Real World Gardener Yellow Cottonwood is Plant of the Week

June 28th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith  editor www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley nursery owner www.thegreengallery.com.au


Yellow Cottonwood Tree 

Talipariti tiliaceum syn Hibiscus tiliaceus .

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Would you like a small tree in your garden with beautiful heart shaped leaves and lemony yellow hibiscus like flowers with a maroon centre?

Better still, if you like butterflies, the leaves are the food plant for the larval stages of the Common Oakblue Butterfly.

 

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Gnarly trunk of mature Talipariti tiliaceum syn. Hibiscus tiliaceus

Commonly found growing on beaches, by rivers and in mangrove swamps. Sea Hibiscus is well adapted to grow in coastal environment in that it tolerates salt and waterlogging and can grow in quartz sand, coral sand, marl, limestone, and crushed basalt.

Like some other plants in the Malvaceae or mallow family, the flowers change colour as they age, turning dull orange or reddish by the time they fall.

 

In winter there may be few or no flowers in mild-tropical or subtropical climates, but the flowers may remain on the tree for more than a single day



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Talipariti tiliaceum Rubra



Yellow Cottonwood  or Hibiscus tiliaceus is a fast-growing tree which is best suited to landscaping, although it can be kept in containers if properly pruned and potted up as necessary. It can be also grown successfully as a bonsai.

This plant prefers full sun but can be grown indoors if placed by a window where it can get as much sun as possible, preferably in the morning, although it may be very difficult to get flowers indoors.



For something different why not tree  Bronze cottonwood that has the same yellow flowers but deep red foliage.

If you have any questions about growing

 

 

 

 

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Real World GArdener Green Colours in Design Elements

June 28th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network.

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Lesley Simpson

This series is all about colour in the garden.

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Do you ever think about the colour of the leaves and grass in your garden as being part of your colour scheme?

Of course, green’s a colour and it’s in your garden. So unless you’re making the effort to only use grey or silver leaved plants in your garden, you will have some amount of green there. Possibly too much green.

 

original%2Bcolour%2Bwheel.jpgDid you know that the first colour wheel has been attributed to Sir Isaac Newton?

colour%2Bwheel.jpgNewton in 1706 arranged red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet into a natural progression on a rotating disk.

But it was in 1810  that a Mr Goethe Farbkreis introduced the first systematically organized colour wheel?

His observations on the effect of opposed colours led him to a symmetric arrangement of his colour wheel, where he wrote "for the colours diametrically opposed to each other… are those which reciprocally evoke each other in the eye."

 

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Real World Gardener Common Container Plant Problems on Plant Doctor

June 28th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

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Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

PLANT DOCTOR

with Steve Falcioni, General Manager www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

How many pot plants do you have in the garden?

Are you always saying, ‘I’ve got to get rid of all those pot plants, I’ve got too many?”

1-1ststeps.jpgPerhaps you’ve only got a couple of pot plants.

Either way, there’ll be a time when your plant in your pot starts to look unwell.

You plants could have anything from yellowing leaves, to semi-circular holes taken out the leaves.

So what can you do about this

problem and how can you be sure you’re treating the right problem?



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irstly, those semi-circular holes taken out of leaves, mainly rose leaves, are caused by a native bee called the leaf cutter bee.

Leaf cutter bees are solitary native bees that nest inside cavities and build their egg cells with pieces of leaves.

They build multiple egg chambers per nest hole and in every one of them they lay an egg with a little bit of pollen, nectar and saliva so that the larvae can grow and develop.

Leaf-cutter-bee_-Photo-theangryblender.j

leaf cutter bee photo. theangryblender

Before you get cranky at these bees taking the clean circular bites out of your plants’ leaves, did you know that the leaf cutter bee are very important pollinators of crops like clover, alfalfa, fruits, some vegetables — such as onions and carrots — and wildflowers?

 

How can you recognize leaf cutter bees?

These bees look like your regular honey bee and to the untrained eye they might be mistaken for one.

But here is the tip: while honey bees carry pollen in their corbicula (special structures in the tibia of the hind leg), leaf cutter bees carry the pollen that they collect on their scopa (elongated hairs on the abdomen).

Also, many times you will see these bees carrying parts of leaves back to their nest and honey bees don’t do this at all.

If you have any questions about problems with your plants in pots, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Nemesia is Plant of the Week

June 21st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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Click here

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 with Jeremy Critchley owner of  www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith, editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

 

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Nemesias with fragrance. photo J Critchley

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You mightn’t have heard about this next low growing winter flower perennial, Nemesia species, with names like Quince, Cruela, Clementine and Raspberry.

If not, then you’ve been limiting your flower border or hanging baskets to the same old winter plants, like pansies and primulas.

Nemesia is in the snapdragon family.

Cool temperatures are fine for growing this plant and it’s frost tolerant once hardened off if you’re growing from seed.

1-IMG_4035.JPGAlso daylength doesn’t affect flowering of the new varieties that can flower for many months of the year.

The new Nemesias are also more tolerant of sun and can survive the summer months.

 

They’re at their best when massed.

 

Nemesias prefer to be planted in a sunny position but can still flower in part shade, alothough somewhat less.

 

Nemesias are ideal for bedding plants, borders, cluster planting and containers.

The vibrant colours of golden yellow, sunset red, clear pink, golden orange and creamy white flowers will certainly light up the garden beds, not to mention the fragrance that can be apparent up to 20 metres away.

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Real World Gardener Cool Colours in Garden Design

June 21st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Lesley Simpson

This series is all about colour in the garden. Part 4-Cool colours in garden design.

Did you do art at school? You probably did and may even know about the colour wheel.

 

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Cool colours with greys and pinks

This next segment is about using cool colours in garden design. Cool colours fall on the purple-blue-green side of the colour wheel and also include white, gray, and silver but not black.

Classic cool-colour combinations include blue and pink, a range of blues arranged in a monochromatic scheme, or purple and silver.

 Pastel forms of traditionally warm colours such as yellow, salmon, and apricot also fit into a cool-theme garden plan.

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Real World Gardener Star anise and Aniseed on Spice It Up

June 21st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

SPICE IT UP

with Ian Hemphill www.herbies.com.au

 

Licorice flavours can come from a number of different spices.

This flavour is because of anethole being present in the herb or spice.

You may have heard of an Australian native tree, Aniseed myrtle that used to be Backhousia anisata and is now Aneothola anisata.

But we’re not talking about trees with leaves that have an aniseed flavour but two spices that you can use in your cooking if you like the flavour.

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Star anise (left) Aniseed (right)

 

Star anise is the dried whole ripe fruit of Illicium verum, an evergreen tree native to China.

Aniseed isn’t really a seed but the dried whole ripe fruit of Pimpinella anisum, a flowering plant native to the Mediterranean region and Southwest Asia.

Both are quite different and both get their licorice flavour from the anethole they contain.

The main difference is that star anise also contains safrole which gives a more distinct aroma to the spice.

Did you know though that the real liquorice plant is Glycyrrhiza glabra.

The root of the plant is used by first being pulped, then boiled, and the liquorice is then concentrated by evaporation.

If you have any questions about star anise or aniseed, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Australian Tuckeroo is Plant of the Week

June 12th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

 ( click here )

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 

with Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.c

tuckeroo%2Bfruits.png  The Tuckeroo is an Australian native tree is a good all-rounder that doesn’t grow too tall.

It’s not known for its flower but more for the decorative fruit  that is the favourite food of many fruit eating birds.

It’s the fruit which will catch your eye.

Rather large three sided orange berries, in bunches all over the tips of the branches.

Not only birds like the fruit but it’s the food plant for the larval stages of many butterflies such as Pale Ciliate Blue, Dark Ciliate Blue, Marginata Blue, Hairy Blue, Fiery Jewel, Common Oakblue, Fielder's Lineblue and Glistening Blue Butterflies.

 

tuckeroo%2Btree.pngAccording to information from the native tree dept. (Aust. Govt) this is a great tree along with Harpullia pendula  for the east coast of Australia and also for South Australian climates.

 

There’s a listener question about transplanting Tuckeroo trees.

The short answer is transplanting of the Tuckeroos isn’t successful.

The plants throw down a fairly large tap root and on plants up to 50cm in size the tap root is about 40cm. At that size they’re just about all tap root and no laterals, so that if you dig them up you’re likely to break that tap root and the plant won’t survive.

 

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Real World Gardener Hot Colours in Design Elements

June 12th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Lesley Simpson

Using Hot Colours

This series is all about colour in the garden.

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The best way to learn how to use colour in the garden is to try different combinations and decide what you like and don't like.

Red adds energy and excitement and this colour works well as an accent and to highlight an area. But not everyone likes red in the garden.

On the other hand perhaps you’re after a garden where the colours jump out at you?

If you do, this segment’s for you.

There are many ways of combining colours for different effects.

 Colours change constantly depending on their surroundings and colours seem to change depending on what they’re next to, as well as how much light they receive, what texture the flower is, and so on.

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Hot colours can look cool when teamed with white.

A colour's brightness gets more so when it is placed next to a contrasting colour (one that falls opposite it on the colour wheel).

A colour’s intensity gets less when placed next to a colour that lies next to it on the colour wheel).

 

 

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Real World Gardener Winter Tasks on the Good Earth

June 12th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

THE GOOD EARTH

with Margaret Mossakowska of www.mosshouse.com.au

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Plant out your winter vegetables now.

Some people think that gardening is only seasonal, that is, only Spring and Summer and then gardeners do nothing much at all in between.

Sure, gardeners are pretty busy in those times, but in winter, there’s still plenty to do.

For starters, your garden’s pests and weeds don’t take a break.

 

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Broadbeans for a winter crop

Looking after your garden all year round is not only great for the garden, but great for the gardener as well.

Pruning dormant plants is something that you can do on sunny winter days.

It also lets you see if there’s some problem with the plant, like die back or borer on the stems.

In the coldest month of the year when soil temperatures are starting to dip, few vegies will germinate from seed in cold soil.

But, if you’re keen to do some planting you could try sowing spinach, onions, leeks, peas, turnips, kale, broccoli, cabbage and broad beans.

Don’t overwater at this time of year because the combination of cold and wet will cause your seeds to rot.

Keep the soil just moist until germination occurs. If you have any questions about winter tasks in your garden, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

 

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Real World Gardener Cyclamen are Plants of the Week

June 8th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au

and Karen Smith editor of hort journal www.hortjournal.com.au

You would have been seeing Cyclamen almost everywhere since about mid-autumn.

different%2Bcoloured%2Bcyclamen.jpg

Some, usually the bigger ones, have even got a light perfume, while others just have their outstanding colour and form with which to dazzle you.

Did you know that this next plant, the cyclamen, along with the columbine or grannys bonnet, was one of the flowers of choice for Leonardo Da Vinci at the beginning of the 16th century?

He liked them so much that he covered the margins of his manuscripts with drawings of them.

My sister tells me that she has been throwing out her Cyclamen when it dies down after flowering. Is this you?

You know you should be hanging onto the tuber so your Cyclamen can re-flower for you in the following year.

 

frilly%2Bcyclamen.pngThe Cyclamen lifecycle is one of shooting up leaves at the beginning of autumn. That's when you take them from the shady position in the garden and put your potted cyclamen somewhere where it receives dappled sunlight.

At this time give it some fertiliser of any kind.

Water your cyclamen when the soil in the pot feels dry to the touch.

Too much water will cause leaves to yellow and the tuber to be susceptible to rotting.

After your cyclamen has finished flowering and the leaves have died down, put the pot somewhere where it won't get too much rain. Even turn the pot on it's side. Now it's ready for the dormant stage before restarting the lifecycle next Autumn.

 

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You might not be aware that in the language of love, giving someone a cyclamen expresses sincere feelings and why not? With flowers looking like butterflies.

Thanks to its tuber, cyclamen cope with neglect and other tough conditions.

The tuber, which is in fact a swollen root won’t ever have corms or bulb offsets, however, as in the case with the  potato (which is a similar organism), the tuber can be divided provided each portion has both a growth eye and part of the rooting region of the tuber..

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