Real World Gardener NEW Boston ferns are Plant of the Week

May 31st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley owner of www.thegreengallery.com.au

and Karen Smith, editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

 

Not all ferns should be relegated to the bathroom. That's was a real 70's thing that still hangs around some of our memories now.

Are we still putting ferns in our bathrooms?  wWat about outdoors?

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When you go into your garden do you feel relaxed or are you always thinking about what jobs you have to do next?

The job thing can sometimes overtake your pleasure in the garden.

Why not instead of concentrating on all those tasks, reward yourself with some new plants that are instantly appealing, don’t require much maintenance and help with the calmness and relaxation of the garden.

We're  talking about ferns , Boston ferns or Nephralepis exaltata.

 You can buy a Boston Fern from just about anywhere, plus it’s relatively cheap and is a great starter fern. They look a bit like the weed, the fishbone fern, but aren't known to be a problem in the garden.

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There are now 20 different varieties to choose from, whereas back in the heyday of the 70's and 80's, there was only ever one type of boston fern.

 

The boston fern of today comes with a wide variety of foliage even crinkly foliage.

Maybe that's harking back to the 80's still and the crimped hair craze?

 

Any fern is great if you enjoy the lush green foliage and the feelings of peace and tranquility they seem to create.

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It's also one of the top rated plants for removing air pollutants from the air and because of its almost large appetite for water it pumps out vast amounts of water vapour into the nearby air, increasing surrounding humidity.

 

Ferns like moist shady places indoors or out.

 

Mist spray them if they're indoors, but if you're growing your boston ferns outdoors, and they end up looking a bit burnt or straggly, give them a hard prune to rejuvenate them.

 

Ferns reproduce by spores so if you have the right conditions, you may have little fern offspring in various moist shady places in your garden.

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Real World Gardener Starting a garden from Scratch part 4

May 31st, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Peter Nixon

This series is all about starting a garden from scratch, and today’s episodes not so much about choosing the right plants as about putting them in the right place.

You’ve bought the plants, you’ve considered how big they will grow.

Today we’re discussing plantings to make it clear to new visitors where the entrance to the house is among other planting problems.

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Finding the front door-is it obvious?

You can completely obscure the front door with a huge frangipani.

If you love frangipani’s but don’t have the room for Plumeria rubra, then opt for a smaller choice of frangipani, such as Plumeria pudica.

Then there’s the privacy issue to block out the neighbours.

Usually you need something that fits in a narrow space.

Climbing plants fits the bill but create strong support so that the fence is taking the weight of your planting.

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Choose sturdy supports for your climbing plants.

 

Use something like Marine grade stainless steel grow cables of fairly high gauge for those heavy climbers and attach it to strong posts.

 

 

 

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Real World Gardener Pelicans are Wildlife in Focus

May 31st, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

with Andrew Patrick from the Cumberland Bird Observers Group. www.cboc.org.au

pelicans.png

We’ve all seen seagulls flocking to food around beaches but there’s another bird which attracts lots of tourists, even as much as tens of thousands of families and locals when they’re being fed.

While the people are watching, they get an entertaining and educated commentary about the pelicans, and marine life and general information about the area.

 

One of the main objectives of the pelican feed  in popular resort areas, is to keep an eye on the pelican's medical conditions as many have hooks and lines tangles up in their gullets, wings and other parts of their body.

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The feed is a chance for the co-ordinator to assess their well being. It's certainly an amusing show to come and see.

At least 1 or 2 birds a week are removed from the water and sometimes the outcome is bad for the injured birds but most times its just a simple extraction of a hook and they are on their way.

The Entrance has now been internationally recognised as 'The Pelican Capital of Australia' and we want you to be part of it. So when you visit us at The Entrance be sure to wander down to the pelican pavilion on the foreshore for an experience you will treasure.

If you have any questions about Pelicans from your garden, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener NEW African Daisy is Plant of the Week

May 22nd, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

osteospermum.pngwith Jeremy Critchley of www.thegreengallery.com.au

 and Karen Smith, editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

They look a lot like daisies and they are in the Asteraceae family, along with Shasta daisies and zinnia. But when these African daisies were first introduced to the market, they had colouring we weren't used to seeing. Many of their centre disks looked as though they were coloured with metallic paint.

Jeremy grows 63 different colour variations in his nursery. Just imagine. Some are shades of colours and others are bi-colours.

 

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Botanical Bite

The daisy flower is not just a single flower but actually a cluster of much smaller flowers.

The "petals" or "sunrays" are individual strap-shaped sterile flowers called "ray florets", and the "central disk" is made of smaller circular shaped individual flowers called "disc florets"

Osteospermums are exceedingly drought tolerant and some varieties are self cleaning.

When they reach about 30 -40cm high they will become a bit leggy. At this stage give them a hard prune to about 10cm above the ground.

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Osteospermum, or African daisies, and sometimes cape daisies.

Those of you who like marguerite daisies will love these daisies too.

There’s a Springstar range of cape daisies with names like Cardinal-a deep red, Magenta, Big Yellow, Cinnamon Orange Dark Pink and Kokoa-a dusky pink.

All of these have a white halo around the central disk.

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Real World Gardener Starting a Garden From Scratch Series part 3

May 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Peter Nixon

Starting from scratch garden series part 3 - Playing with plants

This series is all about starting a garden from scratch, in which case you now had done battle with the lawn or with a mass of weeds.

Alright now that you’ve decided to do something with that bare patch of lawn, you drawn a plan of the layout.

The next thing is think about what plants you might want to put into those beds.

Believe me, I know how hard it is to put off getting your first vegetables, herbs and other plants into the ground. 

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Planting is fun

If you just start your garden with no substantial forethought, you’ll only end up wishing you had taken the time to really think out a few things. 

It’s  important to really consider what plants will work in your layout and purpose of your garden. 

 

Once you start digging your beds and establishing your paths, you won’t want to start over when you realize it would have been better if you’d just did it that other way.

For example if you want to grow veggies then long straight raised beds about a metre wide are easier to work with.

You’ll want your paths at least 1 ½ metres  wide so you can use a wheelbarrow or bucket or even just drag the hose around without creating havoc. 

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Planting out your garden

Draw a basic overhead view and pencil in where you think things might go.

But if you're wanting a flower garden of some sort and if you’ve never had your own garden before, chances are you will be overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of variety in the plant world.

Take your time, don’t just buy the plants that are available at your garden centre.

There are garden clubs and plant societies that hold annual plant shows.

These may have a whole lot of different and less available plants that you might like.

Not to mention garden catalogs.

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Real World Gardener Fermenting Vegetables on The Good Earth

May 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

THE GOOD EARTH

with Margaret Mossakowska from www.mosshouse.com.au

Some people who have you believe that fermenting veggies is something new and trendy. They’re even calling it the “Art of Fermentation.”

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Ingredients for fermenting

Before stoves and refrigerators, fermenting veggies allowed people to preserve food in a nutritional and safe way.

Think foods such as cheese, yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchee, olives, salami, jerky and even bread. And think beverages such as wine and beer, not to mention coffee and hot chocolate. All of these — and many more — are examples of fermented foods.

Well, really, it’s been done for thousands of years and is just going through a revival.

 

Fermenting vegetables is the new ‘in’thing because it’s a “live food, because they contain “living bacteria,” that in turn helps digest other foods in the digestive tract.

Fermented foods have a natural tart flavour because the sugars and carbohydrates have been broken down and used up during fermentation.

In the case of vegetables, they’re more digestible than raw ones and just about any raw vegetable can be safely fermented at home, if done properly.

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Kim Chee preserves

Why not start with cabbage, daikon radishes, turnips, parsnips, cucumbers, okra, string beans and green tomatoes, as they’re good candidates for fermentation.

Margaret's Kimchee recipe

Red cabbage

Black Spanish radish

Carrot

Salt the grated  and finely sliced veggies first and leave overnight.

Next day,

add slush made from onions garlic, chilli and ginger and pulverised in a food processer.

All you need to do now is put them in a crock or sterilised jars.

If you have any questions about fermenting vegetables from your garden, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Anthuriums are Plant of the Week

May 17th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 PLANT OF THE WEEK

Anthurium species.

 

with Jeremy Critchley, owner www.thegreengallerynursery.com.au

and Karen Smith, editor www.hortjournal.com.au

At the beginning of the program I mentioned the benefits of having one or three indoor plants.

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Anthurium adreanum White King

This next plant can be planted indoors, but remember, indoor plants are just plants that can grow outside if you have the right conditions.

So don’t be constrained to just keeping them in the house, balcony or verandah.

 

 

 

 

The brightly coloured heart shaped spathe or a waxy modified leaf and isn’t the flower.

anthurium%2Bandreanum%2Bsingle%2Bflower.The bit that pokes out, or the spadix, contains the real tiny flowers.

 

Anthuriums, don't like to be constantly wet, but don't let them dry out completely.

They grow well in temperate areas outdoors, as well as in the tropics and sub tropics.

Feed them with any organic fertiliser or controlled release prills for pot plants.

 

Here are some varieties to get you going.Anthurium andreanum 'Amazing Queen'  has big orange flowers or spathes really.

 

There’s also Black Queen with  an almost black spathe and White King with a white spathe.

 

These all have been bred for massive flowering, clumping, disease resistance and cold tolerance down to 10 C.

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Anthurium Black Queen

After a few years Anthuriums will form aerial roots, so that’s when you should think about repotting and dividing them.

The best time to do this is in spring or autumn, when the weather is warm, but not hot.These aerial roots can be planted below the surface.But don’t let that put you off from buying one of the many hybrids that Jeremy mentioned.

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Real World Gardener Starting A Garden from Scratch part 2

May 17th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Starting your garden from scratch part 2- No Dig Gardening

with landscape designer Peter Nixon.

This series is all about starting a garden from scratch, in which case you might have to do battle with the lawn or with a mass of weeds.

But even before that you need to know your soil..

When plants aren't growing properly after you've supplied them with the correct amount of sunlight and water, and when you've ruled out pests, then the problem usually lies underground. But there are other ways to start a garden.

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Raised garden beds in background.

then you're faced with that bare patch of lawn that you want to convert into a garden.

Here is the no dig method a la Peter Nixon.

First lay down some cardboard sheets of the area you want to convert to a garden.

this should stop the lawn for growing because you are blocking out the sun.

Next pile on many cubic metres of compost and cow manure.

Then let it settle for about 3 months!

 If you’re battling a weedy patch in the garden, perhaps where there was lawn that was infested with weeds.

Find out what those weeds are so you can  work out the best way to get rid of them without wasting money on chemicals that you mighn’t need.

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Real World Gardener Spice It Up with Caraway

May 17th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com



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Caraway Seed Cake



SPICE IT UP

with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

This next spice is used to flavour a whole lot of food that we eat.

Think Havarti cheese, rye bread, sauerkraut and caraway seed cake in Britain.

What may surprise you is that the roots can be cooked as a vegetable like parsnips or carrots, and, the leaves are sometimes eaten as herbs, either raw, dried, or cooked, just like you would with parsley.



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Caraway plant



Caraway (Carum carvi), is also known as meridian fennel or Persian cumin, and is a biennial plant in the carrot or Apiaceae family.

It’s native to western Asia, Europe and Northern Africa.

Caraway is a spice that we should all be growing along with our parsley and chervil because it’s so versatile.

The plant looks like others in the carrot family, which includes parsley.

Caraway has those finely divided, feathery leaves with thread-like divisions, growing on 20–30 cm stems.

The main flower stem is 40–60 cm tall, with small white or pink flowers in umbels.

Did you know that Caraway seeds are actually meant to be called fruits? In fact they’re crescent-shaped achenes, around 2 mm long, with five pale ridges.

If you have any questions about growing caraway, or have some growing in your garden, send in a photo  or write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

Caraway Seed Cake Recipe

Ingredients-

  • 175g (6oz) butter, softened
  • 175g (6oz) caster sugar
  • 3 medium eggs
  • 250g (8oz) self-raising flour
  • 38g jar caraway seeds
  • 2tbsp milk
  • 1kg (2lb) loaf tin, buttered and lined with a strip of baking parchment

How To Bake

Tip all the ingredients into a bowl and beat until smooth. Spoon mixture into the loaf tin and level the surface.

Bake the cake in the centre of the oven 160°C (320°F, gas mark 3) for 45 mins-1 hr, or until the cake feels just firm to the touch in the centre, and a skewer comes out clean when inserted into cake.Remove the cake from the oven and leave to cool in the tin for 10-15 mins.Transfer it to a wire rack to cool completely.

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Real World GArdener Lemon Scented Myrtle is Plant of the Week

May 13th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

Plant of the Week

Backhousia citriodora Lemon Scented Myrtle

 

1-HID_2956%2B(2).JPGIf you’re not growing one of these trees in your garden, you’re missing out on some great bush tucker.<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

This tree has strongly aromatic leaves that can be used in teas, and cooking, such as in biscuits, in Asian cuisine and wherever you like generally.

Leaves from this tree can be used as a substitute for lemongrass in Asian cooking.

 

Not only that, this tree can put on a stunning show of flowers in late spring early summer.

Some councils even grow these as street trees.

They’ve been used for thousands of years by indigenousAustralians.

 

Lemon myrtle in a dried powdered from can be used in baking cakes and biscuits.

One teaspoon of lemon scented myrtle to one cup of flour is recommended.

Backhousia citriodora is slightly frost-tender when young but can be grown outside in frosty areas provided it is planted in a sheltered position in semi-shade.

 

Did you know that several specimens are thriving in the Australian National Botanic Gardens in Canberra in the Rainforest Gully where some protection is provided by the tree canopy and surrounding shrubbery.

Temperatures as low as -8ºC have been recorded in this section of the Gardensduring winter.

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