Real World Gardener New Brachyscome is Plant of the Week

March 29th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 with Jeremy Critchley owner www.thegreengallery.com.au
and Karen Smith editor of www.hortjournal.com.au

Brachyscome multifida is plant of the week.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.comBrachyscome or cut-leafed daisy, is a perennial plant found in the grassy understories of woodlands and open forests. Naturally found in the temperate areas of southern Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

Breeders are constantly finding new cultivars that suit that home garden better than the species variety found naturally.

 

If you heard the names Mauve delight, Radiant Magenta, Verassco Violet, and Jumbo Tricolour.

What could I be talking about other than a plant?

This time a native plant for our gardens but before you say, I’ve tried native plants and they just don’t work in my garden.

Yes, I’ve been there too, but with new varieties coming through all the time that have been bred specifically for home garden conditions, what’s the harm of trying those too?

Let’s find out about some more…..

PLAY: Brachyscome_25th March_2015

Mauve Delight Brachyscome does take hard frosts and in fact if the plant shoots from underground, they seem to survive frosts, although the top part may get burnt off by the frost.

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Its trailing habit makes it perfect for use in hanging baskets, containers or as a small area ground cover.

The Cut-Leafed Daisy grows best in a full sun position but can tolerate part shade and it grows on a range of soil types including heavy clays and light-sandy loams.

It doesn't need much extra watering, but in the drier months it would need a supplementary water.

The only problem Brachyscome get is if the leaves are consistently wet, powdery mildew can be a problem.

 

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Real World Gardener Rooftop Gardnes Part 3 in Desgin Elements

March 29th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 DESIGN ELEMENTS

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.comwith Christopher Owen, Landscape Designer
Rooftop gardens can work and are something you might want to think about if you only got a small amount of land on which to garden.

But what plants survive on a rooftop garden? What climate factors will impact most on those plants that you choose?

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You might not know that Switzerland has recently passed a bylaw which states that new buildings must be designed to relocate the green space covered by the building's footprint to their roofs - even existing buildings -including historical buildings - must now green 20% of their rooftops. This has created an increased demand for research and material/product design.

Green roofs are a huge investment, especially financially.

But research shows that the benefits outweigh the cost.

Not only do green roofs help to combat the urban heat island effect, they’re energy-efficient and can be quite useful, particularly if they include vegetable gardens and fruit trees.

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Real World Gardener Why Have Historic Gardens

March 29th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

FEATURE INTERVIEW

with Curator Rouse Hill Historic House, Scott Hill



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Rouse Hill Historic Home photo Louise Brooks



There’s no doubt that England, and quite a few countries in the European Union have very old historic gardens compared to Australian historic gardens.

Even so, Australia does have some important gardens that are in need of restoration or reconstruction to bring them back to their original condition.

Gardens are part of our history and give us a window into the past, and once lost are impossible to replace.

People tend to think of heritage gardens as being old, but they can be anything from a couple of decades old to centuries old.

Heritage value also doesn't rely on the person that lived there.

Some styles have heritage values, such as "gardenesque" which was from the 1830's to the end of the 19th century. "Gardenesque" embodied a particular planting style and sought to bring out botanic values of plants.

Let’s find out more about why have historic gardens and the issued in looking after them.

Historic garden restoration and maintenance is an important issue worldwide.



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Rouse Hill Historic House photo Louise Brooks

The restoration of heritage gardens whether they be community or private gardens, can be looked at as cultural or community assets.

Some need to be restored and all require maintenance in a sensitive way that reflects their historical significance.

Inside these historic gardens there can exist trees of a great age, old-fashioned plants, rare specimens, paths, edging and seating.

If you have any questions about historic gardens or have a photo of a historic garden you want to share, send it in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Calibrachoa is Plant of the Week

March 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, owner of www.greengallery.com.au

CALIBRACHOA

Do you like Petunias but they grow too lanky for you and you keep forgetting to pinch of the dead flowers so new flowers can grow?

This plant of the week is like a petunia on steroids but with smaller flowers that are self-cleaning flowers. 

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Calibrachoa Aloha Sweet Cherry, photo Jeremy Critchley

 

Yep, when the flowers finish they fall off themselves.

With trade names like Superbells, million bells, cherry chimes – this plant sounds like it’s something you need to have at least one of in your garden.

Calibrachoa is a genus of plants in the Solanaceae (nightshade) family.

They are evergreen short-lived perennials and subshrubs with a sprawling habit, with small petunia-type flowers.

In fact they’re closely related to Petunias.

These flowers are native to South America as are petunias; mainly from southern Brazil across to Peru and Chile, growing in scrub and open grassland.

While Calibrachoa ‘million bells’ ‘cherry bells’ and so on, might be a fairly new species, this dazzling little plant is a must-have in the garden.

Its name comes from the fact that it has hundreds of small, bell-like flowers which look like miniature petunias.

Its trailing habit makes it perfect for use in hanging baskets, containers or as a small area ground cover.

Flowering -Early spring to late autumn in warmer climates.

 

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Real World Gardener Rooftop Gardens part 2 in Design Elements

March 22nd, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

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Rooftop gardens in Granada, Spain. photo M Cannon

with landscape designer Christopher Owen
Rooftop Gardens-pt2

So you want a rooftop garden maybe on your garage or on your house even, because it’s got a flat roof.

What practical considerations are involved?

What materials will be right for up there for your plants to grow in?

What plants won’t work up there?

Let’s find out some more….

There are all sorts of products like drainage cell instead that you can use instead of the heavier aggregate that you would normally use in a raised garden bed.

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Irrigation and taking the water off the roof when there’s too much is of utmost importance.

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Real World Gardener Make Your Own Mustard in Spice it Up

March 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

Have you ever wonder why how to make mustard from mustard seeds?



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Black and yellow mustard seeds



If not and you eat mustard, you might be surprised to learn that you can make one of your own whole grain mustard.

Not only is it easy and cheap, but you can play around with different flavours and make yourself a gourmet mustard.

There are three types of mustard seed-brown (Brassica juncea) , white (Brassica alba is actually yellow) and black-(Brassica nigra.)

Brown and yellow are normally used for culinary use.

The heat in mustard is released on activation of enzymes which create the myrosinase.

When you fry mustard seeds until they pop, the enzymes are killed off.

Useful for cooking without the heat of mustard but just the nutty flavour.

 

To make your own wholegrain mustard.

Step 1: Soak the mustard seeds (yellow or brown seeds) in cold water to activate the enzyme.

Step 2 : After 15-20 minutes add vinegar which will stop the enzyme reaction.

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Mustard seed mixture and red wine vinegar about to be added

Step 3: Give this mixture a little bit of a grind with a mortar and pestle-just enough to crack the seeds so they take up the moisture.

Step 4.Add dried herbs, or chilli

Step 5: Let that set for a few weeks for the flavour to develop.

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Step 2 alternative-white wine vinegar or verjuice are alternatives to  plain white vinegar.

 

You can buy "make your own mustard" mix from Herbies Spices in Rozelle.

This mix is what I used and contains brown and yellow mustard seedsm green peppercorns, allspice, tarragon, sugar, ajowan seeds and salt.

It's already been pre-cracked so the vinegar gets soaked up immediately.

 Alternatively you grow Brassica juncea in your home garden. These are mustard greens and have plenty of heat in the leaf to give you quite a bit of punch on your ham sandwich.

A mustard stone mill is out of the reach of the domestic market so don't be disappointed if you like the smooth mustards, because you won’t be able to get it quite as smooth as the ones you can buy off the shelf.

It will still be pretty good because you made it yourself.

There’ll be a little graininess still left.

If you have any questions about cleaning your garden tools or a photo of some tools that you want help with, send it in to   2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Rooftop Gardens part 1 Design Elements

March 15th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website

www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with Chris Owen, Landscape Designer.

Rooftop Gardens part1.

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Modern building disguised at Alhambra Palace, Granada, Spain. photo M Cannon

You might find this hard to believe but in ancient Mesopotamia (4th millennium BC–600 BC) the citizens had plantings of trees and shrubs on aboveground terraces.

Also during Roman times - the Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii, had an elevated terrace where plants were grown.

What’s more, a roof garden has also been discovered around an audience hall in Roman-Byzantine Caesarea.

So, for something completely different I’m starting a series on rooftop gardens



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Rooftop gardens_Alhambra Palace, Granada photo M Cannon




A roof garden is a garden on the roof of a building.

Besides the decorative benefit, roof plantings can give you food, temperature control, look great, provide habitats or corridors for wildlife, and in large scale it may even have ecological benefits.

Did you know that the practice of cultivating food on the rooftop of buildings is sometimes referred to as rooftop farming? Rooftop farming is usually done using green roof, hydroponics, aeroponics or air-dynaponics systems or container gardens.

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Real World Gardener Angelonia Archangel is Plant of the Week

March 15th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website

www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Jeremy Critchley from www.thegreengallery.com.au and Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal magazine. www.hortjournal.com.au

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Ever heard of summer snapdragons?

If you haven’t you’ll be surprised to know that there is such a plant that has flowers that look like small snapdragons. Not only that, they appear on a small bushy plant all summer long and into autumn, plus they’re scented.

Did you know that Angelonias weren’t well known in the gardening scene until the late 1990s?

Luckily, breeders and plant development companies saw that they had great potential and started producing Angelonias that were shorter and heavy-flowering.

Angelonias are easy to grow and can stand hot days and humidity which normal snapdragons can’t.

Flowering: Summer, Late Summer.  

The biggest flowers for big visual impact, even from a distance!

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.comAngelonia Archangel has the most generous blooms, vibrant colors, glossy dark green foliage with a robust, well-branched habit, delivering big Summer impact.

 Angelonia Archangel is not your average Angelonia, it has flowers that are three times larger than other varieties and thrives in extreme heat, humidity and drought.An excellent container or bedding plant and creates a striking display for landscapes.

Worth a try.

 

 

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Real World Gardener Aphids part2 in Plant Doctor

March 13th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website

www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

with Steve Falcioni, GM of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Probably one of the first pests that you’ll learn to identify is aphids.



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aphids come in yellow, green, black and brown



Just by looking at how many there are, you’ll be left in no doubt that aphids are pests and not beneficial or good bugs.

In the warmer months they seem to get around in their hundreds and at this time of year, the good bugs will need a helping hand.

But not with something that will harm them.

 Surprisingly, aphids can travel in on the wind.

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Just in case you weren’t sure what an aphid looks like, Aphids are small, soft-bodied insects with long slender mouthparts that they use to pierce stems, leaves, and other softer plant parts to suck out fluids.

They have soft pear-shaped bodies with long legs and antennae and may be green, yellow, brown, red, or black depending on the species and the plants they feed on.

 

A few types of aphids have a waxy or woolly appearance because of a waxy white or grey secretion over their body surface.

Did you know that almost every plant has one or more types of aphid that occasionally feed on it?

 



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lacewing larvae



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ladybird larvae



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spend a bit of time getting to know the good bugs in your garden. Turn over leaves to check for ladybird and lacewing larvae.

Seems like Neem oil and botanical oils are the safest bet to use in your garden because it does the least harm to beneficial insects.

If you have any questions about aphids or a photo of a sick plant that you want diagnosed, send it in to  2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener New Tuberous Begonias are Plant of the Week

March 6th, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with owner The Green Gallery Nursery Jeremy Critchley and Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au

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photo Jeremy Critchley-The Green Gallery Nursery

You probably like rose and camellia flowers, but what about a plant which has flowers that look like both of these plants?

Rose form or camellia flowered begonia.

The large double flowers have rounded petals and a rosebud- like centre giving them a more formal look.

These plants can also have ruffled flowers tuberous that have serrated, scalloped or heavily-waved petals.

Some of these look like large carnations and some also have a rosebud centre.

 

Tuberous Begonias are a cool climate plant, not sub-tropical.

 People grow them well in Sydney, Perth and south of these areas.

 

Most begonias prefer warm, moist conditions. The ideal temperature range is 150 to 260 Celsius though most will tolerate range is 150 to 26 0C and some will tolerate temperatures as high as 400C and as low as 50C - some even lower.

All begonias prefer well drained soil rich in compost or organic matter and some like some degree of shade

 

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Tuberous Begonias photo J Critchley The Green Gallery Nursery

 If you’re unsure, it is best to try cheaper bedding begonias first, then progress to more showy large flowered plants.

Choose a place where plants like ferns, fuchsias, hostas or cymbidiums grow.

 Give them good light, but not direct sun (shade cloth ideal).

 Not too much wind.

 Not indoors – Tuberous Begonias need cool nights.

Their active growth stage is between October and May.

When the Begonia is dormant in winter, it’s best to lay the pot on its side to keep the pot dry.

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