Real World Gardener Hen and Chicken Fern is Plant of the Week

February 22nd, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith from www.hortjournal.com.au

Do you have enough ferns in your garden filling out the shady damp places?

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com
Fernery, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. photo M Cannon

It’s amazing how some ferns spring up out of nowhere it places where you’d think it was impossible to grow ferns.

I have maiden hair ferns sprouting out of the bottom of a sandstone retaining wall and surviving without any care at all.

Hen and chicken fern, is another one that’s easy to grow and has an really interesting way of growing.

Asplenium bulbiferum, or Hen and Chicken fern,   is native to Australia and New Zealand.

 In nature, native ferns usually are usually found growing in the damp, dim places that frogs would like to call home.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com

They will grow well outdoors in any shady area, as long as they have enough moisture and are protected from drying winds.

Use them as ground covers or accents in shady areas or along a north-facing wall or fence.

 

 

It's called a 'hen and chicken' fern because it grows small bulbils on the top of its fronds.  Once these bulbils grow to about 5 cm (or are carrying three of four miniature fronds, they can be easily detached between the finger and thumb and then planted in small pots.), these offspring will fall off of the main plant (or they can be removed carefully and planted) and provided that the soil they land in is kept moist, they’ll develop a small root system and then start to grow on into a new ferns.  In 3 to 6 months they will have developed a good sturdy root system and will be ready to pot on to the next size. Much easier than propagating using the spore method.

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Vertical Gardens in Design Elements part 1

February 22nd, 2015

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Jason Cornish

Are they really all that they are cracked up to be-a panacea for gardens short on space?Or, are they instead something that is a drain on the pocket, and out time to keep them looking good. We examnine the pitfalls in part 1 of a 2 part look at vertical gardens.

But just what is a vertical garden and how do you make one and what are the pitfalls?

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com
Venlo, Netherlands photo M Cannon

Whether you’re short on space in the garden or you have a wall or fence that could do with some greenery, vertical gardens could be the answer.

Vertical gardens sound impressive and difficult, and some of us have been procrastinating months if not years about building one.

 

Jason doesn’t beat around the bush and over the next two weeks we’ll be going through ways you can build a vertical garden and the pros and cons of having one.

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Rose Scale in Plant Doctor

February 22nd, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

with Steve Falcioni general manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

As flowers go, roses are probably the most popular garden plant and cut flower.

Who doesn’t like receiving a bunch of roses?

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com
Rosa Cornelius photo M Cannon

As gardeners and horticulturalists go, growing roses can be problematic if you’re trying to grow them out of their comfort zone.

The wrong spot or climate can make some problems seem hard to eradicate.

The scale itself is 203mm big, roughly circular and off white in colour. Rose scale stands out against the brown stems and can get a complete covering of the stem.

If you’ve only got one rose in a pot, then scrubbing off the scale with soapy water is probably all you need to do but you may not get all the crawlers and the problem will persist.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com
Rose scale

Or if you find a stem that’s just covered with so much scale that it’s practically white-get out the scrubbing brush or just prune it off.

Certainly a good scrub can break through all the layers if it's badly infested but then treat with eco Oil.

Otherwise, applying horticultural oil based on botanical oil is the best treatment for rose scale because it does the least harm to beneficial insects.

Also botanically based oils can be sprayed onto plants at higher day temperatures- up to 350 C

If you have any questions about scale or rose scale or a photo of a plant you want diagnosed, send it in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Moorish Garden Design

February 14th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Lesley Simpson



proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com

Royal Palace Seville photo M Cannon



When you think of oriental gardens, do you think of a quiet peaceful place where you can sit and meditate?

Where does the term Moorish garden or the Moors come from?

Back in Spain during the 8th century until the 14th century, the Arabs that invaded, conquered and ruled Spain, were referred to as Moors.

The oldest preserved Moorish garden is the palace in Grenada in south of Spain.

You need to book well ahead to visit that particular garden.

Instead of all that-

 

Moorish gardens always have a water feature and a courtyard or patio.

These gardens always seem to include mandarins, cypresses, oranges and oleanders.

If you have any questions about how to create a  moorish garden why not write in?

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Pimelea Sunset Blush is Plant of the Week

February 14th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Hort Journal Editor Karen Smith

Pimelia linifolia and Pimelea "Sunset Blush."

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com
Pimelea linifolia photo M Cannon

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com

 

If you like native flowers, you’ll like this delicate pom pom style of flower that cluster together like smaller versions of Hydrangea flowers.

The flowers always stand out against the dark green leaves.

Only a small perennial plant that can be grown in pots, small courtyards or patios.

Pimelea ferruginea-The "pink rice flower" is a low, densely growing shrub to 1 metre x 1-2 metres in width.

It will grow in a range of soil types as long as the drainage is reasonable. The plant is well suited to coastal gardens and will grow in full sun or partial shade.

Pimelea-the species does best in temperate, and cool temperate and coastal areas, not liking humidity that much.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Spice It Up with Fennel

February 14th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

 

Fennel has its origins in the Mediterranean but today it's often thought of as a weed.

Fennel is sometimes sold as "Aniseed Plant," which although it has a faint aroma of aniseed because it contains anethole, it's not aniseed.

 

Did you know that Fennel seeds were used by Romans as far back as 750 AD?

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com
Fennel Seeds

Remember, a spice comes from the seeds and the herb from the leaves.

Also in this case, you can buy Fennel Pollen which is the fennel flowers with the pollen.

The flavour is delicate but with a distinct fennel aroma. Chefs sprinkle it on desserts.

 

You can grow Florence fennel at this time of year in pretty much all of Australia. February and March seem to be the best time.

This veggie has a pale whitish green bulb with that has small shoots topped with ferny leaves.

The bulb can be used in lasagne,  shaved into salads in stir fries and has a pleasant aniseedy taste-not overpowering at all.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com
Florence Fennel bulbs

The leaves of course can be used as a garnish in lots of things as well.

Plants grow to about 60cm and need plenty of water and nutrients to stop them from going to seed.

If you want the seed, best buy it from a reputable source like Herbies Spices, so you know it doesn't contain rat droppings.

If you have any questions about growing fennel or a photo of your veggie bed, send it in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Echinacea is Plant of the Week

February 7th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith editor Hort Journal magazine. www.hortjournal.com.au

 

Echinacea purpurea has been in cultivation a long time but, over the past 10 years, a whole range of new varieties has appeared, with breeders here, in Holland and in the United States churning out new variants as fast as they can.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com

Echinaceas are perennials, but not all perennials last forever. You’re doing well if you can get your Cone flowers to last 5 years, but often it’s a bit less.

 

If you want to add height to your garden border but also want cut flowers and flowers that attract bees and butterflies, you can’t go past this next perennial.

What’s more it’s pretty easy to grow from seed and the flowers last for about a month in your garden bed. So there’s plenty of cost savings to be had.

Let’s find out about this plant.

PLAY:Echinacea_4th February_2015

Did you know that in America before white settlers, Echinacea root was used as a remedy for snake bite, the Cheyenne tribe chewed the root to quench thirst, and another tribe washed their hands in a decoction of echinacea to increase their tolerance of heat.

 

European settlers learned of the North American herb's many uses, and soon lots of  echinacea-based remedies were commercially available from pharmaceutical companies in the United States.

 

New colours and hybrids are because of crossing E. purpurea with other echinacea species. For those for whom the simple pink daisy of E. purpurea, with its slightly reflexed petals, does not offer enough excitement, there are lots of other colours: white, salmon-apricot shades, yellows, greens (yes, really); and different shapes: doubles, reflexed petals, petals with frills, fluffy central cones.

BOTANICAL BITE

Like all daisies, echinaceas are composite flowers – that chunky central cone (which gives rise to the name “coneflower”) is actually a mass of tiny fertile flowers(technically-disc florets), which bees and butterflies home in on to collect nectar.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com

 

Those big showy “petals” are actually sterile flowers (technically “ray florets”) that advertise the flower to passing pollinators. Once fertilised, these outer florets fall off and the cone turns into a seedhead.

Echinaceas are extremely frost hardy so it’s not the  cold that knocks them off, but “they appear to be competition-intolerant; they grow well on their own, but suffer if other plants crowd them.”

So says one expert, another says might be winter damp… a plant which habitually goes into a deep-freeze winter just goes dormant… warm and moist conditions encourage pathogens, so echinaceas might rot easily in our mild, wet winters.”

What’s good about the plant-you can grow them easily from seed, not the hybrids of course, but the straight species. The seed doesn’t even have to be fresh.

I’ve sown an out of date packet 2009, and they all came up.

At around (80-100cm) in height, echinaceas are quite big plants.

If you’re prepared to pay for perennials that are potted up, there are dwarf varieties such as ‘Kim’s Knee High’ but because it’s smaller it has lots of smaller flowers on 60cm-high plant; ‘Kim’s Mop Head’ is similar in size, with white flowers

How to grow _Echinaceas need full sun and fertile, well-drained soil.

Avoid damp spots and heavy mulching over crowns in winter.

Deadhead to encourage flowering into the autumn after the main August-September season.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com

Once planted, they are best left alone — they do not transplant well.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Echinacea is Plant of the Week

February 7th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

with Karen Smith editor Hort Journal magazine. www.hortjournal.com.au

 

Echinacea purpurea has been in cultivation a long time but, over the past 10 years, a whole range of new varieties has appeared, with breeders here, in Holland and in the United States churning out new variants as fast as they can.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com

Echinaceas are perennials, but not all perennials last forever. You’re doing well if you can get your Cone flowers to last 5 years, but often it’s a bit less.

 

If you want to add height to your garden border but also want cut flowers and flowers that attract bees and butterflies, you can’t go past this next perennial.

What’s more it’s pretty easy to grow from seed and the flowers last for about a month in your garden bed. So there’s plenty of cost savings to be had.

Let’s find out about this plant.

PLAY:Echinacea_4th February_2015

Did you know that in America before white settlers, Echinacea root was used as a remedy for snake bite, the Cheyenne tribe chewed the root to quench thirst, and another tribe washed their hands in a decoction of echinacea to increase their tolerance of heat.

 

European settlers learned of the North American herb's many uses, and soon lots of  echinacea-based remedies were commercially available from pharmaceutical companies in the United States.

 

New colours and hybrids are because of crossing E. purpurea with other echinacea species. For those for whom the simple pink daisy of E. purpurea, with its slightly reflexed petals, does not offer enough excitement, there are lots of other colours: white, salmon-apricot shades, yellows, greens (yes, really); and different shapes: doubles, reflexed petals, petals with frills, fluffy central cones.

BOTANICAL BITE

Like all daisies, echinaceas are composite flowers – that chunky central cone (which gives rise to the name “coneflower”) is actually a mass of tiny fertile flowers(technically-disc florets), which bees and butterflies home in on to collect nectar.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.com

 

Those big showy “petals” are actually sterile flowers (technically “ray florets”) that advertise the flower to passing pollinators. Once fertilised, these outer florets fall off and the cone turns into a seedhead.

Echinaceas are extremely frost hardy so it’s not the  cold that knocks them off, but “they appear to be competition-intolerant; they grow well on their own, but suffer if other plants crowd them.”

So says one expert, another says might be winter damp… a plant which habitually goes into a deep-freeze winter just goes dormant… warm and moist conditions encourage pathogens, so echinaceas might rot easily in our mild, wet winters.”

What’s good about the plant-you can grow them easily from seed, not the hybrids of course, but the straight species. The seed doesn’t even have to be fresh.

I’ve sown an out of date packet 2009, and they all came up.

At around (80-100cm) in height, echinaceas are quite big plants.

If you’re prepared to pay for perennials that are potted up, there are dwarf varieties such as ‘Kim’s Knee High’ but because it’s smaller it has lots of smaller flowers on 60cm-high plant; ‘Kim’s Mop Head’ is similar in size, with white flowers

How to grow _Echinaceas need full sun and fertile, well-drained soil.

Avoid damp spots and heavy mulching over crowns in winter.

Deadhead to encourage flowering into the autumn after the main August-September season.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com

Once planted, they are best left alone — they do not transplant well.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Oriental Themes in Design Elements

February 7th, 2015

 REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with garden designer Lesley Simpson.

An oriental garden can be many things-Japanese, Chinese, or Zen.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com

When you think of oriental gardens, do you think of a quiet peaceful place where you can sit and meditate?

Seems to be a key ingredient-quiet contemplation.

If you want on oriental theme then your garden, whether it’s Chinese or Japanese needs to reflect nature.

So how do you achieve that in a garden? Listen to the podcast?

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com

You can create your oriental garden on a small scale; rocks represent mountains or islands, sand or gravel can represent water, and paths represent your journey through life. Symbolism in the garden is an important part of design."

Also the water feature is very prominent but it doesn’t have to be a waterfall as much as we would like one, it’s probably beyond most of our means.

Perhaps a small bowl that has a little bubbler in it will do the trick?

What do you think?

 

 

 

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Blossom End Rot in Plant Doctor

February 7th, 2015

  REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

Real World Gardener is funded by the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

with Steve Falcioni from www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

 

Deficiencies in plants are hard to diagnose especially if it’s in the leaf.

Sometimes though they stick out like a sore thumb, particularly on some veggies like tomatoes.

Other times with other vegetables, it’s a bit confusing because it could fungal, or you didn’t fertilise or water enough.

The problem will show up when the fruit is about half-size or half ripe with zucchinis.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com

With tomatoes, they'll still be green when you start to see the blackness on the bottom end of the tomato.

Too much or too little water can mean the plant can't take up calcium, even more so if you've used artificial fertilisers.

The artificial fertilisers include those powders that you mix with water. These sodium and nitrate ions which mean the plant prioritises take up other nutrients at the expense of calcium.

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.comLack of calcium is most likely the cause if the problem shows up when the fruit is bigger-almost half ripened.

Calcium deficiency is treatable but it won’t reverse the problem you’re seeing on your vegetables right now.

So those veggies that have got it now-you’re stuck with.

I have read about crushing egg shells and mixing them into the soil to correct calcium deficiency, but that takes months and months before the calcium is available to the plants. Just not worth it.

If you apply gypsum in a liquid form, it gets absorbed quicker and may just fix the problem on your zucchinis on tomatoes in as little as a couple of weeks.

Gypsum is calcium plus sulphur, which doesn't change soil pH.

Otherwise, applying the powder form of gypsum takes at least a season to work it’ way into the soil.

If you have any questions about blossom end rot or a photo of a sad veggie you want diagnosed, send it in to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

00:0000:00

- Older Posts »