Real World Gardener Design Elements and Plants That Don’t Grow At Your Place

August 31st, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid

 

It doesn’t matter if you’re an avid gardener, amateur gardener, organic gardener or just a keen gardener we’ve all asked the question at one point.

Why doesn’t it grow at my place?

You might know someone that has a plant you love – they live nearby – or you see something in a garden not far from you – but you’ve tried it at home and it just doesn’t work. What’s going on?

There’s a few things it could be. One is the aspect. Whatever the plants position, it really likes it if it’s thriving. It might be sun, or part shade – morning sun with afternoon shade. There might be something specific about how much sun and shade it gets that suits it down to the ground!

Some plants are very specific as to what they like to grow really well, and it’s these plants that we spend time trying to work out what’s going wrong.

A friend complained that no matter what she did to her passionfruit vine, it just wouldn't grow.

Yet, her sister who lived two doors down the road, had a beautiful and bountiful passionfruit vine.

Same soil, same climate, so what could be the problem?

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Sometimes you might hear as “apply seaweed solution” to such and such a problem as a sort of fix all.

In some cases it seems to work but all we’ve done is started watering the plant and it’s responded.

Generally you have to look a bit further under the top layer of soil, or around the plant’s environment.

At the end of the day, if it’s not working for you, I know this is hard, you need to pull out the difficult plant start again with something else.

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Real World Plant Doctor is Treating Azalea Lace Bugs

August 31st, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

 with Steve Falcioni, general manager of www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F2.bp.blogspot.comproxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.comDo some of your plants have silver looking leaves when before, they used to be green?

 

In most cases the green has completely disappeared from the leaf and you’re left with a leaf that looks a silvery bronze with blackish veins.

 

 

You can ignore it and wait for new leaves to appear, but in the meantime your plant is struggling to grow because the leaves now lack chlorophyll.

That’s the green stuff plants need to carry out photosynthesis.

Plant doctor is on the case today and we're treating Azalea Lace Bug.

Let’s find out what we can do out this problem….

 

proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.comThe Azalea Lace Bug (Stephanitis pyrioides), an insect originating from Japan, is a signicant pest of azaleas and rhododendrons in many regions of the world where these plants are cultivated.

 

The bug especially attacks plants growing in sunny, exposed situations.

 

Of course once you get that particular problem in your garden, the lace bugs then moves onto other plants in more shady parts of the garden as well.

 

If you don’t like spraying those plants even with organic controls, then you need to pull those plants out and put in something else that doesn’t need spraying.If you have any questions about Azalea lace bug or any bugs, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Plants That Do Not Last in Design Elements

August 25th, 2014

 

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

 

 

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DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid

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This is the third in the series of “why won’t it grow at my place.”

Do all plants have a long and healthy life and is it your fault when they keel over?

That’s been a question for most gardeners perhaps some of the time.

What can go wrong is not so much the plant’s health but it’s life span. Not all plants live forever and that includes trees and shrubs not just perennials.

The climatic conditions at your place might also be a factor in shortening the life span of some of your plants even though you’ve given it all that TLC-like watering, fertilizing, pruning at the right time.

 

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Philotheca

 

Sometimes the problem is you’ve planted something that’s incompatible with the plant that’s next to it.



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There are a few basic rules of thumb when it comes to plants to avoid near one another.

First, check that your garden plants are all about the same size and have the same light requirements.

 

When planting taller and shorter plants together, make sure that the shorter plants are spaced far enough.

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Real World Gardener Bandicoots are Wildlife in Focus

August 25th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

with ecologist Sue Stevens

Most Australians would have you believe that they know what dug those holes in their lawn.

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Long Nosed Bandicoot

Some say it’s lawn grubs, others say it’s worms coming up for air and leaving piles of dirt.

Bandicoot isn’t what comes to mind when these gardeners see fresh conical shaped holes with teaspoon sized piles of dirt in their lawn every morning.

Would you believe that most Australians have never actually seen a bandicoot!

 

Bandicoots are a gardener’s best friend because they eat spiders, cockroaches, a variety of insects, snails and most importantly their favourite food – the black beetle & beetle larva known as curl grubs. 

These grubs feed on the root system of your lawn causing dieback or brown patches.

Bandicoots are effectively aerating your lawn so that it will grow with renewed vigour during spring.

Bandicoots cause no long-term damage and are beneficial to lawns and gardens.

Remember that Bandicoots are protected and are currently under threat due to both habitat loss and predation.

If you live in a bandicoot territory and you have a suitable food source, you will have bandicoots in your yard.

Once the food source has gone, they will move on.

If you have any questions about Bandicoots, send in a photo, drop us a line  to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Problem shrubs in Design Elements

August 17th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

 

with Landscape Designer Louise McDaid

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There are plenty of reasons why shrubs-that is plants that don’t grow much beyond 3-4 metres, don’t do well.

The annoying thing is, the same shrub might be growing fantastically in your neighbour’s garden or another garden down the street.

So why doesn’t it grow well in your garden?

 

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Shrubs often end up with not much foliage lower down, and the majority of it up top

The main reasons for this happening are lack of pruning, or it’s growing in a shady position. If it’s on the south side of the house, a wall or a fence then it won’t be getting very much sun and this will most likely be affecting the leaf growth

Most shrubs at garden centres have been pruned so that they’re sold to you as a bushy plant.

 

Don’t be fooled into thinking that you don’t have to do anymore when you get it home.

No, no, no,-get into the habit of tip pruning a little and often so that plant continues to be bushy with an all over covering of leaves.

Don’t forget to also maintain the soil that the plant’s is growing in-that means watering and nourishing with organic manures and composts.

If you don’t want to risk a hard prune – or you like the top of the shrub the way it is and can manage it – then grow some low water use plants in the surrounding garden bed – use design techniques like combining shapes, textures, and colours to create a planting scheme to draw the eye away from the leafless shrub base

Hopefully, if you follow these tips you’ll have a lovely set of shrubs in your garden.

 

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Real World Gardener Spice it Up with Bay Leaves

August 17th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

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with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

Do you have a repertoire of a few herbs and spices that you always use in your cooking?

These herbs and spices become quite familiar to you and you probably think you know how best to use them right?

Not so right when it comes to this particular spice that comes from the leaves of a tree because there’s a big difference between using the fresh leaves and dried leaves in cooking.

There are a number of different types of bay leaves used in cooking in different parts of the world. California bay leaf that look like the Bay laurel that we know well–California laurel, (Umbellularia californica, Lauraceae), also known as Oregon myrtle, and pepperwood, is like the Mediterranean bay laurel, but has a stronger flavour.Indian bay leaf or malabathrum (Cinnamomum tamala, Lauraceae) also looks a little bit like the leaves of bay laurel, but is culinarily quite different, -it’s more like cinnamon (cassia) bark, but milder.

So, did you know that using fresh bay leaves in your cooking can leave a slightly bitter taste?

Perhaps not?

Fresh bay leaves are pungent and have a sharp, bitter taste.

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When dried, the fragrance is herbal, slightly floral, and somewhat similar to oregano and thyme.

The bitter note has disappeared altogether and is much more pleasant to use in cooking.

Myrcene, which is a component of many essential oils used in perfumery, can be extracted from the bay leaf.

Bay leaves also contain the essential oil eugenol-you may remember it being in another herb-Basil!

If you have any questions about John Stanley’s interview, drop us a line to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Problem Climbers on Design Elements

August 10th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with Louise McDaid, Landscape Designer

NEW SERIES: WHY WON'T IT GROW IN MY GARDEN?

This series came about because the question has been asked many times.

That being, why doesn’t xxx shrub, climber, tree grow in my place when it’s growing really well in my neighbour’s place or my relatives place down the road?

You can insert whichever problem plant you like. So to counteract that, over the next few weeks we’ll be discussing problems with climbers, shrubs, trees and just plants you like that don’t seem to thrive.

Climbers that end up with foliage all at the top and nothing lower down

This scenario might be ok if you want it to run along the top of a wall or fence, but if it’s in a prominent position the bare stems might not be attractive

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Stephanotis floribunda

Some common offenders are stephanotis, pandorea and clematis. Something like wisteria that does this can be a feature – the bare stems twining up a pillar or post, when the flowers are out you hardly notice the stems and when it’s not in flower they add a sculptural element

 

It’s not unusual for a climber to do this – in the excitement of it growing and reaching upwards is so great that we mostly just let them go on their upward journey, impatient that they get as tall as they can as quickly as they can – and we usually give them lots of encouragement. This is our downfall!

Sometimes the problem is just not possible to be solved and you have to start again. In this case, most climbers grow fairly quickly and starting again isn’t such a big deal, plus it gives you the opportunity to try something new.

Real World Gardener Plant Doctor Treats Peach Leaf Curl

August 10th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

with Steve Falcioni, GM for www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au

Have you ever had this happen to you on some of your stone fruit trees?

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proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.comWhat I’m talking about is when the new leaves appear in spring, they seem to be infected with something. They look thickened, curled and distorted, pale-green at first, but soon show red or purple colours.

Sometimes the whole leaf shows these symptoms and sometimes it’s only in patches on the leaves.

 

The disease occurs wherever peaches and nectarines are grown, and if not controlled can seriously weaken trees.

If you don’t treat leaf curl you might end up losing all the leaves on your tree, shoots could also dieback and your peaches, nectarines, apricots and even almonds could drop prematurely-they’ll probably show signs of the disease as well

If you have any questions about Peach Leaf Curl, drop us a line to  to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Pools to Ponds part 2 in Garden Design

August 3rd, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

pools+to+ponds.png

with Landscape Designer Jason Cornish
Last week, we started part 1 of pool conversions and what was involved.

We discussed why Swimming pools get a bad rap in enviro-circles-they cost a great deal to build, waste huge amounts of water and energy for maintenance, use chemicals to keep them clear and ‘safe’, and they take up a lot of space. Many people also just find them a lot of work to look after, which is especially annoying when they use them only for a couple of months of the year at best.

But, what if you’re already lumbered with a pool and are trying to make the best of the situation? Maybe it came with your property, or hindsight has kicked in after you’ve shelled out thousands to install something you almost never use…. What then?

Today we’re looking at what will actually happen to the pool itself, and allay your worries about insect pests that might come about from doing this type of pool conversion.

Something to think about if you don’t want that pool anymore.

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Simply draining the pool isn’t the answer either, because the pool interior will still require periodic sweeping and cleaning if you want to avoid raised eyebrows from your mother-in-law and other guests.

Pool conversions are more practical than just filling in the hole and you have something aesthetic too.

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Real World Gardener Australian Galahs are Wildlife in Focus

August 3rd, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

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The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

with ecologist Sue Stevens
You might recall that in days gone by, anybody who was driving badly, or being silly, was often called a'galah'.

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Then, most human galahs are young. If their galah habits persist, they may graduate, and become dills, or nongs.These parrots are easy to spot and you would think they like to hang in large groups, but this fascinating parrot is often misunderstood and under-estimated. The Australian galah is not only intelligent but also a loving social animal that mates for life.
galahs.pngDid you know that Americans pay $1000 for a Galah on the illegal market and many Australians keep galahs as pets because they just love their antics?









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But for Australian farmers they can’t get rid of this grain-destroying bird fast enough.
Another fact you mightn’t have heard of is that Galahs weren’t all that common before British settlement.
But now, because of all the grain growing, their numbers of increased dramatically.
Sadly, Galahs aren’t protected in most states of Australia because of their love of eating grains.
If you have any questions about Galahs why don’t you drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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