Real World Gardener Climbing Plants in Garden Design

May 13th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album
Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Design Elements

with Garden Designer Lesley Simpson

Why do plants climb? Is it because
most climbing plants originated from rainforests and needed to reach the light?
That’s one theory.

Plus so many climbing plants have
different ways of reaching the top.

They can be twining stems with
tendrils like Mandevillas and Stephanotis, or scrambling like Banskia Roses, or
have thorns like Bouganvillea.

Let’s review some of these climbers
for your garden now…

Climbing plants are useful if you
haven’t got much room in your garden because they add a vertical element to
your garden and most of them don’t take up much room. Most need a support of
some sort, and most are evergreen, so even if they’re not flowering, there’s some
vertical interest with the leaves all year round.

Real World Gardener Eastern Yellow Robin is Wildlife in Focus

May 13th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

Wildlife in Focus

with ecologist and bird expert, Kurtis Lindsay

It’s a pity more birds don’t hang around for us to peer at and marvel at their birdsong and colouring, but maybe we should get up earlier.

You may have heard the sound before and wondered about what bird could’ve been making it. That’s if you’re up at the crack of dawn.

Let’s find out more

Eastern Yellow Robins prefer an understorey canopy of tall shrubs with a canopy of small to large trees. Think of this as two layers in your garden.

Because these Robins look for insects all year round, insect attracting trees and shrubs are recommended as is stopping the use of pesticides.

Trees with stringy, fibrous or chunky bark provide good nooks and crannies for insects to hide in, and provide a meal for insect eating birds.

The sound of the Eastern Yellow Robin is bought to you curtesy of Bill Rankin and Tony Bayliss of the Wildlife Sound Recording Group www.awsrg.org.au has kindly provided RWG with wildlife sound recordings for our 'Wildlife in Focus" episodes.

If you’ve seen an eastern yellow robin, send in a photo ,or drop us a line. to realworldgardener@gmail.com or by post to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675, or post them on Real World Gardeners facebook page, and I’ll post a CD or some seeds, in return.

Real World Gardener Reviewing Perennials in Garden Design

May 12th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

Design Elements

Reviewing Perennials
Do you know the difference between an annual and a perennial plant?
Annuals grow, flower and set seed in less than a year.
Perennials, are those plants that are way smaller than most shrubs, but they flower and set seed over a number of years.
Let’s find out about some of these now?
Perennials add that extra layer to your garden without which, just having trees and shrubs would be just two dimensional.
They come in so many colours, shapes and sizes, you’re really spoilt for choice. Your nursery in your local area will have the ones the grow best in your area, and probably can get in ones that you’re really after. I don’t mean those large conglomerate chains that all sell the same thing either.
You can perennial plants through mail order catalogs, and online as well as from your local nursery.
www.gardenexpress.com.au
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Real World Gardener Native Bees are on Living Planet

May 12th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.
The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album
Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Living Planet

with Manager, Urban Ecology, Katie Oxenham
Ever thought of keeping a beehive?

Maybe some listeners do just that.

Did you know that commercial honey
bees (Apis mellifera) are not native to Australia. They were introduced from
Europe in about 1822.
I bet you didn’t know that Australia
has over 1,500 species of “true Blue” Aussie native bees, some of which don’t
sting.
Let’s find out if keeping native
bees is for you….
You can buy a box of native
stingless bees to put into your backyard. Native bees are great for gardeners
or nature lovers. They’ll help pollinate your plants-well of course but best of
all they’re stingless.
Stingless bees are only for the
warmer parts of Australia that includes all across the top end and down to the
coastal areas of NSW around Bega.
If you’re in other states listening
to this you’ll have to give your stingless hive artificial support in the form
of heat.
Find out more at http://www.aussiebee.com.au/

If you keep bees, any bees, not just
native bees, drop us a line, send in a photo,. to
realworldgardener@gmail.com or by post to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville
NSW 1675, or post them on Real World
Gardeners facebook page, and I’ll post a CD or some seeds, in return.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Garden Design Reviews Shrubs

May 12th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.
The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album
Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Design Elements:

with Garden Designer Lesley Simpson
Older federation gardens knew their
shrubs. You might know of a garden with some large shrubs, probably a bit
unkempt now, that you’ve wondered about?
Some of them have gone out of favour
for no other reason other than fashion or fads. Yes, it happens a lot in garden
design. We seem to be asking for new releases every year. It doesn’t hurt to
look backwards sometimes to examine old favourites.
Let’s
find out about some of these now?
Of all the old fashioned shrubs,
Chinese Fringe Flower, with it’s dark purple leaves, and Rondeletia, with the
large pink waxy cluster of perfumed flowers are my favourites.
You can still buy them, but may need
a bit of searching or asking around. Maybe even mail order.

Real World Gardener Grey Fantail is Wildlife in Focus

May 12th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney, streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition. The new theme is sung by Harry Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album from the website www.songsofthegarden.com

Wildlife in Focus

with ecologist Sue Stevens

A habitat is where a bird or animal lives. They make nests and get comfy in their homes.
This cutest of little birds makes a nest in trees or shrubs. The nest is made out of Fibres, Moss, Bark and Hair. You will normally find their nests in native trees. Let’s find out what this cute little bird is all about….

The fantail eats a strict diet of…….. Insects, only the finest! Of Course! Spiders, only the juiciest! Why not?
A fantail catches its food by hawking like a hawk.
Let me know if you’ve seen a grey fantail and where. Perhaps send a photo to realworldgardener@gmail.com or by post to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675,  or post them on Real World Gardeners facebook page, and I’ll post a CD in return.

Real World Gardener is Caring for Indoor Plants in Garden Design

May 7th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

Design Elements

Caring for Indoor Plants

There’s a program going round called
Improve Your Plant Life Balance.

It’s not just for your garden outside, but
indoors as well. Recent research has shown that indoor plants significantly
improve a whole range of aspects of our indoor environment. 

From cleaner air to helping to lower stress
and negative feelings,
Let’s find how to look after these
indoor plants?

Air-conditioning systems are almost never designed to remove outdoor gaseous pollutants from air drawn into the building.
Plants greatly help in removing volatile organic compounds that are emitted from plastics/synthetics in furniture fittings, computers, printers and more.
These compounds cause loss of concentration, headaches, eye, nose and throat problems.
So, if you don’t have indoor plants because you thought it was a 70’s thing, forget that, get some today.
Ten Gold Rules of Indoor plants:
1.Don't
Drown Them
: Roots need air as well as water - keeping the compost soaked at all
times means certain death for most plants. Waterlogging kills by preventing
vital air getting to the roots and by encouraging root-rotting diseases. More
plants die through overwatering than any other single cause; they are killed by
kindness.  By the way, don't empty tea or coffe dregs into pot plants. Doing this attracts Psiarid flies.
2. Give
Them A Rest
: Beginners are usually surprised to learn that nearly all plants
need a rest in winter. This means less water, less feeding and less heat than
in the active growing period. Also make certain there are no draughts as this
can be fatal. If plants are close to a door, pick a different winter location away
from chilly temperatures. 
3. Accept
The Loss Of 'Temporary' Plants
: Some popular gift plants such as Cyclamen,
Chrysanthemum and Gloxinia will die down in a matter of weeks. You've done
nothing wrong, these types of flowering pot plants are only temporary
residents. 
 Either throw them into the compost or for cyclamen, plant them into a shady spot in the garden.
4. Give
Them Extra Humidity
: The atmosphere of a centrally heated room in winter is as
dry as desert air. Increase the air humidity placing
plants in a moist area such as the kitchen or bathroom. You can mist the
plants, grow pots in groups to increase the moisture surrounding plants or
double pot the plant using an outer waterproof container and fill the space
between the pot and the container with moist peat. 

5. Treat
Trouble Promptly
: Expert or beginner, trouble will strike some time. One or two
scale insects or mealy bugs are easily picked off; an infestation may be
incurable. Overwatering is not fatal at first, but kills when prolonged. Learn
to recognize the early signs of trouble.

 6. Group
Them Together:
Nearly all plants look better and grow better when grouped
together. The standard group consists of four to twelve clay or plastic pots
closely grouped together to produce a pleasing arrangement in which both shapes
and tints are varied. In the most usual grouping foliage plants are used to
provide the permanent framework and flowering pot plants are used to provide
splashes of colour. The taller plants, the darker greens and the larger leaves
are placed at the back of the group.

7. Learn
To Repot
: After a year or two most plants begin to look sickly. In many cases
the plant simply needs repotting into a larger container. The best time to
repot is in spring so that the roots will have plenty of time to become
established before the onset of the resting season.

8. Choose
Wisely:
Pick the right spot. Even
the expert can't make a shade lover survive in a sunny window. After buying
a plant monitor the activity for the first few weeks and make sure it's in the right place. 
 

9. Have
The Proper Tools
: Buy a watering can with a long, narrow spout and a mister for
increasing humidity, reducing dust and controlling pests. You will need a
good brand of potting mix and a collection of pots plus stakes and plant ties
or string. Drip trays will keep water off the furniture; a bottle of liquid
fertilizer and a safe pest killer will keep the plants looking healthy. To
complete your tool kit include a soft sponge, an old kitchen spoon and fork and
a pair of small sized secateurs.

10. Check
The Plant's Specific Needs
: Look up the secrets of success in an A-Z guide for
each plant. This will prove invaluable as you will detect problems, maintain
healthy plants and realize what plant is best suited for a specific location.
Did you know that air pollution is
almost always higher indoors than outside?

 

 
00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Spices it Up with Sumac

May 7th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

The new theme is sung by Harry
Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album
from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Spice it Up

with herb expert and author, Ian Hemphill for Herbies Spices.

sumac fruit close up, natural color

You may not have heard of this spice
before, but prepare to be surprised at what this spice can do. Let’s find out….

The spice is tasty on grilled meats
and fish or as a seasoning for rice. It complements lentils and other beans as
well as vegetables.
Substitute it into any dish that you
need to use lemon juice.
Sumac is used a lot in a tang tomato
appetiser called Za’Atar. I’ll post that recipe up on the web. If you don’t
have a computer, write to me and I’ll send you a fact sheet.
Let me know if you’ve used Sumac
before or send in your recipe to
realworldgardener@gmail.com or by post to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville
NSW 1675, or post them on Real World
Gardeners facebook page, and I’ll post a CD in return.
Za'atar-Tomato Appetizer
2 Tablespoons dried
thyme
1 Tablespoon sumac
2 teaspoons sesame
seeds, toasted
1/2 teaspoon table
salt
1 pint cherry
tomatoes
1 recipe fresh Flatbread
In a small container with a lid,
shake together the thyme, sumac, sesame seeds and salt. This is a Middle
Eastern spice blend called "zaatar."
Cut each of the cherry tomatoes in half
placing them into a medium bowl as you go. Sprinkle with one tablespoon of the
zaatar; toss well. Taste and add more of the seasoning, in small increments,
until you have what you consider a tasty concoction. Serve right away along
with the flatbread allowing diners to pile the tomatoes onto the bread for
themselves.
Makes enough for 4 to 6, depending on
serving size

Real World Gardener Bellbird is Wildlife in Focus

May 7th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

The new theme is sung by Harry
Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album
from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Wildlife in Focus

with ecologist sue Stevens

Heard and not seen is probably the
best way to describe this bird.

These birds get their common name probably
from their favourite food. Eating almost exclusively on the sweet, waxy,
crunchy shell secreted by tiny, psyllid insects, known as "bell
lerps" or "lerp psyllids".

Let’s find out more about these mystery
birds….

As Sue mentioned, the bell lerps are
tiny insects that feed on sap that they suck from eucalyptus leaves and
surround themselves with dome-shaped secretions that are designed to protect
their soft bodies from predators and from the environment.

Except Bell miners
or Bell birds love them.

Let me know of you have Bell Miners
visiting your garden, or send in a photo to
realworldgardener@gmail.com or by post to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville
NSW 1675,

or post them on Real World
Gardeners facebook page, and I’ll post a CD in return.

Real World Gardener with Design Elements for a Rocky Garden

May 7th, 2013

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney,
streaming live at www.2rrr.org.au and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN
edition of RWG is available on
http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

The new theme is sung by Harry
Hughes from his album Songs of the Garden. You can hear samples of the album
from the website
www.songsofthegarden.com

Design Elements

with Landscape Designer, Louise McDaid

Rocky gardens can be good if you’ve
got places to use that rock to build dry stone walls, but for some gardeners,
the rocks aren’t much good.

I know of one gardener who ended
up using an old bed spring to sift the rocks out his garden. That’s determined.
Let’s find out how to garden in a
rocky garden?
You can put your rocks to advantage
by using them creatively in the garden, with dry stone walls, gabions-we know
now they’re wire baskets filled with rock, or just a simple rock garden.

Of course we can build a reptile friendly area with rocks for those cold blooded creatures to bask on!

It may take a bit of time and effort
to do that. In the meantime grow your plants in pots, troughs, in fact any old
thing. When an area is ready for planting you’ve got yourself an instant garden
when you plant out your potted plants.

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