Real World Gardener NEW Euphorbias in Plant of the Week

April 26th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley www.thegreengallery.com.au

and Karen Smith www.hortjournal.com.au

 

 

Some of you may know Euphorbias in the perennial border.

Did you know that the variation within this genus is amazing, some people might even say awesome.

 From low-growing garden weeds called petty spurge to giant, cactus-like succulents.

Segue to an annual called Gypsophila or baby’s breath. What do they have in common with several newish cultivars of Euphorbia for your garden

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Euphorbia Diamond Frost

 

The petals are actually small and dainty like baby’s breath, but there are so many of them that the leaves are scarcely visible.

These new delicate looking but tough, high impact Euphorbia plants flower every day of the year in warmer climates.

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Pink sparkle

Star Dust White Sparkle’ and Stardust ‘Pink Sparkle are more compact than Diamond Frost and are ideal for patio pots and garden borders in full sun positions.

They grow to a maximum of 60cm x 60cm and can be pruned back quite hard should they get leggy.

Heat and drought tolerant, a truly low maintenance plant.

 

Note:Euphorbias all produce a mostly white latex which they oozes out of the stems when cut, and this sap is often toxic.

 

CULTIVATION TIPS-Euphorbias are easy plants to grow.

Most are summer growers and require a little watering and feeding during the warmer months.

Euphorbia Diamond Frost and the other new cultivars are not frost hardy, unless kept under cover in the colder months.

All of these Euphorbias are extremely tolerant of hot dry weather and perform in hot sun all day.

Keep them almost completely dry in winter.

To maintain their characteristics shapes they need sun or partial sun. Well drained soil and good ventilation are important.

 

 

 

 

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Real World Gardener Design Process part 4 in Design Elements

April 26th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with Glenice Buck www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

The design process series with Glenice Buck, landscape designer, was thought of to lead you, the gardener through the steps that a professional landscape designer would take you.

We started off with how’s and whys of a landscape designer; explained the reasons for having a professional design: outlined the analysis and concept stage and now we’ve hit the final stage.

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Established gardens also need a plant for the future

Advantage of having a Landscape plan –

 Save time, money and wastage in the future.  A landscape Plan is an investment into the future of your outdoor space.

The designer will look at a landscape plan as being a master plan for your garden.

Develop in Stages - It means that the garden can develop in stages especially if your budget is limited. It gives you a connection between all spaces, the areas will still flow and not be disjointed as you have a total plan for the entire site.  It will be your guide as you rejuvenate, replant and restore the garden. 

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Beautiful gardens are planned

Save Time and Cost- By having this document you will also eliminate wasting time in areas which won’t be needed until a later stage in the garden’s development.  For example you may pull up paving in one area but you eventually may like those pavers laid in another area.  Re using and recycling of as many materials and plants onsite as possible will reduce the overall cost to you. 

NO backtracking -  This plan should reduce the amount of back tracking you do in creating the garden and reduce the amount of waste you have to remove. 

THINKs about Future - A master plan will also consider how you want the garden to look in the years to come.  The use of the garden over time will change especially if you have children.  Gardens can always be modified accordingly.

By having a plan of your garden your garden will develop to a plan far into the future rather than being planted out haphazardly.

 

As Glenice mentioned in the early part of the series, you don’t have to do it all at once, but it can be a plan that you work through gradually.

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Real World Gardener Preserving Historic Gardens

April 26th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

FEATURE INTERVIEW

Sydney living museums curator Scott Hill

As part of our heritage, historic buildings and gardens offer us an insight into the styles and features of certain periods, reflecting the Australian architecture of the day.

The grounds of some old estates are important not just for their design value but they may also have surviving locally native species such as eucalyptus and turpentine trees.

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Ancient Champion trees.



Many historic gardens feature mature trees planted as avenues, border plantings or specimens.

The character of the gardens may even be defined by such trees so it's important to keep them in good health. In heritage English gardens, old trees in excess of 300 years are called 'champion trees."

Historic houses and their gardens also have an aesthetic value and, can be a green oasis in a town or community, providing a space to relax, and hold events.

 

Gardens and grounds may be important both in themselves and as settings for heritage buildings.

Because landscape elements alter with the seasons and with the passing years, historians need to allow time to properly assess these landscapes.

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Vegetable gardens are also important elements in an historic garden photo M Cannon

This continual change also means that looking after such a garden must be done with caution.

Records of the house and garden are important references to help with this maintenance process..

The Historic Houses Association of Australia Inc. is a registered charity and volunteer organisation that promotes public interest in historic houses and properties. Members are able to visit historic houses and other places - both publicly and privately owned - to meet historians, heritage architects and private owners and to learn about the history of each property and its early occupants and collections.

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Real World Gardener Chrysanthemum Belgian Hybrid is Plant of the Week

April 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith www.hortjournal.com.au

 

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From tiny pompoms to huge balls in shades of bronze, purple, orange, red and yellow, the ubiquitous chrysanthemum is an autumn garden's saving grace.

A member of the Asteraceae family, the chrysanthemum is native to China and was introduced to Europe in 1688.

Are you buying the right ‘mums’ for your garden?

 

Chrysanthemums are photoperiodic, meaning they naturally flower in response to short days and long nights—in other words, in the Autumn, they start to flower five to seven weeks after short days begin.

Belgian mums produce so many flower buds that if you tried to count them on these plants, you most likely would need a calculator.

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Many have upwards of 600 buds ready to open.

Plus an exceptional feature of the Belgian mum is its durability.

Chrysanthemums come in thousands of colours, flower shapes and sizes, not just pink.

If you want to have the really large flowers you need to disbud them.

Put simply, that means at the bud stage, remove all but one bud that are growing in a cluster. This is similar to disbudding in camellia flowers.

That way, all the energy of the plant is put into those single buds giving you a large bloom.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Chrysanthemum Belgian Hybrid is Plant of the Week

April 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith www.hortjournal.com.au

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com

From tiny pompoms to huge balls in shades of bronze, purple, orange, red and yellow, the ubiquitous chrysanthemum is an autumn garden's saving grace.

A member of the Asteraceae family, the chrysanthemum is native to China and was introduced to Europe in 1688.

Are you buying the right ‘mums’ for your garden?

 

Chrysanthemums are photoperiodic, meaning they naturally flower in response to short days and long nights—in other words, in the Autumn, they start to flower five to seven weeks after short days begin.

Belgian mums produce so many flower buds that if you tried to count them on these plants, you most likely would need a calculator.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com

Many have upwards of 600 buds ready to open.

Plus an exceptional feature of the Belgian mum is its durability.

Chrysanthemums come in thousands of colours, flower shapes and sizes, not just pink.

If you want to have the really large flowers you need to disbud them.

Put simply, that means at the bud stage, remove all but one bud that are growing in a cluster. This is similar to disbudding in camellia flowers.

That way, all the energy of the plant is put into those single buds giving you a large bloom.

 

 

Real World Gardener Concept Plans in Design Elements

April 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with Glenice Buck from www.glenicbuckdesigns.com.au

Whether it’s a new garden or existing one, great gardens start with great design.

Having a professional garden design ensures continuity and cohesiveness throughout a property.

Home owners who want to redesign their gardens, can save both time and money by calling in a garden designer, who will plan the space according to your requirements and the limitations of the site.

Aspects such as climate, maintenance requirements, and full-growth sizing are all things that experienced landscaping designers take into consideration.

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Without asking anymore questions

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.comConcept plans include overall plans of the garden, images of key design elements and notes on plants and materials. It provides clients with a visual image of the new garden.

 

This plan demonstrates the layout of the garden in broader brushstrokes.

It shows the general layout of the hard landscaping and the garden beds and explores opportunities for resolving the design. 

The concept plan also offers additional notes and images to help you, the gardener or client to visualise the garden design concept.

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Real World Gardener Growing Capers in Spice it Up

April 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

Most spices and herbs come from the leaves or bark of a plant, but what about the flower?



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Capers-Caparis spinosa photo M Cannon



Yes we can put Nasturtium and borage flowers in our salads but these only impart a small amount of flavour compared to this next spice.

 

Well capers that you might buy in the supermarket look like little green soft fruits that sometimes come in a brine and sometimes are packed in pure salt in jars.

 

Capers or Caparis spinosa, is actually a bush which is called caper bush.

Caper bush plants are readily available and grow as a hardy shrub originating in the Mediterranean, the Middle East and Northern Africa.

If your district you can grow olives, grapes, almonds, and pistachios, then you can also grow capers.

Have you ever eaten Spaghetti alla Puttanesca,- that’s chockers with capers, what about Penne with anchovies, capers and toasty crumbs?

Ever heard of caper butter on crusty bread with vegetables and meats, or used in stuffing for fish?

Did you know that there are about 20 native caper species in Australia, some of which are trees?

However, the traditional caper comes from the Mediterranean region, and parts of the Middle East.

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Caper bush photo M Cannon

Think hot and dry and arid for the natural conditions that this plant grows in if you’re thinking of growing a caper bush yourself.

 

The bush itself only grows to a metre, and it’s a pretty tough plant needing no extra water after it’s established.

Capers are as dry tolerant as Eucalypts and Wattle trees because like gum trees and wattles, capers have a deep tap root that can search for water as well as a surface root system that picks up the morning dew.

Well drained soil is the best kind for this bush and adding good compost and lime to the soil will also help the caper bush along.

Although capers love hot temperatures, frost is no problem.

The flowers are white with long purple stamens and usually only lasts for one day.

But if you want to use them in cooking, capers need to be picked when the bud is still tight.

You’ll get buds every couple of weeks during the warmest months.

If you have any questions about growing or buying caper bush plants, write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Sunpatiens are Plane of the Week

April 12th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 

WITH Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor www.hortjournal.com.au

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.comA friend of mine was keen on planting New Guinea impatiens –the dark leaved ones with one flowers every year.

But over the last few years he found that the ones he bought, turned to mush because of a prevalent fungal disease that these plants became prone to.

 

The disease was downy mildew and for a few years, nurseries stopped stocking these plants because the disease had become such a problem.

It just wasn’t worth their while trying to grow plants that would always develop the disease.

Now there’s an alternative variety that looks the same, flowers much better and doesn’t have disease problems.

Listen to the podcast to find out more

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.comAs Karen mentioned, the old fashioned impatiens were Impatiens wallerana, but these sun hardy impatiens are Impatiens hawkeri- so a different species, but still impatiens.

SunPatiens provide three times as much coverage and colour as standard bedding plants in the same space, so you save money.

SunPatiens thrive in full sun and shade, so you don’t have to worry where to plant them.

A single planting provides three seasons of colour with NO maintenance besides regular watering.

SunPatiens are unaffected by Downy Mildew so are a natural choice for colour in shady areas

Strong roots develop fast so plants are quick to grow and fill in.

Strong, weather-tolerant plants hold up to wind and rain.

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Real World Gardener Sunpatiens are Plane of the Week

April 12th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 

WITH Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith editor www.hortjournal.com.au

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.comA friend of mine was keen on planting New Guinea impatiens –the dark leaved ones with one flowers every year.

But over the last few years he found that the ones he bought, turned to mush because of a prevalent fungal disease that these plants became prone to.

 

The disease was downy mildew and for a few years, nurseries stopped stocking these plants because the disease had become such a problem.

It just wasn’t worth their while trying to grow plants that would always develop the disease.

Now there’s an alternative variety that looks the same, flowers much better and doesn’t have disease problems.

Listen to the podcast to find out more

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.comAs Karen mentioned, the old fashioned impatiens were Impatiens wallerana, but these sun hardy impatiens are Impatiens hawkeri- so a different species, but still impatiens.

SunPatiens provide three times as much coverage and colour as standard bedding plants in the same space, so you save money.

SunPatiens thrive in full sun and shade, so you don’t have to worry where to plant them.

A single planting provides three seasons of colour with NO maintenance besides regular watering.

SunPatiens are unaffected by Downy Mildew so are a natural choice for colour in shady areas

Strong roots develop fast so plants are quick to grow and fill in.

Strong, weather-tolerant plants hold up to wind and rain.

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Real World Gardener The Design Process part 2 Analaysis

April 12th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Glenice Buck www.glenicebuckdesigns.com.au

If you were asked to analyse the site of your garden where would you start?

Would you simply make a list of all the greenery, or would you include the rocks, paths, and any ponds or ornaments?

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Analysing your site photo M Cannon

 What about a site survey indicating the lay of the land, actual size of your block? Would you include that?

Without asking anymore questions

Listen to the podcast to find out more.

An inventory and analysis of your yard is important for making design decisions and developing the best design for you.



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photo M Cannon



The difference between an inventory and an analysis, is that the inventory is simply a list of all existing conditions, like plants, paths, ornaments etc, and the analysis is a judgment about the condition plus what you would like to achieve in your desired design.

In an analysis, natural features of the site are recorded such as soil type, sun exposure, climate, wind conditions, existing plants, slope, and elevation or grade changes.

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