Real World Gardener Dutchmans Britches or Diascia is Plant of the Week

July 24th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley  owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith, editor www.hortjournal.com.au

Ever heard of a Twinspur? Yes it’s a plant with heart shaped leaves and flowers not unlike a Snapdragon because Snapdragons are its cousin.

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Native of South Africa, these plants are perennial in warm and temperate climates and possibly even survive longer than annuals in cooler climates.

Newer varieties have names like Apple Blossom, Little Charmer, Apricot and Snow.

 LISTEN TO THE PODCAST
Diascias have been around for many years and in the past have been known as Dutchman's Britches!
Why Dutchman's Britches? Because the lower part of the flowers looks like those blowsy pants that Dutchmen used to wear in the 19th century.
diascia-single%2Bflwr.pngWhether you want to call them Twinspurs or Dutchman's Britches, these plants are fast growing garden plants in most well-draining garden soils where the beds have been well prepared with some compost incorporated in the bed before planting.

Use an organic fertiliser like Blood and Bone pelleted manures.

Also fortnightly applications of a weak solution of a balanced liquid fertilizer will help them along.

When flowering seems to be fading the plants can be pruned to rejuvenate them and get a second flush of flowers.

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Real World Gardener Part 2 Designing A Rural Garden

July 24th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

talking with Landscape Designer Glenice Buck http://glenicebuckdesigns.com.au/

Last week a new series about re-working a garden on a farm property.

Today, Glenice works out where to put the fences to mark the garden.



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Peppercorn Tree Drive-way photo Glenice Buck

It’s always interesting finding out what it’s like to be on someone’s personal journey in starting a garden on a location that used to be a farm paddock?

Finding out what challenges they faced. Was the soil be any good? Did they leave the existing trees? Was there a weed problem?

As the property is a working farm, Glenice said the she knew that for any plants to be able to grow, they needed to fence off the garden area so that the sheep and cattle wouldn't eat the plants.

The existing mature trees are about 100 years old and need to be considered as well.

Do they make up the garden?

(Listen to the podcast to hear all the details)

You would think that you should just get in there and start planting things without worrying too much about the soil and stuff.

Not so. If you don’t get the soil right, the aspect right and the drainage right, your putting yourself onto a patch of unhappy gardening. You also have to consider the climate to know what plants will survive.

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Truck arriving with first load of plants photo Glenice Buck

 

The climate in the area has a temperature range of -4 C to mid 40's C

They also experience heavy frosts in winter and heat-waves in summer.

Average rainfall is 24 inches per year.

The weeds included Marshmallow weed, that had to be eradicated before the first truck of plants arrived.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Yellowing Leaves in Plant Doctor

July 24th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

 

 

PLANT DOCTOR

Talking with Steve Falcioni, General Manager www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Why do plants' leaves turn various shades of yellow?

DSC_1981.JPGYellowing leaves on your plant can be confusing, frustrating and even annoying if you don’t know what the cause is.

 

You’re plant could be in a container or in the ground, and during the colder months, those yellow leaves seem to become more prominent.

One of the reasons your plant's leaves may be turning yellow is because all leaves have a limited life-span, and just before they drop, the nutrients are pulled out of the leaf turning it yellow.

 

But what about other problems?

Listen to the podcast to hear all of the information

If the new leaves are paler but the old leaves are still a bright green, it's generally a sign of nutrient deficiency.

If the veins are distinctly green and the space between the veins is yellow, then it's probably iron chlorosis or iron deficiency.

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Did you know that iron deficiency is pretty common in acid loving plants such as roses, fruit trees, camellias and even vegetables.

In this case the young leaves are yellow and the veins are green.

Magnesium deficiency on the other hand is more common in citrus as well as camellias and vegetables. Again acid loving plants.

It can be confusing because there’s a third deficiency that looks like a worst cause iron deficiency caused by not enough zinc and manganese

However, there are a range of products you can buy to fix these deficiencies.

If you have any questions about yellowing leaves and are not sure what the problem is, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Argy’s or Marguerite Daisies are Plant of the Week

July 17th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Talking about Marguerite daisies with Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au and garden nursery owner Jeremy Critchley www.thegreengallery.com.au

 

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In the past, when we’ve planted out daisy bushes, they’ve become straggly or just too big to look tidy.

 

In steps these new daisy varieties, and who can tell if they’re a Shasta daisy or a Marguerite daisy?

 

Is there a difference and does it matter?

 

Because they're so bright and colourful, you just want some in your garden

 

These particular daisies are colourful, easy to grow, flower a lot and have grayish green, deeply lobed leaves that are ferny and emit a strong fragrance when crushed.

 

They’ve been around in our Australian gardens for a long time, but what’s new about these plants?

 

 

Often mistaken for Shasta daisy and other daisies.

Argies can have flower types such as single or semi double and double flower types.

Plants are salt and wind tolerant and will grow in full sun to part shade, although they'll flower less in part-shade.

Those Marguerite daisies where you can see the centre, these are yellow centres and are the disc florets. The outside petals are the ray florets.

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Jeremy's photo

Leaves are finely divided glaucous green foliage with a fragrant (to some) scent.

 

Argyranthemum or "Argies" are evergreen woody-based perennials or sub-shrubs, that grow no more than 30cm in height with white, yellow or pink, daisy-like flower-heads from late spring to autumn .

 

As Jeremy mentioned the new Sassy® Series of Marguerite daisy are compact plants with frilly foliage and many daisy-like flowers.

 

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These rounded plants give off lots of flowers on their stem tips.

They first appear early in the spring and continue for a long flowering season. Each flower opens with a button-like golden yellow eye, and depending on the cultivar, have either lemon yellow, white or pink petals



 

 

 

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Real World Gardener Re-Working a Garden in rural NSW in Design Elements

July 17th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

talking with Glenice Buck www.gbdesigns.com.au

 

Today starts a new 4 part series on re-designing a garden.

The setting is rural on a farm property, but within that property, a garden is created around the house.

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"Berkshire" photo Glenice Buck

Over the next 4 weeks, you’ll be taken on a journey from the initial assessment of the site, the design process and planning, then the planting.

Even though your garden may not be as big, there’s some aspects of this project that you can borrow.

It may be the layout of the front garden or the plants that are selected, or even considerations of what to do with the slope of the land.

Did you know that in colonial times, farmers would plant 2 Bunya pines at the front of their property as "way finders?"

 Bunya pines grow very tall, so that looking from a vantage point from a long distance, the stockmen or farmers, could find their way back to their own homestead.

Of course back then, there probably was quite a lot more native vegetation and no roads like we have today.

 Or maybe it’s just an interesting insight to how your go about developing a 5 acre garden.



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Real World Gardener Feed Your Soil in The Good Earth

July 17th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

THE GOOD EARTH

Soil_food_webUSDA.jpgwith Margaret Mossakowska

www.mosshouse.com.au

An incredible diversity of organisms make up the soil food web.

 

They range in size from the tiniest one-celled bacteria, algae, fungi, and protozoa, to the more complex nematodes and micro-arthropods, to the visible earthworms, insects, small vertebrates, and plants.

 

These organisms not only benefit our soil but the plants that grow in them.

 

So how do we feed those organisms or attract them to the soil in our garden?

 

 

You probably have never thought about what soil organisms are doing in your garden or even wondered why you garden soil should even have them?

Did you know that by-products from your plants’ growing roots and plant residue feed soil organisms?

That’s good because in turn, soil organisms support plant health as they decompose organic matter, cycle nutrients, enhance soil structure, and control the populations of soil organisms including crop pests.

You can make a weed tea which when poured over your garden will get those micro-organisms working for you.

 

Weed Tea recipe.

Composting%2Btea.jpgOne bucket with lid: Big bunch of garden weeds to about half the bucket: Cover with water.

Stir daily.

Your mixture will become frothy and smelly-that's fermentation.

When the smell has dissipated, your weed tea is ready.

Strain off the weed seeds, and dilute in the ratio 1 part weed tea to 10 parts water.

Most watering cans are 9 litres so your weed tea will be 90 ml or if you like, just a bit less than a litre.

If you have any questions about food for your soil, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Plant of the Week is Hellebores or Winter Roses

July 10th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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PLANT OF THE WEEK

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Hellebore Ivory Prince

Sometimes called winter roses or Lenten roses, these small plants fit nicely into the shaded garden.

They used to have one problem with their flowers.

The flowers always pointed downwards and if you didn’t have them in a raised bed, you didn’t really get to enjoy the flowers so much.

Not so the newer cultivars of winter roses, with their much brighter colours.



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Hellebore Jacob Royal



In their natural environment Hellebores love shaded conditions, such as the edges of deciduous woodland, dryer in summer and damp in the cooler months. If you’re wondering where to put your Hellebores think shaded but they’re more tolerant of exposed sunny positions in cooler, high altitude regions.



 

 

 

Winter Roses are both low maintenance and really hardy. They are useful for growing in hard to fill shaded areas such as beneath deciduous trees. Ensure they are planted in part shade or morning sun for best results. In heavy shade they will grow but not flower as well as they could.



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Hellebore Lola



The flowers of Winter Rose can be picked and put in a vase or removed from their stems and floated in a bowl of water. Plunge the freshly picked stems into boiling water before putting in a vase to extend their show. Once established in a part shade location Hellebores are reasonably dry tolerant requiring only occasional deep watering during extended periods of heat.

 

Did you know Hellebores are related to Aquilegia, Clematis and Delphinium? As with some other members of the Ranunculaceae family, Hellebores are poisonous.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Potting Mixes Explained part 2

July 10th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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SOIL SAVVY

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African Violet 'Tineke'

Talking with Horticultural Scientist Penny Smith

www.penelopesgarden.com.au

Potting mix can vary from brand to brand and of course there’s often a big price difference between the cheaper brands and the more expensive ones.

So should we just buy any old potting mix?

to begin with, you should always buy mix that's suitable for the plant.

African violets have their special mix so their fine roots can grow properly.

orchid%2Bpotting%2Bmix.pngOrchids, on the other hand, need a very chunky, open mix because their roots need to have more space to grow.

After you hear this segment, you might want to rethink your purchase choice.

There’s quite a lot of information about potting mix, and I suppose the one thing we didn’t mention is that idea of putting broken pits of pot, or foam pieces over the drainage hole.

Not a good idea because you create what’s called a perched water table in that the water doesn’t want to make that leap from potting mix to another substrate and mostly stays at the bottom of the pot and around the roots.

If you’re worried about potting mix falling out of the hole, just put some open weave mesh across it.

 

 

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Real World Gardener is Gardening After Heavy Rain on The Good Earth

July 10th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition

The Good Earth

Gardening After Heavy Rain

Talking with Margaret Mossakowska from www.mosshouse.com.au

 

So your ground’s all soggy and damp in your backyard. Should you wait until it dries or get out there and do a bit of gardening?

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photo M Cannon

The very least you should be doing is finding out “Where does water sit? What gets washed away? How are your drains working or failing? All things you can repair and get working for the future success of your garden.

 

For the lawn, a bit of aeration with a garden fork will help improve the drainage of wet soil.

Mix some gypsum with some river sand and rake it into the holes in the lawn.

Apart from making some holes to allow air in and for the water to fill and again evaporate, check out those snails and slugs.

Snails and slugs are opportunists and thrive and reproduce when times are good – they love the rain and the wet conditions afterwards.

There’s plenty of ways to control them,

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photo M. Cannon

from the whimsical container with a splash of beer in it, to snail traps placed level with the garden bed the snails go in and never leave.

Also look out for mould, moss and mildew that might grow on shady, damp paths over the winter months.

A weak solution of vinegar and water will kill mould and mildew.

If you have any questions about problems with your waterlogged garden, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Daphne odora is Plant of the Week

July 2nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

daphne%2Bodora.png Sabina Fielding Smith
Do you love scent in the garden?

Perhaps not the cloying scent of Jonquils or common Jasmine, but a more delicate scent that floats through the air.

Often the scented plants we crave don’t grow that well in our region, but that’s not stopped gardeners from trying.

We love to grow hard to find, difficult to grow plants that hold that alluring something.

Today’s plant, Daphne odora, or Daphne is of course scented and has a reputation.

 

 



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Daphne eternal Fragrance



Odora of course means fragrant in latin.

Possibly the most strongly perfumed of the genus and the most commonly grown in Australia, mainly in the cooler, south-east.

As we mentioned, it grows best in fertile, slightly acid, peaty, well-drained soils.


Dahne grows in full sun or partial shade, and is hardy to −10 °C (14 °F), possibly lower.


The best advice seems to be: do not disturb the roots; provide fertile, well-drained soil, morning sun, shelter from afternoon heat and water; not too much and not too little! And, don’t feel too bad if it dies as you will be in very good company.

 

 

 

 

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