Real World Gardener Tropical Gardens for Cool Climates are Design Elements

November 30th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm in Sydney and Across Australia on
the Community Radio Network

NEW: streaming live http://www.2rrr.org.au/player/index.php.

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

Design Elements

 with Louise McDaid, Landscape Designer

Rainforests are found throughout the world, not only in tropical regions, but also in temperate regions like Tasmania
and mountainous regions in Victoria and New South Wales.

Montane rainforests are like tropical gardens in cool temperate areas, so it’s not such a stretch to
consider planting or designing with the tropical look.


Montane rainforests have quite a lot of year-round rainfall, are mostly above 1,000 metres and mostly have a
canopy layer but don’t have the year-round warmth and sunlight associated with
tropical rainforests

I always say that it’s important to remember that windbreaks and creating microclimates will help establish large leaved plants that might not thrive or do that well to start off with. But with a bit of planning, I’m sure you can get that tropical look for your mountain garden.
Close planting is the key, and layering.L
et's find out more....

Real World Gardener Yellow Rumped Thornbills are Wildlife in Focus

November 30th, 2012

Diminutive, active ,fast ,confident, these words are used to describe the Yellow Rumped Thornbill.
They eat mainly insects and spiders, and occasionally small seeds. Sometimes YellowRrumped Thornbills forage in trees and shrubs, but they are mainly considered to be terrestrial as long as there’s some tree cover nearby, and they often hang around parties of other small birds when feeding.
Let’s find out more…
PLAY: Yellow_Rumped_Thornbill_28thNovember.wav
Although there is evidence for declining numbers in some major cities as a result of urban development, YellowRrumped Thornbills generally have adapted well to suburban environments and may be common in parks and gardens.
Luckily for us, they have also adapted to agricultural lands, especially where there is remnant native vegetation.
Foxes and feral cats probably catch and eat them, dogs also attack them and poisoning from insecticide ingestion has been recorded in vegetable gardens.
If you suspect that your cat is catching native wildlife you can help by installing a cat run or enclosure.
Dogs should be kept on a lead when walking through nature reserve areas. They’re also hit on the road fairly regularly. If you live in an urban area, consider using public transport or riding a bike when possible to reduce the chances of road kill.

If you have photo of a Yellow Rumped Thornbill visiting your garden or nearby park, send in ,a photo and I’ll put it up on Facebook because we’d love to hear from you. realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR po Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

Real World Gardener Tropical Gardens by the Coast

November 26th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and Across Australia on the Community Radio Network. www.realworldgardener.com
REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK
The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

Design Elements

with Louise McDaid, Landscape Designer.
Tropical gardens seem to fit, hand in glove in coastal areas, because when we think of beach, we might like to imagine that we’re in an exotic location with the lushness of a tropical oasis.
It’s important to remember that windbreaks and creating microclimates will help establish large leaved plants that might not thrive or do that well to start off with. But with a bit of planning, I’m sure you can get that tropical look for your coastal garden. Close planting is the key, and layering.
Let’s find out how to create this near the coast…

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Real World Gardener Spice It Up with Chilli

November 26th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and
Across Australia on the Community Radio Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

For those of you who are thinking of
doing some planting this week, now’s a good time to be planting Zucchinis,
tomatoes, capsicums, chillies, cucumbers beans and beetroot, and sweet corn for
most of Australia.

Add a handful of dolomite per square
metre where you’re going to plant tomatoes, capsicums and chillies.

This is also the time of year, if
you haven’t already, check your irrigation system.

Over the years plants grow bigger
and might block the path of one of your sprayers, or perhaps some of the
drippers have become blocked. That happens all too often.

Spice it Up

with Ian Hemphill

Chilli is a health food.If you’ve ever avoided chillies
because you think they’re too hot, you’ve been missing out on some of the
health benefits. Not only that, there are some pretty mild chillies around that
you could use instead.
A green chili pod has as much Vitamin
C as 6 oranges.

Real World Gardener Design by Entertaining Tropically

November 16th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

STREAMING LIVE ON 2rrr at http://www.2rrr.org.au/player/index.php Wed. 5pm

Design Elements

with Louise McDaid

In a lot of places in Australia,
the days have begun to be quite warm, so thinking of tropical plants for an
area in the garden suddenly has become quite appealing. Even if you live in an
arid zone or cool temperate area, you can still achieve that tropical look with
plants that grow well in your local district. Knowing how to arrange them is
the key to achieving that tropical look, and around the entertainment area, it
might be de rigour. Listen here to find out....

The whole garden doesn’t have to
be tropical. If you live in a cooler  or
arid area, you might have a tropical theme within your garden style. Somewhere in
your garden where you like to sit and read or think, you can add a tropical
touch here and there, with plants that are suited to the climate you live in. There
is a microclimate that suits those plants that were mentioned. You get the
idea.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Design Around Entertaining Area

November 15th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

STREAMING LIVE ON 2rrr at http://www.2rrr.org.au/player/index.php Wed. 5pm

Design Elements

 

with Louise McDaid

In a lot of places in Australia,
the days have begun to be quite warm, so thinking of tropical plants for an
area in the garden suddenly has become quite appealing. Even if you live in an
arid zone or cool temperate area, you can still achieve that tropical look with
plants that grow well in your local district. Knowing how to arrange them is
the key to achieving that tropical look, and around the entertainment area, it
might be de rigour. Listen here to find out....

The whole garden doesn’t have to
be tropical. If you live in a cooler or
arid area, you might have a tropical theme within your garden style. Somewhere in
your garden where you like to sit and read or think, you can add a tropical
touch here and there, with plants that are suited to the climate you live in. There
is a microclimate that suits those plants that were mentioned. You get the
idea.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Design Around Entertaining Area

November 15th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

STREAMING LIVE ON 2rrr at http://www.2rrr.org.au/player/index.php Wed. 5pm

Design Elements

 

with Louise McDaid

In a lot of places in Australia,
the days have begun to be quite warm, so thinking of tropical plants for an
area in the garden suddenly has become quite appealing. Even if you live in an
arid zone or cool temperate area, you can still achieve that tropical look with
plants that grow well in your local district. Knowing how to arrange them is
the key to achieving that tropical look, and around the entertainment area, it
might be de rigour. Listen here to find out....

The whole garden doesn’t have to
be tropical. If you live in a cooler or
arid area, you might have a tropical theme within your garden style. Somewhere in
your garden where you like to sit and read or think, you can add a tropical
touch here and there, with plants that are suited to the climate you live in. There
is a microclimate that suits those plants that were mentioned. You get the
idea.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Tropical Garden Design Around The Pool

November 8th, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and Across Australia on the Community Radio
Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

STREAMING LIVE ON 2rrr at http://www.2rrr.org.au/player/index.php

Design Elements

with Louise McDaid, landscape designer.

What do you think of when the word
Tropical garden is said? Saying palms, coloured cocktail drinks with umbrellas
in them, lying in a hammock swaying gently in the breeze. Dipping you toes into
a pool.

Perhaps you did all these things
on your last holiday to a tropical isle, but wait, you can have it at home as
well. Maybe not all of it, but at least some of the features.

Over the next five weeks, Design
Elements will be talking about Tropical Gardens to suit any climate in
Australia. Today, you’re going tropical around the pool.

The whole garden doesn’t have to
be tropical. If you live in a cooler or
arid area, you might have a tropical theme within your garden style. Somewhere
there is a microclimate that suits those plants that were mentioned. You get
the idea.

00:0000:00

Real World Gardener Part 2 Hedges in Garden Design

November 1st, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and
Across Australia on the Community Radio Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

Design Elements:

with Landscape Designer Louise McDaid

Straight hedges, curvy hedges,
hedges for privacy, secret rooms, and windbreaks.

If you’re hedge is too much work,
gives you hay-fever, or just doesn’t look nice, pull it out. Yes, you can do
it.

There’s so many varieties of
plants that make great hedges that don’t spend any more time looking at the sad
excuse of a hedge.

Plant a better one, or, plant
another one alongside, you’ll be glad you did.

So many hedges to talk about.

This concludes the series on Living walls and
vertical gardens, - great for small spaces, or even big spaces when we want to
include an intimate or cosy part into our garden.
You can’t go wrong if you listen into Design Elements’ Living Walls and
Vertical Garden Series.

 

Real World Gardener is Birdscaping Your Garden

November 1st, 2012

REAL WORLD GARDENER Wed. 5pm 2RRR 88.5fm Sydney and
Across Australia on the Community Radio Network.
www.realworldgardener.com

REALWORLD GARDENER NOW ON FACEBOOK

The complete CRN edition of RWG is available on http://www.cpod.org.au/ , just click on 2RRR to find this week’s edition.

Wildlife in Focus

with ecologist Sue Stevens.

Gardens aren’t complete without our
wildlife visitors popping in for a snack or a drink. Sometimes we just like the
look of them, or it’s their musical song that has us hooked. Yet, there you are
toiling away in the garden and all you’re getting is the Common Minor or Indian
Myna birds that shoo all the more desirable birds away.
If that’s the case, you need to
rethink your planting, and here’s some tips…

If you have nice wildlife visitors
in your garden, drop the RWG team a line about who they are and what in your
garden they’re attracted to?
Or, send in a photo, because we’d
love to hear from you.
realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR po Box 644 Gladesville NSW
1675