Real World Gardener Pool to Pond Conversions in Design Elements

July 27th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Jason Cornish

Have you got a pool that you don’t use any more?

The kids have grown up and it’s just sitting there looking a bit green.
You might need more space that the unwanted pool is taking up.
Pools cost quite a bit to put it in so what happens when they become just one big drain on the pocket?
Filling them in is an option, but that’ll be quite expensive too.

So what else can you do with that pool, even with a budget in mind?

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Let’s find out what this is all about.
Something to think about if you don’t want that pool anymore. Besides the unused pool is probably acting like a pond anyway, but you can make it into a more environmentally friendly ecosystem what will attract dragonflies and even small birds if you plant sedges along the edges.
apart from the environmental benefits, you'll be using less chemicals-good for your hip pocket and the planet.
Less power usage if you don't want or need a pump in the pond.
You can still swim in the pool if you like and the conversion is reversible.
Pool conversions are more practical than just filling in the hole and you have something aesthetic too.

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Real World Gardener Garden Loopers In Plant Doctor

July 27th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

PLANT DOCTOR

loopers+2.jpg

with Steve Falcioni from www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au
1-IMG_0218.JPGThe caterpillar stage of various moths, and butterflies eat the leaves and flowers of your plants non-stop and can destroy your crops almost overnight.eaten by this pest.
Somehow they’ve eluding being caught because they blend in so well with the colour of the leaves.

What am I talking about…the not so friendly garden looper.

Keep the garden free of weeds, check susceptible plants for garden looper eggs and crush them before they hatch.
They’re quite small so look very carefully.

Check the undersides of leaves for young looper larvae.
Hand pick and destroy them by dropping the caterpillars in soapy water.
You can net your veggie bed with fine netting to stop the moths laying their eggs.
For a rather yukky remedy you can try Cabbage looper soup spray.Larvae are susceptible to a virus that kills them.
And infected caterpillars will look yellow or white, and swollen.
Blend these sick caterpillars with water and spray it on plants to infect other larvae.
Best thing to apply is Dipel which contains Bacillus thuringensis when larvae are young.
If you have any questions about garden loopers why don’t you drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardening Cut Flower Gardening in Design Elements

July 20th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

      www.greenharvest.com.au and www.diggers.com.au

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid
Would you like a bunch of flowers in your house most weeks of the year, even every month would be good wouldn’t it?
Flowers can cost quite a bit but what if it didn’t cost that much at all?

How could we do that you ask, well it’s all from a cutting garden.

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We love flowers in the garden, but they’re lovely to bring inside as well. I love cutting aromatic foliage – herbs and scented leaves that give off their smell when brushed – and flowers from shrubs where you cut some of the leaf with the flower. Camellias are lovely for this – japonicas rather than sasanqua which shatter and are best enjoyed as a petal carpet on the ground.

You might have an area of a large garden you can give over to a ‘cutting garden’, as flowers grown for cutting may have different features to ones you would normally choose for your garden – for cutting consider long stems, large flowers and not too much worry about form or foliage – and how it will look inside your home, what scents and colours you like indoors. Choosing plants for your garden is how they look in situ so the overall features of the plant are much more important.


With a designated cutting bed, you can plant and cut without worry.

Select an inconspicuous location -- along a garage or in a back corner of your yard -- and be sure your cutting bed receives lots of sun and has some good soil that’s well-drained -- just like your other beds.

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A cutting garden has plenty of planting freedom.

Its sole purpose is to produce flowers for you to cut, so don't worry about how it will look.

You can mix and match colours, textures, heights, and varieties. Plant all your favourites.

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Real World Gardener Perennial Vegetables in The Good Earth

July 20th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

THE GOOD EARTH

with Margaret Mossakowska and Lucinda Coates from www.permaculturenorth.org.au
Suppose someone said to you that there’s an easier way to garden than those annual veggies that you keep sowing and growing each year, what would you say?
Also suppose a new agricultural breakthrough promised more produce, a longer growing season and much less work would you want to know about it?
These claims aren’t some get quick rich scheme  but does  involve a bit of a change in the way we do our veggie but doesn’t replace it of course.

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Nature’s ecosystems always include not only annual vegetables, but also perennials — edible roots, shoots, leaves, flowers and fruits that produce year after year. Besides fruit-bearing trees and shrubs, more than 100 species of perennial vegetables can grow well year after year in a spot in your garden.

Perennial vegetables are in addition to fruit and nut trees to a productive garden.
You can grow rhubarb, artichokes, asparagus, sorrel, garlic, banana, yacon-apple of the earth, strawberry, arrowroot,  and Malabar spinach just to name  few.

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You will need a permanent spot in the garden for these vegetables-somewhere with a fair amount of sun and where they won't be disturbed for many years to come. Of course, besides you harvesting your crop.
If you have any questions about perennial vegetables and where you can get them, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Perfume Gardens are Design Elements

July 13th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com


DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid
 Research by the Nursery and Garden Industry of Australia has shown that a lot of people visiting garden centres find them intimidating places.
Perhaps it’s the myriad choices, especially in spring when flowers are in full bloom, or it’s all those botanical names-a different language really.
It’s easy to be overwhelmed and buy the same annuals you’ve always had or simply choose plants, seed packets or bulbs that catch your eye. These approaches aren’t exactly the most inspiring way to plan a garden.
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Stephanotis climber-highly scented
And if scent’s important to your you might want to consider this next theme
Let’s find out what this is all about.

 
Themes give you a way to organize plants around an idea.
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Princess Pink Lavender-New Release

That challenges you to make it more interesting, and you’re going to come up with an original idea.

A theme may also reflect your passion. If scent is important to you, you’ll be attracted to a perfume garden.

As in any garden, it’s important to choose plants appropriate to your climate and the area’s sun exposure. Plants with similar water and sun-exposure needs should be planted together.

Plants like rosemary don’t need a lot of water, but thyme and basil need regular watering, -So that kind of thing can affect your plant groupings.
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Real World Gardener Perfume Gardens are Design Elements

July 13th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com


DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid
 Research by the Nursery and Garden Industry of Australia has shown that a lot of people visiting garden centres find them intimidating places.
Perhaps it’s the myriad choices, especially in spring when flowers are in full bloom, or it’s all those botanical names-a different language really.
It’s easy to be overwhelmed and buy the same annuals you’ve always had or simply choose plants, seed packets or bulbs that catch your eye. These approaches aren’t exactly the most inspiring way to plan a garden.
1-DSC_0190.JPG
Stephanotis climber-highly scented
And if scent’s important to your you might want to consider this next theme
Let’s find out what this is all about.

 
Themes give you a way to organize plants around an idea.
1-DSC_0154.JPG
Princess Pink Lavender-New Release

That challenges you to make it more interesting, and you’re going to come up with an original idea.

A theme may also reflect your passion. If scent is important to you, you’ll be attracted to a perfume garden.

As in any garden, it’s important to choose plants appropriate to your climate and the area’s sun exposure. Plants with similar water and sun-exposure needs should be planted together.

Plants like rosemary don’t need a lot of water, but thyme and basil need regular watering, -So that kind of thing can affect your plant groupings.
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Real World Gardener Habitat Layers in Wildlife in Focus

July 13th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

with ecologist Sue Stevens

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Spotted Pardalote-photo courtesy of Geo Nature


Do you like bushwalking or just walking through a park or reserve?As you walk through do you look at all the different patterns and textures? Parks, reserves and the bush is not just groups of trees. They’re made up of many different interconnected layers of plants and animals, all with different sunlight and moisture needs.

Did you know that there were so many layers within a forest, or bushland that birds occupy.
Not just the two or three that are most obvious.

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Spangled Drongo-photo Geo Nature

Within this layered structure of plants in the bush or reserve live a vast number of birds and insects.
These animals also occupy different positions in the various layers of trees shrubs and groundcovers.
For example, the White Browed Scrub Wren lives in thick bush, but the grey fantail prefers thin bush.
Within the tree layers there's top, middle and the trunk that could be occupied by tree creepers, spangled, spangled drongos and spotted pardalotes right at the top.
Some birds live at the tops of the trees and feed on berries, while others, collect insects from the bush floor.

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Red Browed Finch feeding on grass seeds-photo Geo Nature

Some insects live high in the different trees, feeding on leaves or other insects, some live in rotted logs, while others, find their habitat in the leaf litter on the forest or bush floor.
Then there's water birds,-shore birds, waders and pelagic birds which are those sea birds that don't come to shore.
If you have any questions about birds that occupy different habitat layers or have a photo to send it, drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

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Real World Gardener Shakespeare Inspired Gardens are Design Elements

July 5th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

DESIGN ELEMENTS

with landscape designer Louise McDaid

Shakespeare inspired garden design.
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Ann Hathaway's cottage-Stratford on Avon
 

Do you like a good play or going to the theatre? If you do you might know that one of the world’s greatest playwrights, William Shakespeare, was a dab hand at incorporating plants into his plays.

He seemed to know so much about them that it’s thought he was an avid gardener.

For example in Hamlet he uses fennel, columbines, rue, daisy and violets – I love that mix of 3 lovely flowers, an aromatic foliage herb and an edible plant

Midsummer nights dream

I know a bank where the wild Thyme blows,
Where Oxlips and the nodding Violet grows;

Quite over-canopied with luscious Woodbine,
With sweet Musk-Roses and with Eglantine

 

For all the readers and lovers of Shakespeare. You might have a favourite piece of prose, or remember a particularly touching poetic line – he was and remains the most prolific author to use references to plants and flowers.

 

In fact if you visit Stratford Upon Avon where Shakespeare retired to, I fancy you might see a Shakespearean garden at Ann Hathaway’s cottage.

There are even a number of public gardens using that theme around the world.

In Shakespeare’s time, gardens would’ve been formal as in the Elizabethan period.

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Ann Hathaway's garden-Stratford On Avon, England

What a great theme for a garden.

You could even put signs near the plants that provide the relevant quotations.

Ophelia says in Hamlet “There’s rosemary that’s for remembrance, Pray you, love, remember. And there is pansies that’s for thoughts.’

Of course from Romeo and Juliet, the best known quote or misquote- "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet."

If you have any questions about Shakespearean gardens why not write in otherwise all information will be posted on the website atwww.realworldgardener.com

 

Real World Gardener Spice it Up with Wattleseed

July 5th, 2014

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" />

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK


The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

SPICE IT UP

with Ian Hemphill from Herbies Spiceswww.herbies.com.au



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Acacia pycnantha

Did you know that there are nearly 1000 Acacia species found in Australia?
Have you ever thought of eating wattleseed? 
Not all wattleseeds are edible but those that are can be eaten cooked or dried and milled into a flour.

Acacia pycnantha is on the list as having edible wattle seeds.
The seeds of this genus, or group of plants has been used by indigenous Australians for thousands of years.
They crushed the seed into flour between flat grinding stones and cooked  cakes or damper with it.

You might be surprised to learn that wattleseed has been commercially used as a flavouring component in some foods since 1984.

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The main species  that have been  used traditionally as food and now for seed harvest are

• Acacia aneura – Mulga Wattle

• Acacia pycnantha – Golden Wattle

• Acacia retinodes – Silver Wattle

• Acacia longifolia var. sophorae – Coastal Wattle.

So it turns out that wattle seed tastes like chocolate, coffee and hazelnut.
It’s often added to ice cream, chocolates and bread, but don’t stop there,- you can use it in whipped cream and other dairy desserts.

There’s even a beer brewery that makes Wattle Seed Ale.
The best thing is that Wattleseed contains potassium, calcium, iron and zinc in fairly high concentrations so it’s really good for you.

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