarf, evergreen shrub that naturally forms a round dense ball. The new growth is smoky bronze red and emits a rich aroma when crushed.

 



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Real World Gardener Part 2 of Designing A Garden in New York State in Design Elements

September 7th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Designing a garden in New York state with Landscape Designer Glenice Buck. : www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au 

This series of garden design is about a garden in New York State and is situated very near to the Hudson river that also flows through New York.

Today’s challenges are to discover what plants including trees are growing there.

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Looking through the trees at the south point. Photo Glenice Buck

The first thing that needed doing was to walk around the 2 acre property's perimeter and assess the vegetation, even identify the trees.

Not so easy when they’ve lost their leaves.

It seemed overgrown, like a forest of trees and dense undergrowth.

Also, what environmental problems that the garden faces, and not just the weather but things that might be on the move.

The climate zone where Glenice has designed the garden has temperatures down to -200C in winter with 40 inches or about a metre of snow on average, and in summer up to 300 C.

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Looking towards the north point of the property in New York State. photo: Glenice Buck

After lots of walking around and taking photos, other landscape design essentials were garnered such as sun patterns, drainage, aspect, soil types, weeds and the four legged pests, the Deer.

Certainly big extremes of temperate which we don’t get here in Australia.

Still, plants that can cope with such extremes can cope with the climate in Australia as well with the exception that they won’t go so well in the tropics and sub-tropics.

 

 

 

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